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FBI File No. 80-MM-1353, Democratic National 
Convention, Miami Beach, Florida, Summer 1972, 1971- 
1975 

2011 

27-February-20 1 2 
23-May 23-2012 
14-June-2012 
17-August-2012 

29-October-2012 


Source of document: Federal Bureau of Investigation 

Attn: FOFPA Request 
Record/Information Dissemination Section 
170 Marcel Drive 
Winchester, VA 22602-4843 
Fax: (540) 868-4391/4997 

Email: foiparequest@ic.fbi.gov 

Note: This file contains Sections 1-29 of FBI File No. 

80-MM-1353 


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U.S. Department of Justice 



Federal Bureau of Investigation 

Washington, D.C. 20535 
February 27, 2012 


Subject: FILE NUMBER 80-MM-1353 
FOlPANo. 1178673-000 


The enclosed documents were reviewed under the Freedom of Information/Privacy Acts (FOlPA), Title 5, 
United States Code, Section 552/552a. Deletions have been made to protect information which is exempt from disclosure, 
with the appropriate exemptions noted on the page next to the excision. In addition, a deleted page information sheet was 
inserted in the file to indicate where pages were withheld entirely. The exemptions used to withhold information are marked 
below and explained on the enclosed Form OPCA-16a: 

Section 552 Section 552a 


□(b)(1) 

□(b)(7)(A) 

□ (d)(5) 

□ (b)(2) 

□(b)(7)(B) 

□G)(2) 

□ (b)(3) 

®(b)(7)(C) 

□ (k)(1) 


S(b)(7)(D) 

□(k)(2) 


^(b)(7)(E) 

□ (k)(3) 


□(b)(7)(F) 

□ (k)(4) 

□ (b)(4) 

□(b)(8) 

□ (k)(5) 

□(b)(5) 

□(b)(9) 

□ (k)(6) 

K(b)(6) 


□ (k)(7) 


2369 pages were reviewed and 2235 pages are being released, 

s Document(s) were located which originated with, or contained information concerning other 
Government agency(ies) [OGA], This information has been: 

□ referred to the OGA for review and direct response to you. 

H referred to the OGA for consultation. The FBI will correspond with you regarding this 
information when the consultation is finished, 

□ In accordance with standard FBI practice, this response neither confirms nor denies the 
existence of your subject's name on any watch lists. 

Ki You have the right to appeal any denials in this release. Appeals should be directed in writing to the 
Director, Office of Information Policy, U.S. Department of Justice, 1425 New York Ave., NW, 

Suite 11050, Washington, D C. 20530-0001 . Your appeal must be received by OIP within sixty (60) days 
from the date of this letter in order to be considered timely The envelope and the letter should be clearly 
marked “Freedom of Information Appeal.” Please cite the FOlPA Number assigned to your 
request so that it may be easily identified. 


□ The enclosed material is from the main investigative file(s) in which the subject(s) of your request was 
the focus of the investigation. Our search located additional references, in files relating to other 
individuals, or matters, which may or may not be about your subject(s). Our experience has shown, 
when ident, references usually contain information similar to the information processed in the main file(s). 
Because of our significant backlog, we have given priority to processing only the main investigative file(s). 
If you want the references, you must submit a separate request for them in writing, and they will be 
reviewed at a later date, as time and resources permit. 

Ki See additional information which follows. 


Sincerely yours. 


David M. Hardy 
Section Chief 
Record/Information 
Dissemination Section 
Records Management Division 


Enclosure(s) 


In response to your Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request for information in FBI files pertaining to FBI File 
Number 80-MM-1353, enclosed is the first interim release of all releasable information contained in FBI Miami main file 
80-MM-1353 sections 1 thru 9. 

Per your request, this release has been placed on a CD-ROM. No fee is being assessed at this time. When 
the second interim release is made in this case, you will be billed for the $5.00 fee associated with this first release as 
well as the $15.00 duplication fee for the second release for a total of $20.00. Each subsequent release will be made at 
a cost of $15.00. 




U.S. Department of Justice 


Federal Bureau of 
Investigation 


Washington. D.C. 20535 
May 23, 2012 


Subject: FILE NUMBER 80-MM-1353 
FOlPANo. 1178673-000 


The enclosed documents were reviewed under the Freedom of Information/Privacy Acts (FOlPA), 
Title 5, United States Code, Section 552/552a. Deletions have been made to protect information which is exempt 
from disclosure, with the appropriate exemptions noted on the page next to the excision. In addition, a deleted page 
information sheet was inserted in the file to indicate where pages were withheld entirely. The exemptions used to 
withhold information are marked below and explained on the enclosed Form OPCA-16a: 


552a 


Section 552 


Section 


□(b)(1) 

□ (b)(7)(A) 

□ (d)(5) 

□ (b)(2) 

□(b)(7)(B) 

□0)(2) 

E](b)(3) 


[3(b)(7)(C) 

□(k)(1) 



Rule 6(eL Federal Rules of Criminal 

[3(b)(7)(D) 

□ (k)(2) 

Procedure 


[3(b)(7)(E) 

□ (k)(3) 





□(b)(7)(F) 

□ (k)(4) 



□ (b)(4) 

□ (b)(8) 

□ (k)(5) 

□ (b)(5) 

□(b)(9) 

□ (k)(6) 

E](b)(6) 


□ (k)(7) 


2402 page(s) were reviewed and 2214 page(s) are being released. 


E Document(s) were located which originated with, or contained information concerning other 
Government agency(ies) [OGA]. This information has been: 

El referred to the OGA for review and direct response to you. 

El referred to the OGA for consultation. The FBI will correspond with you regarding this 
information when the consultation is finished. 

□ In accordance with standard FBI practice, this response neither confirms nor denies the 
existence of your subject's name on any watch lists. 

E] You have the right to appeal any denials in this release. Appeals should be directed in writing to the 


Director, Office of Information Policy, U.S. Department of Justice, 1425 New York Ave., NW, 

Suite 11050, Washington, D.C. 20530-0001. Your appeal must be received by OIP within sixty (60) 
days from the date of this letter in order to be considered timely. The envelope and the letter should be 
clearly marked “Freedom of Information Appeal.” Please cite the FOlPA Number assigned to your 
request so that it may be easily identified. 


□ The enclosed material is from the main investigative file(s) in which the subject(s) of your request was 
the focus of the investigation. Our search located additional references, in files relating to other 
individuals, or matters, which may or may not be about your subject(s). Our experience has shown, 
when ident, references usually contain information similar to the information processed in the main file(s). 
Because of our significant backlog, we have given priority to processing only the main investigative 
file(s). If you want the references, you must submit a separate request for them in writing, and they will 
be reviewed at a later date, as time and resources permit. 

[SI See additional information which follows. 


Sincerely yours. 


Hi 1-L/^ 

David M. Hardy 

Section Chief 
Record/Information 
Dissemination Section 
Records Management Division 


Enclosure(s) 


In response to your Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request for information in FBI files pertaining to 
FBI File Number 80-MM-1353, enclosed is the secod interim release of all releasable information contained in FBI 
Miami main file 80-MM-1353 sections 10 thru 15, 21 and 22. 

By letter dated February 27. 2012 . we sent you a CD-ROM containing the first interim release for this 
case. At that time, we explained that the $5.00 balance associated with that release would be billed with this release. 
Accordingly, upon receipt of the enclosed CD-ROM, please make a check or money order payable to the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation in the amount of $20.00 and remit payment to the Work Process Unit, Record 
Information/Dissemination Section, Records Management Division, Federal Bureau of Investigation, 170 Marcel Drive, 
Winchester, VA 22602. Please include the FOlPA Request Number assigned to your request with your payment. 
Failure to pay for this release will close any pending FBI FOlPA requests from you . Nonpayment will also 
cause an automatic denial of any future FOlPA requests. 



U.S. Department of Justice 



Federal Bureau of Investigation 

Washington, D.C. 20535 

June 14, 2012 


Subject: FILE NUMBER 80-MM-1353 
FOlPANo. 1178673-000 


The enclosed documents were reviewed under the Freedom of Information/Privacy Acts (FOlPA), Title 5, 
United States Code, Section 552/552a. Deletions have been made to protect information which is exempt from disclosure, 
with the appropriate exemptions noted on the page next to the excision. In addition, a deleted page information sheet was 
inserted in the file to indicate where pages were withheld entirely. The exemptions used to withhold information are marked 
below and explained on the enclosed Form OPCA-16a: 


Section 552 Section 552a 


□(b)(1) 

□(b)(7)(A) 

□(d)(5) 

□(b)(2) 

□(b)(7)(B) 

□0)(2) 

iafb1(31 Federal Rules of 

K(b)(7)(C) 

□(k)(1) 

Criminal Procedure Rule 6(e) 

K(b)(7)(D) 

□(k)(2) 


K(b)(7)(E) 

□(k)(3) 


□(b)(7)(F) 

□(k)(4) 

□(b)(4) 

□(b)(8) 

□(k)(5) 

□(b)(5) 

□(b)(9) 

□(k)(6) 

ia(b)(6) 


□(k)(7) 


955 pages were reviewed and 870 pages are being released. 

□ Document(s) were located which originated with, or contained information concerning other 
Government agency(ies) [OGA]. This information has been: 

□ referred to the OGA for review and direct response to you. 

□ referred to the OGA for consultation. The FBI will correspond with you regarding this 
information when the consultation is finished. 

□ In accordance with standard FBI practice, this response neither confirms nor denies the 
existence of your subject's name on any watch lists. 

H You have the right to appeal any denials in this release. Appeals should be directed in writing to the 
Director, Office of Information Policy, U.S. Department of Justice, 1425 New York Ave., NW, 

Suite 11050, Washington, D.C. 20530-0001 . Your appeal must be received by OIP within sixty (60) days 
from the date of this letter in order to be considered timely. The envelope and the letter should be clearly 
marked “Freedom of Information Appeal.” Please cite the FOlPA Number assigned to your 
request so that it may be easily identified. 


□ The enclosed material is from the main investigative file(s) in which the subject(s) of your request was 
the focus of the investigation. Our search located additional references, in files relating to other 
individuals, or matters, which may or may not be about your subject(s). Our experience has shown, 
when ident, references usually contain information similar to the information processed in the main file(s). 
Because of our significant backlog, we have given priority to processing only the main investigative file(s). 
If you want the references, you must submit a separate request for them in writing, and they will be 
reviewed at a later date, as time and resources permit. 

El See additional information which follows. 


Sincerely yours. 


David M. Hardy 
Section Chief 
Record/I nformation 
Dissemination Section 
Records Management Division 


Enclosures 

In response to your Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request for information in FBI files pertaining to FILE 
NUMBER 80-MM-1353 , enclosed is the third interim release of all releasable information contained in FBI Miami (FBI 
MM) main files 80-MM-1353 sections 16-19. 

Please be advised that, due to technical limitations, we are unable to make a release on a CD-ROM. 
Therefore, you are being provided a paper release at no charge. 



U.S. Department of Justice 



Federal Bureau of Investigation 

Washington, D.C. 20535 

August 17, 2012 


Subject: FILE NUMBER 80-MM-1353 
FOlPANo. 1178673-000 


The enclosed documents were reviewed under the Freedom of Information/Privacy Acts (FOlPA), Title 5, 
United States Code, Section 552/552a. Deletions have been made to protect information which is exempt from disclosure, 
with the appropriate exemptions noted on the page next to the excision. In addition, a deleted page information sheet was 
inserted in the file to indicate where pages were withheld entirely. The exemptions used to withhold information are marked 


below and explained on the enclosed Form OPCA-16a: 

Section 552 Section 552a 

a(b)(1) D(b)(7)(A) □(d)(5) 

°(b)(2) n(b)(7)(B) d0)(2) 

□(b)(3) 13(b)(7)(C) □(k)(1) 

>3(b)(7)(D) D(k)(2) 

®(b)(7)(E) D(k)(3) 

□(b)(7)(F) D(k)(4) 

□(b)(4) 0(b)(8) D(k)(5) 

□(b)(5) □(b)(9) □(k)(6) 

H(b)(6) D(k)(7) 


1798 pages were reviewed and 1572 pages are being released. 

□ Document(s) were located which originated with, or contained information concerning other 
Government agency(ies) [OGA]. This information has been: 

□ referred to the OGA for review and direct response to you. 

□ referred to the OGA for consultation. The FBI will correspond with you regarding this 
information when the consultation is finished. 

□ In accordance with standard FBI practice, this response neither confirms nor denies the 
existence of your subject's name on any watch lists. 

Ki You have the right to appeal any denials in this release. Appeals should be directed in writing to the 
Director, Office of Information Policy, U.S. Department of Justice, 1425 New York Ave., NW, 

Suite 11050, Washington, D.C. 20530-0001. Your appeal must be received by OIP within sixty (60) days 
from the date of this letter in order to be considered timely. The envelope and the letter should be clearly 
marked “Freedom of Information Appeal.” Please cite the FOlPA Number assigned to your 
request so that it may be easily identified. 



□ The enclosed material is from the main investigative file(s) in which the subject(s) of your request was 
the focus of the investigation. Our search located additional references, in files relating to other 
individuals, or matters, which may or may not be about your subject(s). Our experience has shown, 
when ident, references usually contain information similar to the information processed in the main file(s). 
Because of our significant backlog, we have given priority to processing only the main investigative file(s). 
If you want the references, you must submit a separate request for them in writing, and they will be 
reviewed at a later date, as time and resources permit. 

El See additional information which follows. 


Sincerely yours. 


David M. Hardy 
Section Chief 
Record/Information 
Dissemination Section 
Records Management Division 


Enclosures 


In response to your Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request for information in FBI files pertaining to 
File Number 80-MM-1353 , enclosed is the third and final release of all releasable information contained in FBI 
Headquarters (FBIHQ) main files 80-MM-1353 sections 20, and 23-29. 

By letter dated June 29, 2012, (from FOIPA#1 1178673), we explained that the releases made from the 
additional FOlPA numbers will be released on CD-ROM at $ 15.00 per release. Accordingly, upon receipt of the 
enclosed CD-ROM please make a check or money order payable to the Federal Bureau of Investigation in the amount 
of $ 15.00 and remit payment to the Work Process Unit, Record Information/Dissemination Section, Records 
Management Division, Federal Bureau of Investigation, 170 Marcel Drive, Winchester, VA 22602. Please include the 
FOlPA Request Number (1161 199) with your payment. Failure to pay for this release within thirty (30) days from the 
date of this letter will close any pending FBI FOlPA requests from you. Nonpayment will also cause an automatic denial 
of any future FOlPA requests. 

This concludes the processing of FOlPA request number 1178673-000. 



EXPLANATION OF EXEMPTIONS 


SUBSECTIONS OF TITLE 5, UNITED STATES CODE, SECTION 552 

(b)(1) (A) specifically authorized under criteria established by an Executive order to be kept secret in the interest of national defense or 

foreign policy and (B) are in fact properly classified to such Executive order; 

(b)(2) related solely to the internal personnel rules and practices of an agency; 

(b)(3) specifically exempted from disclosure by statute (other than section 552b of this title), provided that such statute(A) requires that 
the matters be withheld from the public in such a manner as to leave no discretion on issue, or (B) establishes particular criteria for 

withholding or refers to particular types of matters to be withheld; 

(b)(4) trade secrets and commercial or financial information obtained from a person and privileged or confidential; 

(b)(5) inter-agency or intra-agency memorandums or letters which would not be available by law to a party other than an agency in 

litigation with the agency; 

(b)(6) personnel and medical files and similar files the disclosure of which would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal 

privacy; 

(b)(7) records or information compiled for law enforcement purposes, but only to the extent that the production of such law enforcement 
records or information ( A ) could be reasonably be expected to interfere with enforcement proceedings, ( B ) would deprive a 
person of a right to a fair trial or an impartial adjudication, ( C ) could be reasonably expected to constitute an unwarranted invasion of 

personal privacy, ( D ) could reasonably be expected to disclose the identity of confidential source, including a State, local, or foreign 

agency or authority or any private institution which furnished information on a confidential basis, and, in the case of record or 

information compiled by a criminal law enforcement authority in the course of a criminal investigation, or by an agency conducting a 

lawful national security intelligence investigation, information furnished by a confidential source, ( E ) would disclose techniques and 

procedures for law enforcement investigations or prosecutions, or would disclose guidelines for law enforcement investigations or 

prosecutions if such disclosure could reasonably be expected to risk circumvention of the law, or ( F ) could reasonably be 

expected to endanger the life or physical safety of any individual; 

(b)(8) contained in or related to examination, operating, or condition reports prepared by, on behalf of, or for the use of an agency 
responsible for the regulation or supervision of financial institutions; or 

(b)(9) geological and geophysical information and data, including maps, concerning wells. 

SUBSECTIONS OF TITLE 5, UNITED STATES CODE, SECTION 552a 

(d)(5) information compiled in reasonable anticipation of a civil action proceeding; 

(j) (2) material reporting investigative efforts pertaining to the enforcement of criminal law including efforts to prevent, control, or 

reduce crime or apprehend criminals; 

(k) (l) information which is currently and properly classified pursuant to an Executive order in the interest of the national defense or 

foreign policy, for example, information involving intelligence sources or methods; 

(k)(2) investigatory material compiled for law enforcement purposes, other than criminal, which did not result in loss of a right, benefit 
or privilege under Federal programs, or which would identify a source who furnished information pursuant to a promise that his/her 

identity would be held in confidence; 

(k)(3) material maintained in connection with providing protective services to the President of the United States or any other individual 
pursuant to the authority of Title 18, United States Code, Section 3056; 


(k)(4) required by statute to be maintained and used solely as statistical records; 

(k)(5) investigatory material compiled solely for the purpose of determining suitability, eligibility, or qualifications for Federal civilian 
employment or for access to classified information, the disclosure of which would reveal the identity of the person who furnished 
information pursuant to a promise that his/her identity would be held in confidence; 

(k)(6) testing or examination material used to determine individual qualifications for appointment or promotion in Federal Government 

service the release of which would compromise the testing or examination process; 


material used to determine potential for promotion in the armed services, the disclosure of which would reveal the identity of the 
who furnished the material pursuant to a promise that his/her identity would be held in confidence. 

FBI/DOJ 


FBI File No. 80-MM-1353 

Democratic National Convention, Miami Beach, Florida, 

Summer 1972 

Section 1 



OPTIONAL FORM NO. 10 

MAY IS62 EDITION 

GSA FPMR (41 CFR) 101-11.6 


UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

Memorandum 


SAC, MIAMI (80-new) 


date: 3/29/71 


FROM : 


SA JAMES H. DOWNING 


SUBJECT j- 


SD SAC CONTACT 


As you recall, captioned individual is currently 
associated in the local insurance business and is originally 
from Savannah, Georgia, Several of y otar conta cts in that 
city remarked that you should contact] | after your 

arrival in Miami, 

Cr edit records reviewed bv icl 
reflect thatl 


He has been known to this Credit Bureau since 1965 an 
enjoys a v ery satisfactory credit record. His SSN is 
He has an account at I I 



I I wa s born in He s erved in the U,S, 

Amy/ Prom he attended] 

where he graduated, 

He was active unti l 1962 as 

He then came to Miami and has bee n 

associated with] ] 

He has no criminal record anywhere in Dade Cb^ty,, 


You may want to designatt 
SAC contact, / 


1 SERIALIZED .—FILED — 


80-new 

*^jHD/ems,,£^ 


MAR 2 9 1371 

Ktil — it L 


A f} ' -1 — 

CAe</<r 

Buy U.S. Savings Bonds Beguldny on the Bay roll Savings Blan ^ 



Director, mt 


Juiie 21, 1971 


SAC, Miani <80«Kow) 


MiaOCMSfIC im!T10KAL COKVEOTION 

/miahi beach, mOSIBA 

1972 


Chief of Police EOCKT DOjHBEAKC^, Miasit Beach Police 
Bcpartaest, coafi^catially advised oa June 21, 1971 he has 
been infomed toy reliable sources that the Soaocratic national 
Convention of 1972 ’»ill definitely toe held in Miaai Beach* 

The Eepublicans are es:pectod to hold its convention in San 
Diego - 


In anticipation of this eventuality, the Miami 
Office is opening a control file for receipt of all inforaa*- 
tion relating to this convention, it toeing assumed the 
Bureau will be requested to perform the same type of assis- 
tance in security and other matters as occurred in the 
ma^or political conventions of 1968. 

*phe Bureau will be hept informed of any develop- 
ments as such infomtation is received relUiting to the fore- 
going* 


2 - Bureau 
-Is,- San Diego 
l^J* Miami 
ERHiamt 

m 







Bulky Exhibit - Inventory of Prop^l^cquired as Evidence 

FD-192 (Rev. 10-6-65) 


10/20/72 


Title and Character of Case 


DSilOCSATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION, JULY, 
MIAl-II BEACH, FLORIM 
MISCELLANEOUS 


Date Property Acquired I Source From Which Property Acquired 


JUliX, 


JtfHUTUtiXiU-'iiXt; bUKiSEilA^AlMOlS 


Location of Property or Bulky Exhibit Reason for Retention of Property and Efforts Made to Dispose of Same 

BULKY EXHIBIT ROOM IDENTIFICATION 


Description of Property or Exhibit and Identity of Agent Submitting Same 

NEGATITES AND PRINTS OF PHOTOGRAPHSKK TAKEi;^ AT CONVENTION SITE. 


^ , JCT ^ 





SEMIANNUAL INVENTORY CERTIFICATION TO JUSTIFY RETENTION OF PROPERTY (Initial and Date) 



Field File » 80 ** 1353 ”' 


SEARCHED DEXEO ..„.- 

SERIALIZEg^ilc^LED:;S±:sv,.- 

OCT 2 0 1972 V 

FBI— MIAMI V 








sac, s&VAmm 


C, Uimi (80-l?ew) (P) 


PIKJPOSED SAC CONTACT 
MIAMI BIVISIOH 


Captioned individual currently resides a 



e sorve c in the V, Army fro 
he attended 
where he gr 


LEADS: 


SAVANMg 

AT BAYAmm. GA. 

Will check cr edit and crimina l records for all 
availahle hackground on I I 

WASHINGTON PIEr.D 

AT WASHINOKtON. D.C. 

1. Will review records at fc 

all hackground available. 

2. Will check credit and criainal records. 


2 -* Savannah 

Washington Field 
1/— Miami 
OHD/vsb 


-C-,. — 


eo - /3S3- fi- 




DIRECTOR, FEI 


7-13-71 


SAC, SAH DIEGO (80-0) 


DEMOCRAT IC HATIONAL COIiVEHTIOM 
MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA 
SUMMER, 1072 


Re Miani letter to the Bureau dated 6/21/71, 

Public sources indicate the verv definite possibility 
that San Diew nil! be selected as the site of the 1972 
Republican National Convention; ho:7ever, no d^^finite decision 
has been reached to date. 

The Bureau and Miani t-?ill be advised when and if 
San Die"o is selected for the Republican Convention, 


Bureau 

2j- niarl <8n-:iEU) 
X - San Dier;o 


AJMtmt 



0-Ci (IHo .. 5>22-64) 


--t. 





Transmit the following in 



F B I 


Date: 1/22/m 


{Type in plaintext or code) 


Via 


Airtel 


(Priority) 


To: SAC, Albany 

From: Director, FBI (ISV-SSSB) 

S^^DEMOJJSTRATIONS at the RATIC5NAL DEMOCRATIC 
f CONVENTION, AUGUST, 1868 
INFORMATION CONCE.UNING 
(INTERNAL SECURITY) 

00: CHICAGO 


ReCGlet 5 / 6/680 

By referenced letter Chicago canvassed each office 
requesting specific information as to each individual of 
interest to the Bureau that will be in Chicago at the time 
of the National Democratic Convention, This information was 
requested to assist Chicago in the identification of persons 
should incidents occur as the result of demonstration 
activity at the time of the Convention, 

The Bureau has been advised that only a fevi offices 
have responded to this request. In order that Chicago's 
request is clearly understood, the .following guidelines are 
set forth for each office. 

The information reqi^ested in referenced letter 
should be furnished to Chicago regarding all individuals 
who, because of their background and past activities, could 
logically be expected to appear in Chicago and engage in 
disruptive activities during the Convention. 



Airtel to SAC, Albany 

DEMORSTRA.TIONS AT THE NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC 
CONVENTION, AUGUST, 1968 
157-8589 


The above is meant to include pez'soxis v/ho are 
leaders or members of any organizational group concerning 
which the Bureau has an interest whether it be because of 
I subversive, right wing, New Left, black nationalist, civil 
I rights, antiwar or peace activity. You should also advise 
j Chicago accordingly as to any individual who is known to be 
violence-prone who might be attracted to widely publicized 
functions, such as a nationa.1 political convention. 

More specifically, you should furnish the requested 
information to Chicago concerning the following, but not be' 
limited to these groups! 

1 . All leading activists in the New Left or antiwar 
and peace activities who have previously engaged in the leader 
ship of demonstrations which resulted in violence or mass 


2. All individuals, regardless of organizational 

affiliation, attended planning conferences or meetings 

concerningrwiShs to demonstrate at the National Democratic 
Conventions This would include a conference such as the one 
held at Lake Villa, Illinois, in March, 1968, which was 
attended by delegates from all over the United States . Each 
of these delegates should be considered a possible visitor to 
Chicago in this regard. 

3. Any individual who has encouraged other persons 
or groups to engage in demonstra,tions at the National 
Democratic Convention or who has requested, on behalf of 

his organiza-tion, volunteers interested in such activity. 

Recent information indicates increased plans for 
demonstration activity at the National Democratic Convention 
and there has been, in connection with this information, a 
degree of secrecy as to v/ho the leaders of this activity %vill 
be. In view of this, it is imperative that Chicago be 
furnished information from all offices making it possible to 
idei:ktify persons leading demonstration activities at the 
Convention. Each office will, therefore, expeditiously 
check its files and sources and, thereafter, furnish the 
material requested to Chicago in the form requested in 


2 


Mrtel to SAC, Albany 

DEMONSTRATIONS AT THE NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC 
CONVENTION, AUGUST, 1968 
157-8589 


referenced letter by 8/X/68 without fail. The Bureau will 
be furnished by each office the communication v/hich submits 
the inforaiation requested to Chicago. It will not be 
necessary for the Bureau to be furnished the identifying 
data submitted as enclosures to that coiaiaunication. 



o 

00 file 
Bufile 


CHARACTERIZATION; 






SF^RCHED. 


SERIALIZED, 




.INDEXED. 
FILED i 


MAY 10 1968 





•* 




yo 




(photo) 


Name ; 


Besidence: 


Race : 

Sex: 

Height: 

Weight: 

Build; 

Hair : 

Eyes : 

Complexion : 

COB: 

Characteristics : 


Group Affiliation; 


00 : 

00 File 
Bufile 

ARMED AND DANGEROUS t s Yes 


f ) No 







SFARCHED___^NBEX£D. 
SERIAU2ED_i1L_FILw) — 


MAY 18 1958 


be 

b7C 


r 


T 


- OmOM*USO*M NO.. 10 
' ^ MAY I9AJ COirrOM C • 

(»&A rr«.!af u< Cft) 101 m.6 '' 

' V ATNiTED STATES GOVERNMENT 

'emorandum 


TO ; 

DIRECTOR, FBI 

(157-8589) 

FROM : 

SAC, CHICAGO 

(100-44963) (P) 


y 


subject; 

DEMCON 

y 



date; 5/6 /68 


Re Bureau airtels dated 2/16/68 and 
which authorized Chicago to canvass all offices 
regarding captioned matter, 

Enclosed are one copy each of sample data 
sheet and characterization sheet. 

In connection with the forthcoming democratic 
National Convention, August, 1968, at Chicago, allega- 
tions have been received by Chicago to the effect that 
subversives, civil rights and peace activists and 
anarchists from all sections of the United States are 
planning to converge on Chicago during the Convention 
• in an effort to disrupt it. 

Chicago is currently compiling a loose-leaf 
album which is composed of data sheets which . include 
a photograph and a brief resume of descriptive and 
background data of individuals of interest to the Bureau 
that will be in Chicago. This album will be used as an 
investigative aid to rapidly identify individuals should 
any incidents occur during the Convention. 

Where information is developed that an individual 
in which the Bureau has an interest, is traveling to Chicago 
to participate in any activity during the Convention, that 
Division should promptly furnish Chicago VT'ith photo, back- 
ground and descriptive data and a current subversive 

characterization when applicable. 

/ 

2 ■- Bureau (RM) 

2 - All Offices (Ends. 2) (RM) 

RWR : rr 





CG 100-44963 


For the sake of uniformity, Chicago has 
enclosed a sample of the format which is to be utilized 
in furnishing this information to Chicago. 

This information should be furnished in the 
typed form and photographs attached with scotch- tape. 
Photos should be best likeness available and should 
have subject’s name written on the back. 



|MCLASSIFICATIOH AUTHORITY DERIVED | 
pfel AUTOMATIC DECLASSIFICATION GUIdI 
DATE OZ-Ol-ZOlZ 




In R^ly, Please Rqfer to 
FUeNo. 


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 
J-EDEHAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 


Atlanta, Georgia 
September 8, 1971 


CONFIDENTIAL 


MY DAY COLLECTIVE (MDC) 
NATIONAL CONFERENCE 
ATLANTA, GEORGIA (NCAG) 
AUGUST 13-17, 1971 


A confidential source, v;ho has furnished reliable 
in formation in the past, furnished the following information 
onl I 



members oJ 
arrived in 


.anta, Georgia: 



I | came to Atlanta, to 

attend the NCAG scheduled to be held from August 13 to 
August 17, 1971. After visiting the site of the NCAG, a 
Unitarian Church near Georgia Interstate Highway 8$, the AMDT 
contingent proceeded to the Atlanta May Day C ollective (AMDC) 
Headquar ters located atl [Atlanta , 

Georgia , ~[At the AMDC an 

individual Identifi ed only as | 

I He claimed to have been a member of the 
last Venceremos Brigade (VB) which visited Cuba. He was 
later observed drivin? a vehicle bearing 1971 Nebraska / 


license plates 


I ' toup 7 ^ 
iLUDED^FR011 AUTOMATIC 

jNgrading aiMdeclassification 


SEP^?019ffl / 

FBI— 


/Z) 







MAY DAY COLLECTIVE (MDG) 
NATIONAL CONFERENCE 


ARMADILLO MAY DAY TRIBE (AMDT) 



The AMDT is an organization comprised of 
representatives from various anti-war groups at 
Austin,. Texas 5 and individuals from the University 
of Texas-, • Austin, Texas (UTAT), Student Community. 

It was organized primarily to coordinate and 
direct activities of those demonstrators 
participating in the May Day activities at Washington, 
D.C., during May, 1971, sponsored by the People’s 
Coalition for Peace and Justice. 

PEOPLE’S COALITION FOR PEACE AND JUSTICE 
(PCPJ) ■ 


A PCPJ press release dated March 1, 1971, 
described the PCPJ as being headquartered in 
Washington, D.C., and consisting of over 100 
organizations which are using massive nonviolent 
civil disobedience to combat racism, poverty, 
repression,' and war. 

VENCEREMOS BRIGADE (VB) 


The VB was formed in June, 1969, by a coali- 
tion of New Left organizations to encourage 
American youth to travel to Cuba in defiance of 
a ban on travel to that country by the United 
States Department of State. The ostensible 
purpose of the travel was to assist the Castro 
regime in the harvesting of sugar cane and other 
agricultural products and to give young 
Americans the experience of living ,in a 
revolutionary communist country. 


The AMDT representatives were subsequently housed 


[ 


at 
of 
be 

address were 


1 This is the residence 
both of whom are alleged to 


I Also ’Staying at the above 


only as 


According to 


1 and an indiv idual Identified 
attended Kent 


bo 

blC 




V 


/* 



' MAY DAY COLLECTIVE (MDC) 
NATIONAL CONFERENCE 



State University, Kent, Ohio, during the time of the National 

i. whj.'-ih .i.-caulu cid Xii Lhgi dteU Lhsi Ox .Tour Kteit i. 

R-hnHa-n^-g r^nv>-inn- Matr 1 Q7n I 


is described as a white male, five feet nine inches, 

"Propounds , red hair, and beard. 

At the time of the arrival of the AMDT contingent 
in Atlanta, both a Gay Liberation and Women's Conferences were 
being conducted. Those males interested in attending the NCAG 
found little to occupy themselves during this period as alP 
"straight” males were excluded from both of these -conferences , 


At the conclusion of the Women's 
contacted 


been in attendance. She explained to|_ 


Conference, 

] Who had 


J that the Women ' s 


Conference had decided to disrupt the NCAG to such an extent 
as to preclude the passage of proposals. They had resolved 
that it was much more important for people within the Women ' s 
Movement, Gay Movement, and MDC, to relate to each other 
before a successful national ac-tivity could be staged. She 
would not elaborate on the manner in which the NCAG would be 
disrupt ed or other activities conducted at the Women's Conference 
~| did indicate, however, that the women from Austin,' Texas, 
would not attend the NCAG but planned to return to Austin. She 
explained that they were not interested in sitting through, six 
days of argument and interfaction conflict which they exgegte.d 


-DO 

d7 

■b7 


to happen at the NCA©'. 

Austin V70uld go to any target- 
action planned by the NCAG. 


stated that the Women. 
site a nd participate inr. 




and the other Austiri^Ss^ii-' 


women were not xn favor of the above decisions made by the 
majority of the v7omen who participated in the Women's Conference. 

A self-iaentified homosexual mal e from th e Purple 
Star Tribe of Dallas , Texas , known only as | | stated 

that the Gay Liberation Conference had resolved to boycott 
the NCAG or to turn it in a new direction. He referred to 
all "straight" white males as "sexists" and stated that 
"We must learn to relate to each other before the movements 
can unite together in a common cause to overthrow the United 
States Government . " 



D O 




i. 


I 




MAY DAY COLLECTIVE (MDC) 
NATIONAL CONFERENCE 



The Austin, Texas, aontingent: or women whiuh 
attended the Wom en’s Conference referred to above, including 


in a 


"[departed Atlanta, Georgia, on Au gust' 14 , 1971, 
Ihearing 19 71 Texas license plates [_ ^ 




Q ■ ^ ■ — JT . , I 

Wh ile these individuals w ere in Atlanta they had been lodged 
at 


■bb 

hi 

b7 


The NCAG commenced on the evening of August 13, 

1971, with registration and workshops. The various activities 
related to the NCAG were held at numerous locations in Atlanta 
including the aforementioned Unitarian Church; the Free For 
All Baptist Church, 1461 North Avenue, Northwest; the West 
Hunter Street Baptist Church, 775 Hunter Street, Northwest, 
and the Jewish Community Center. 

The following is the agenda which the NCAG was 
to have originally followed: 



D O 



"Friday 



tto O _ /TT *» • ^*1 f*» 7 TT * 

U J. tA u J.WA1 V WllJ- UC4J.-LCiil V^JllUJ.WJlJ.y X S-»UU 5 IIUUOXJU^ 

Locations, Workshops. (Registration 7 p.m. to Midnight 
V/est Hunter St Baptist Church, 7 75 Hunter St. N.W. 

"7. p.m. -- Plenary Session-Determine agenda; present prev- 
iously prepared preposals without discussion; Films Theater 
Video. 

"Saturday -- Reg. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Free for All Baptist Church 
1461 North Ave N.W. 


"9'a.m. Workshops I 
11:30-12:30 — Workshops II 
2 p.m. Regional Meetings 
5 p.m. Dinner 

7 p.m. Plenary Session Presentation and discussion of work- 
shop and national structure proposals. 

"Sunday Unitarian Church (West Hunter St. rest of week) 

10 a.m. Regional and Constituency Meetings: Discussion of 

fall offensive, 

1 p.m. Lunch 

2 p.m. Regional and Constituency Meetings continue 
5 p.m. Dinner 

7 p.m. Plenary Session Present and discuss ’fall offensive' 
proposals without voting 

"Monday 

10^ a.m. Regional and Corstituency Meetings: Discuss rev- 

isions and amendments of all proposals. 

1 p.m. Lunch 

2 p.m. Regional and Const. Meetings continue 
5 p.m. Dinner 

7 p.m. Plenary Meeting: Discuss organizing and tactics 

1 p.m. Lunch 

2 p.m. Meetings of regional organizers, const, groups and 
national collective." 


5 


CONFI 


lAL 
































r — 


• • 


The following individuals were also observed 
at tne conrerence, nowever^ their origin is not known s 



The first major meeting of the NCAG was held on 
Saturday, August 14, 1971, The meeting was complete'ly 
unproductive degenerating into an interf actional battle. 

While presentations were made and various individuals held 
the floor from time to time, the Gay Liberation representatives 
succeeded in tying up the conference. It was hung up on the 
question of se>:ism* Those attempting to speak were 
interrupted^ and shouted down. It was apparent that the 
strategy which resulted from the Gay Liberation Conference 
and VJo®on’s Conferance was being im plemented , 


12 






CONFIl^iniAL 






T I and other AMDT members left the 
stcited that it was apparent that the 


conierence 

conference would be frustrated in its efforts to pass 
proposals concerning the fall action.] lappeared 

to be more knowledgeable insofar as tne conference 
manxpulation was concerned then he would admit. 


^ , J eKplained that by design, nothing would 

settled at the NCAG until the final session on 


be 

August 17, 1971, He further explained that 
would formulate the proposal for the fall MtlC action which 

— wou Id present ajt lihe fxnal NCAG session. According to 

I I proposal would be accepted by the 

hCAG. For thxs reason. F I and the other AMDT members 
abandoned the NCAG making only occasional appearances at 
varxouE meetings . 


The follot-jing are some of the position papers, 
statements, and proposals made by the different MDC 
groups and others during the NCAG, Many were not brought 
before the NCAG as a result of the Gay Liberation tactics, 
however, the proposals were circulated among those in 
attendance: 


■b6 

b7C 

b7D 


13 


CONFiaENTIAL 




tlPPDP ynpK St -Iff: Mx-yr-.Y propr,;';/ t, 


COIIFIBENTIAL 


Uppo.r llet-T Yorl; f»riy n. opXfs r«,r!'!Hno for a iia~ 

tional clcwonstratioii in ^'nr.hinr^f.u.n o ilr Lvo fiavs after 
rocfional aotfLonrs, asi r>rcc :>r.‘ ui b'*’ Pr’'>./, be loais- 

ticallv impoof^sbie. Tn x- j f.cc3 fci-’ t it vw.ild 

be polit:?c^llY roro c ‘ » .ociv,*; tr, ha-'-.’ t**.-c;»->nL ac- 

tions. bC' ‘Support PrPO’s call ior f parches hvf^ ral- 
lios in pajor cities on ?''o-«’DPhr»r bo?:ovoY, rath*- ’'* than 
aoino to '■■ashinCTLon on the 7th or Pl-bj \ o p«:or»ono thr-t 
’^''av Pay oeoplo £cmtAn 3 n their ri*qir<ital tavrfot c3 mvl 
carry out pobll civil pir.raptaons on I'ovMrTor «. 

VIETN^T" W1I.L Tiin* 



Opncral Political ytat<.'Pi?nt CQIT^j&te^TIAL 

Last Sprlnn'y d: cr.ytr.'tlon,’ . L-I>t ytpp fcm.'iifd for 'else nfevoi’sent 

and the people's flr'iiplt^ le a lot of v^yy fu llayday vc sa./ the larf^est nwiber 
of people ever g ’t toaethur ior clvH dl* otv-dleac?-. The spirit and courage sho^'n 
during the actlcre v-ay cpr<% ii.l/ scyethhig i«.> be u" -'I ivd. The concciou- anti- 
imperial l&t [ olltlcs of Mayday took thv antl v ar aow a ’n t fcv an entirely dlffer*int 
and hiplier lavel than previous protcr.tc. T* e level cd ,tr».‘gle t’as rnlz 4 and 
through the result In*'* repress Ion |J '*2 gov.jr.vr-.it’ivc v.ns r'-Tpoved. It seew; tent our 
move;, nt lu hkicc dng itore democratic lnt-«-rn-'lly ,’nd that v;e are loom Inn to looy; 
tui7«u « tti*; Hove I op lug wowen'*? ana gay loi luaut^i bn i p. 

The Hayday ojowment has shown the validity and significance of th-j concept of 
a Revolutionary Youth flowment as no other movement has been able to cb In tha past. 
The movement has shown generally the potential that youth can bring to the struggle 
for n nev; society. Increasing numbers of young people, not as committ' d to the 
sysrva ns their parents, and v/ith greater mobility, have shown a v/111 Ingnass to 
put chemselvas on the line. 

Uhlle recognizting the Importance and significance of the Revolutionary Youth 
Movement gen^»rally and the Mayday movement in particular, we must also realize the 
limitations of these ffioveme^nts. Youth, dS youth, is not a critical sector of soclet'. 
or specifically of tlr ^ economy. Vhllc some of the struggles that we have v;agcd 
(such as tha Kent Ttate-CemLodlan Invasion strikes and the Mayday actions last 
Spring) have had an effect on national policy, they have not had a' decisive effect. 
Wo must also realize that when v« speak of the youth movement we are talking pri- | 

marily about a movomint made up of students, e:<~students , and street people. The 
Mayday roovemfant has yut to r*cally broaden Its base to Include working class youth ■ 
and people In the various communities. Their is a significant lack of Third V/orld 
leadership In the ririyJay raov* ikicni, . , 

Vb must consolidate and expand the present youth movement. The primary dir- 
ection to move In this area is toward the coiwiiunities and among working class youth 
generally, ’?e must move from cultyral forms of struggle to more political forms , 
of struggle while at the same time retaining and .developing the good aspects of 
youth «;ultMr Wo must emphasize th importance of Third World, VIomen's and Gay 
leadership both In our own movefflent and In our attitude' toward, other movements and 
organizations. ‘ * , 

Proposal For Mayday Organizing 

As the Mayday uav-rstient branches out Into other sections of /American society 
all of us must sc;, ours«ilve 5 as organizers. Wc must build a Mayday movement and 
organizacion from the base up. At this point a rigid national structure would 
bn harmful «;o the movcTOtVit, In this period national and regional leaders should 
sirva >-v. ccvfc! inators and tnould think of themselves fn terms of being phased out 
of the le»,*c;\iri.hip when pcoplti on the local level build raovements of significant 
size and influancv. and ore able to assume higher leadership positions. Wc should 
ba organizing ourt?alv> o Into Serve Th feopl*, collectives (such* as dfv core groups, 
food co-ops, free clinics, free clothing c.nler'; people's garages, '•.ofR’w houses, 
bookstoccr. , print-shops, people't vntei + virvont groups, etc.) and attkm.»-ing to 
link uo v/ith the G.l. .nd yutora.ns mc/vwff<..nts , high school organizing pt^jeots, and 
oxirstiug progresnl vfi coaunr*-"'/ iiroups. 

15 COI'lFta^ITIAL 

W-; should b.* roiiiginij in regional actions and commun I ty movements ^ B'ul 1 d the 
aovfc?eicr*t on a local *1 v*l, Ha sho'iio’ he attacking Isiiperlal 1st institutions such 
aa Selective Service, ts.O.T.C., and the big corporations; we should bo protesting 


• A COIT ^^BgNTIAL 

h r.<! i on ^yntc'ifl, '=;pr { 1 itt>!;:y^and 'So-rporatc. 

recruiters, Ina.i^qis.jiio health Cs^*re, tee. .nd v;c should be doing v/cifaro rights 
organizing, stri’.e euf-porc ucticiVs fad n.->. liefny tvorl; nt the, point of production 
in oactorles acre.-j the country. In di o> these aciivltes and projects 'we 
should build cn the best r* »pects ot tie Wiovement and see cursaives ok- 

panding to broader s^cctloris of thr f ‘pulnt ion , -special ly v^orking class youth. 

We should have rin attltu h of loarning from the oplo .md serving the pcopta. 

The Fall Offensive 

The Fall '■'ffcnslvo* should take tii- iorm of f?roa and rcgicnal actions cul** 

111 U «;a-tlOU \UI UV*J llfllietul en-tlUHiJ, UUU On UlL'.Cf K / , 

The nriio and regional actions should servo as tools in building the roanyfacetfid 
struggle on the basic level and should involve ns many people as pcssible. The 
national action should serve as an occasional national focus for Mayday activity 
all across the country. The area and regional actions vtould be on© of t' c move.-., 
lii^'.nt’s main organizing tools on the local level while the national actlc' would 
be used to put pressure on the government over Issues of national policy,* Both 
types of actions are Ifinportant; each typo can be used to build for and reinforce 
the second type. 

The Haydr,y movement must attempt to re-define the terms of victory at an ac- 
tion. Victory should not, at this point, be gauged in military but rather poli- 
tical terms. The strength of a political victory ought to bo judged in terms of 
the points made. The Mayday movement should sbov; political and material support 
for the various liberation struggles being waged inside and outside of the U.S. 
Our actions should put forward militant anti-imperialist, anti-fascist, antl-racii 
and anti-sexIst politics. Success in our actions should aiso-be judged on the 
deyreo to wnich a real movement, with on incrcaseingly broader base in the Amer- 
iCfiri people , d.v^lops out of th-; uctlonb, 

Vk' should recognize the protracted nature of the struggle we arc waging. Th 
means that we should refrain from the adventuristic and suicidal actions that we 
ha*'o a tendency to lapse into and that we ought to put a priority on mass work. 
Willie recognizing the protracted nature of the struggle we should also .attempt to 
raise the level of militancy, as long as the struggle remains a mass one. V/e 
should, af all times, guard against the tendency toward pacifism and should en-. 
courage a policy of active self-defense against pig attacks. * 

Generally our politics should precede us to the site of any national action. 
If the next national action v;ere to take the form of militant marches through the 
co.iSRun I tics culii.Tnating in a demonstration at some imperialist center, for exampT 
than intense political work should be done both In the communities and among the 
vvorkortf th.'jt would certainly be present at any government or business center. Thi 
n.'*are. and goals of the action should be explained to anyone v^ho comes Into con- 
t»',: with thw action, *'■ wall us the media, and they should be encouraged to 
pjri Icipats*^. 

Daxc jto fight, 'ko~.: to t-rlA 

Fi^his fail; klght again s fail again 

Fight Oil ro victovtf ^ ; 

CONFLlei^lTIAL 


IFLLOa SPimiGS-;, OHIO MIDAI 






^ JK V>' X 

ST^P BUSINESS AS USUAL 



moratorium 

We BE3HEVE THE TIME HAD COME WSWj 

TO auRviVE, America MyoT torm 

AROUND. 

Our nation Ican be destroved bv war® 
poverty^ racism and P0H.I7I0A!. 
REPREoaioNa These eiv;^ 

DED OUR PEOPLE MORE CEEPLV THAN AT 
ANY TIME SINCE THE CiVIL V"/AR» BUT 
WE DEL I EVE THERE 10 THE ENERQV, 
IMAQINATIOW AND POWER WITHIN THE 
PEOPLE TO TURN AMERICA AROUND. 

On OcToaER’I^s Americans in every 

TOWN* CITY AND VILLAQE ARE URGED TO 

crop WORK, atop acKooLo interrupt 

OUR NORMAL ROUTINE, STOP BUSlNESe AS 
USUAL, TO TELL THE COVER NMENT THAT 
IT MUST END THE WAR KW AND 0ES9M TO 

meet The real needs of all people— 

TO SUARAMTEE FULL EMPLOYMENT AND AN 

Adequate income for all and an end 

TO POLITICAL REPRESSION. 

Two Years ago in October, there was 
the first NAT|ONV7iOE h^>ORATO.Rf UM. iN 
THE LAST TTVO YEARS, TMOUSANOa MORE 
M^ericans and Vietnamese have been 

KILLED, WOUNDED AND MADE H07.1ELE08, 
MORE COUNTRYSIDES LAV WASTE AND 
CULTURES MORE OEVASTATEOk ThE WAR 
HAS seen WiOENEO AND ESCALATED IN 
CAr.HDOOIA AND LaOC WHILE SATURATION 
BOMBING CONTI NUS8 THROUGHOUT iNOO*^ 

China at a rate unpreoi dented in 

HISTORY. 

Jn the, last two YEARS V7E HAVE SEEN 
OUR CITIES CONTINUE TO OETEORlATSo 
UnemplOYRIENT and INFLATION ESCALATE 
HAND IN HAND. SLUMS AND GHETTOSS 
C074TINUE TO 0G8TR0V THE LIVES OF 
MANY OF OUR PEOPLE, V'.HJLB NUsa.EA'4 
\7AR and the ECOLOGICAL CRISIS 
THREATEN US ALL. V«?E HAVE SEEN 

America enter it© kost Rt^Rcssivs 

PERIOD SINCE THE TIME OF JOOC^H 

Me Cartmv 


18 


OCTOBER 13 


But hope is rising. People ars 
coming T0Q ether® 

A MASSIVE MAUORITV OF CITIESfiO WANT 

THE Unitco States to get out of 
Indochina now. Speculations about 

HtLWUftaSU Wf" A 

f^ETINQ CANrSOT BE A REA80W F'OfI 
ALLOWING THE MURDEROUS WAR IN iWBO«> 

China to go on one day los^ger, I^e 
WANT THE President mo Congress to 
SET THE DATE NOiV FOR TOTAL W|T«» 
ORAWAL OF US FORCES FRORf VIETNAM BY 
THE END OF THIS YEAR, 80 THERE ©AN 
be AN immediate CEASE FIRE AMS ALL 
PRISONERS CAN 8E HOME BY CkRISTMAS. 

Speculations about the results of 
THE US Presidential elections next 

YEAR CANfTOT BE A REASON FOR P08T« 

ponino a new beginning in America. 

Vfe WANT THE Congress to set the oats 

NO^ FOR FULL EMPLOYMENT AND A MINIJAIM 
OF $6500 GUARANTEED ADEQUATE INCOME. 
FOR A FAMILY OF FOUR, 

By OUR ACTION ON October l3« we will 
reassert the principles of the Bill 
OF Rights and we demand that all 

POLITICAL PRISONERS BE SET FREE. 

The People, have the power to stop the 

WAR NOW AND TURN AMERICA AROUND. V/C 
KNOW FROM ESIPERIENCES THAT UM.ESS THE 
PEOPLE ACT, THE GOVERNMENT WILL ACT 
TOO LATE AND TOO LITTLE, IF IT ACTS 

IME TIME TO ACT IS NOWI 

October 25»26s Massive Non-Violent 
Civil Oisosedience, Washington, O.C. 

November 6i Demonstrate in New York, 
Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, ^evo.AND, 
Denver, Detroit, Houston, Los Angeles 
Minneapolis, Philadelphia, Salt Lake 
City, Sam Francisco, Seattle, Tampa 

AND WaOHINQTON, 0^« 

^ IDENTIAL 




917 15% Street. NM Room 602 Mshm^mD£. 2000$ 

(9n7\ Q^n r\ 



‘Sa ]p«30pl<ja Coalition nn'i tha FoXjibffensl^ 

CON !*^g£MTIA L 

Politi cal Perapectivo ; Our idena for the f til Circ bafjod 
about fcho fall porloJt- 

I» In spite of troop rithcJx'awals, which «r.ay even be speeded up Jn the fnll^ 
end In spite of niwen’s rauch t^iv..sd'ni.put China trip, tha U.S. wlSl con® 
tinu<^ the war in pvr'^ult-.ef fch:- aara:* basie' p^4*,cy cl.JcotiVGgs the n’aln** 
'fconanno of a non~cci«'Sunlst clicni: in ‘Jouth Vletnar^j 

2b"* .-The Pentagon P. i-fcrSy th« reoent ocrce Initiativcj by lime . Binh .In Paria^ 
and the likelihood of treu3nar:en'*ly f -nttdrltnt elections In South Viotnaa 
in October, .:lll all contribute to iRcreArln*y and prlirHfvlng jni-i f-y 
consonsuo for the U.S. to get oht of Vietnam, 

3. I'v ,r;?. :o of tha fact that: opp^jsltion to the war in the U.S. will to larger 
tW.’a-it avot has boon befcroj^.lt is possible that opposition will not ba 
AS vociferous or intense as it has been during othSr periods. Many 
Americans may fall back to a •’imrtV.and-se©'^ attitude in tha fall, hoping 
that the US, -China summit meeting will bring an end to the war, or iocitslng 
their hopes on the Presidential elections in 1972, I'hare are no speculations 
about the future which can justify allowing this murderous war to go on 

one day longer, . . - 

4, At the same time, tha war on poosr people and Third World Peoples continues 
unabated, Unoin|[loym®nt ha.s reached depression proportions in many ar^as 

of the country. Among young blacks, Puerto Ricans, and Chicanes, ths; 
rate of unemploi’mcnt is over SOJi, At the same time, it looks likely that 
this fall, tho Senate will pass the Nixon-Hi 11s. so-called ’'Pamily Assistance 
PlaiP> which nltho advertised as reform Is actually a higher level of 
repression against tha poor with forced labor and reduced payments for 
virtually all welfare recipients. There is an absolute need for those of' 
us who .SGo Vietnam, not as an accident, but as a natural expression of 
American imperialism, to seo the war against poor and Third World peoples 
as pert c£ that same system * and to contintAQ to link together the 
struggles agair.st those two wars as was dene during tho Spring Offensive. 

PCPJ«s Fell Calendars , . 

Sep, 8 - looal dofflonstrhtions at homo offlcoa of U.S, Senators to put pressure 
on them to vote sg''?.nst the repressive Mxon welfare “reform^ 

Oct, 13 - Katlonal Moratorium; Step Work, Stop School, Stop Business as Usual - 
local antiwar actlotts, 

Oct. 25-29 - Iteok of aasslve nonviolent civil dlsobodieaoe in Washington (plans 
and ideas outlined below) 

Kov, 6 - regional marches and ra.ltie.s In cooperation with I5PAC 

Plj<ns fo r Civil actlens in' !• Washington ; 

Each of tna eicraants in thl.s calo:;. -r c*n contribute significantly in the 
struggle to curb tha US war machino r.t hosa and abroad. Tactically thorO is 
a strogg feollng within the Poopl'^s Coalition that altho marches and rallies 
nro aignificcint parts c£ the peace .and Justice movements, they should not be 
conr-idored to bo tit:? aelc? tactic,' At tho 5ra.t0cnal conference of the P-ooples 
Coalitions for Pcac:5 Juctlct. in Milwaukee in June, thore was a nunaminous 
re-affirantinn ef .it dicofeodienca us being an appropriate mass tactic in 
tho struggle agqlnsfc tha war. 




9 9 CONFIDENTIAL 

At pi'oaont tlifj Pcoploa Gonlitionjs plena for civil ^iao’»3o9:i4jnc6 
in Uaolvinf^ton oi-c iiiolv.linr, datcOB Input from th© 

Mayday and tlio Clorr;7 and L;rr.?,*ra, xtOiiccrnod conforoiicoo ore es- 
sential before 're fineiiso v'i-^no t*nd bo.'jin pronotional efforts® 
V)hnt follOHO are tbo tt-jo pl'.rifi ciirroatly boin;;;' soriouoly 
considered vricliin X'Oi-'e 

DAILY DEATH TOLL ACllOlT; Borrinnin'^ in <?£trly October, cnoupu 
of 300-LvC0 porson, oquol to tb*' ne.v.ibor of porsens boingrdcilled 
in Indochinn ifonld covu oaoh day iraito Honso, Each group, 
tjhici. vjould como from differ.ont regional or constituency groups. 


v;ould carry on. a fast and vigil (or appropriate tocuia; ana 
tlion at a predbtomined tiiio^ lie doxm at the ontraiicoe^ Each 
6.ay in Indochina this many persons are killed because ITinon 
refuaos to set the date® All those deaths can be’ laid dranati- 
oally at President llixon^s doorstep® The ’’death toli” Kould 
mount day by day at Ninon’s doorstop, just. as .it mounts liter- 
ally in Indochina each day he refuses to sot the date; Xf^ this 
action troro to begin the first xj-oelc of October* it shouM bc^ 
continued at loast through Thaiilis giving, and possibly to Gliris^- 

t!10S« 

ilOHVIOLSLIT SIEGE OE m'VffilTE HOUSE PLAN: At propent this’ plan 

is for a ono-day (mayday-liko? ) action on Tuesday, Oct® 2o, 
though similar actions could bo continued for tho .rest of' the 
x-rook. The proposal is fbr a massive sit-doun aromd the (fnito 
House, Participants xrould converge on the VAiito House from all 
directions® • Tlioy might -como as individuals, or in snail collec- 
tives, or as affinity .’groups, or as members of •woll-oj'ganised 
marches (from tho Pentagon, HEV/, tho Capitol, the CIA, State, ^ 
or Justice Doptsu), All groups would plan to arrive -in the vi- 
cinity of tin' VAiito House at about the same time® Once ihoro, 
people would d t d) m® If tbs sit-dotaii took place, not only 
xrould it stop b'usino’ss as usual at tie VAiit-e House, it would 
probably clog' up a good part of downtox-m Vrashi’hgton. _ It could 
only bo stopped by Mayday -^scale- arroats or mass gassings of - • 
d.ox.^ntoxna Washington'; ■ • , V • • . 

Footnoto bn Targets and Dates: There has boon' discussion 'of . 

tIio"'(JbpTtOl, or ' the- Sixpreme Goxirt, or the Pontogon.as more 
relevant targets than' the VJliite Hoixso® Currently though,''; 
iiiost people sooYii to. -faxor ,the VJhito House because it fooYXsbs , 
on' the idea of the inporativo for Hixon .to sot the date® • ' 

As X7oll, some fool tlvb 'it x-,»ould bo nore .•effectiv’d to have a 
national- civil disoaodionce action later (after Hov. o) for 
txro reasoiis: 1, It. is -a moro natural progression from local 
(Oct. 13) to rogioia-1 (Hov. 6) than having a national action^ 
before rogionel actions j and 2® Placing an emphasis on setting 
tho dato aooror tho Christmas sosson would havo moro polxtiopl 
impact in this country^ 


xo 


8/13/71 ffOFLES COilLITION for PEACE & JUSTICE 

.917 15th St® HW, Washington, D,C. 

• - 202 - 737-6600 




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ited by the U,S. 
Iruction and eco- 


jraKxstan ana axx otn||^wars OJ: aggressxon perpetaMi 
government, the racier, se^rism, environmental 
, nomic oppression are inseparable issues and are an integi^ part of 
'this ’ capitalist, imperialist society, C0NTl®E'ITIAL 


It is clear that capitalism does not meet the needs of most people. 
Our cities are rotting, our food, air and water are poisoned and those 
of us who must work or who wish to t^ork are condemned to machine-like 
boredom or to unemployment. Vie have been robbed of our freedom, both 
personal and political, and our feelings of joy and energy have been 
twisted into powerlessness and alienation, Worse yet, we have all been 
made accomplices in genocide and the technological barbarism that ddm- 

ins+faQ •t'bo •!*'h T via »ST>Tvv>rtf5,« ^ 

struggle against all oppressions. 


We recognize that the small ruling class that profits from these . 
j^olicies of exploitation and oppression will never willingly give up 
xts power and privilege as evidenced by their unresponsivenesi to the 
protests by the people against the war in Indochina, 


Therefore, we believe that only a revolution aimed at ending the 
oppression of all peoples will lay the foundation for a new and just 
society. In order to build a force that will eventually change this 
society we feel it is essential to act together directly, continually 
and disruptive ly against the horrors perpetrated by the Amerikan empire, 

ROLE OF MAYDAY 

We should realize the importance' of tb'e specific role we can play 
in the anti-imperialist movement. To a large extent we have no choice. 
We are not the most oppressed people in the world or even in our own 
society .We’re diverse in that some of us work, some of us go to school, 
some of us hang out but we are not facing immediate extinction or star- 
vation and most of us are not burdened with responsibilities to large 
families or hung upon material things (homes, cars, etc.) To this 
extentwe enjoy a greater degree of freedom and mobility and our lives 
can involve a greater degree of spontaneity, chance, and even danger. 
This is one aspect of white- skin privilege which can be put to con- 
structive use. If we use that very disgusting privilege to undermine, 
the system in ways which other people cannot we will be living our , 
lives in a more meaningful and constructive way than if we wallow in 
guilt, trying to be what we are not. To support and show solidarity 
x-jith black and brown people, poor people, and Vietnamese is ab- 
solutely correct and necessary, but it is not the same as being them. 
The most important role we can play is that of a catalyst for direct 
and disruptive action. 


If 73% of the American people are against the war, if My Lai, the 
Pentagon Papers, prison riots, and lead- poisoned babies have seeped 
into their consciousness, even superficially, it is obvious that they 
either choose to ignore stark reality or remain passive due to feelings 
of impotence of indecision. That is why our role is not only to edu- 
cate but to set examples of and provide channels for action. While we " 
are directing our actions against obvious symbols of exploitation we 
should also be interfering with people’s lives (their business as 
usual) to force them to stop being accomplices in our government’s 
policies. In this sense we should be harbingers of cr^|i,t$ 3 £fC, 4 Uid- .con- 
struct ive chaos, 22 

.-1- V 



X" 







^Pe'bqllovc thai' i.Cjun opn an'SHiy-'n »d an important rol^ in Ch^*n>^ln(^ 
GJid doYGlirpinfj Mrpn»^. 7 » >Tnyd.‘f,y tii’jn IjG' .1 j for itf< eexiofc ;<tti-cudSB j 

and otructuro and ’t5iio io a real -e rH^e iM. I-nl if wcaiion in?oi?o tbfcr/i'* 
BOlvoD and tlinint tboir anei-'jlon in to n5l planning and orcnnlJ'.lnfjt thio 
trill chanr.y., Pnfitur 't.Pmi avo^dlnp: aciirrrr.n!.ati«r* with a soxiat wo 

■faQlloYc that Tro"3Gn oliould T’-poao ii mid fljvht ito If oiotero cwpport 
eaoh other iii tnio atrn-'tlo wj will so'c-j cstrongor and olooor to oaca 
other and oha -'»70 •non rt tho r. -n 

\?o holievo thnl vioAfm idiotrid hfi in the Icaderchip and by ihla t;o 
inGan na lnrul lord i vihir -, not rlrotnd nr-r aid onto ata« l/a ranlf .-!ft Ihnf, 
the edncf'tionrl p too an tlu’Cirrhout Ihla eciioly Ima tracked t-o.nort into 
rolea of poaoi‘7itj<, hotiiine will clirnf^e unlasB women thcsaselvos hreaJ!: 
this pattern and our 'brothoro muot at the onmo time break their pattema 
of authoritarian brliavlor* 

• The liberation of T?rmt?n nuot be erniphasiT’.ed ao an important part of 
the revolutionary Btr’i'r^lo. wcxicm io integrally related to oapitalicsa 
and roi.oicm but we hnow that forma of Booiniicm do oxiot withoui the 
liberation of wamon md eyiy people.. To ooncmitrate^ however, only on 
our cvm oppreocion an wotaon and" to disregard rase iesra and genocide is 
selfish and destructive* It seems' more like the kind of thinking that 
capitalism brocrlc, not rerolutionary thought- ‘’look out for yourself, 
take care of your businosp''- to this re say , ^bullshit**. \?e are 
involved in an internv/iitnal ntruggln for the liberation of all people, 

Ve v;ould like to boo h women *d covjnunication network organized at 
this conference. This network could function both autonomously from 
and along with a corimmiii cat ions netv/ork for all of Mayday. 

7/e would alao like to see spccinl ©ttention paid to the needs of 
ilryday Ymmen with children. ITcver 'should a woman be imable to attend 
a meeting or \7ork on ah action beoauoe she has a child. We should pro- 
vide childcare in our owci comaunitieo rnd for out of town conferonoes. 
Lastly, wo ‘bolievo that J&.yday should include actions against spe- 
cific targets of sexist oppression in its soenarlo for the fall and there 
after. 


- $THI?17TJR15 

On ono level, Heyd.^. should 

mid act1.on-plarn'in(? network that cm croato should b^ made with 

ioua Hovcmicnt groups. TBy thiO wo Scrubs 

all other local ond national groups whose f 

oim-n ar to' ours end whoso tactics are not adverse 

engage iu continura dialogue with those groups so 

grow organically out of a common undcrocanding 

ill© spectrum of psonlo we can po-centially work with is great pm 
4orld! m-ritant pacifist, anti-ocxlDt. ecclogy-orientod, etc). . 

• ri th other gT*ouprj is teposoible unleos wo are oursolveo 

ors^ihL "inVr.r; Kiyftey &n '''’ 

a dlsiuptii^o cctiOii.dll tohington, out i% did not set of fa 
usSnax ,,otlona ground the eo«nti;r, ™ m^y of 

day did hove a local diorwptiTO “tS oKm that ov«y 

tlouXosly aifflealt hy cox 5roh 

time the Fov omen t aecidos to organic© on eiction mrectea againut, 
TOlrorJt heo to or-'-olrt 1 toelf fSxot-OTon fl^d itself;. / 

• - . 7 1 . CO^II^NTIAL 


■ willing to get organ.^|d and take responsibilitjjgkelitism will continue 

I to exist* The time SR come to end self~indulgJR criticism and to 

! actively start solving our problems. If some of the people that have 

; been trashed for elitism had never ventured to play the roles they did 
; -we probably would never have had a Mayday action in the Spring. But,' 

! to be in this position can easily make anyone an elitist. We therefore 

f believe that a non-elitist j non-hierarchical national organization is 
necessary. It should emphasize communication » not a strict pant^ line* 

C0I4!*^^JTIAL 

We have all agreed that the real power of Mayday must st^y vHsth its 
regions. Consequently many of us have had reservations about a national 
j office. It is feared that such a national office j even if it were sup- 

pOtouu uo uonriats Itself to uooi'uxnci tioii of the regions j wuuiu inevit'- 

ably grown to make political and strategic decisions. On the other 
hand, in the interest of efficiency, it seems necessary to centralize 
such things as newsletter production and coordination of multi-regional 
! actions, 

VJe believe that there is a way for these opposing concerns— the 
need for centralized organization and the fear of centralized pol- 
itical power — tobe reconciled. That way is to centralize specific 
, organizational functions but to keep each one separate. For instance, 

■ we see the need for a newsletter (eventual newspaper) office to co- 

I ordinate news and other articles sent from the regions and responsible 

i for putting the paper out. Coordinating offices for multi-regional 
; actions are also necessary. But the staff of these offices as well 

I as their locations would change form action to action. Action co- 

ordinating offices should be located in the same place as the planned 
action, where many people are needed. And people from all the regions 
j participating in that action could be represented, 

i fall OFFENSIVE 

1 In May we moved against \:he seat of political power, Washington D,C, 

The real source of power, however, is corporate capitalism centered in 
New York city. Stock brokers, war industries, oil companies, banks 
and advertising agencies all have their executive offices in New York, 
Such names as Madison Ave,, Wall St,, and Rockefeller Center are known 
throughout the world as centers of Amerikan capitalist oppression. 

But, we have learned from VJashington not to spread ourselves too thin. 

■I Massive actions at all of these targets would insure thafwe would be 
i effective at none. And this time it is imperative that we move beyond 
symbolic action to begin to materially affect the functions of the 
empire. There is one place where all the oppressors are represented— 
the New York Stock Exchange. If 20,000 people converge on that one 
j . building, committed to preventing anyone from entering or leaving, our„. — 
i threat to shut it down would be more than rhetoric. However, we do* 

! not mean to ignore the rest of the city. 

An attack on the Stock Exchange, is an attack on the hear of cor- 
porate capitalism, A massive assault will be necessary to give the 
Exchange a heart attack. At the same time small, creative affinity 
group actions, could, without drawing off the Stock Exchange action, 
cripple the arms, legs, and vital organs of the city. For instance, 
a involving S or 6 vehicles on a bridge, tunnel or highway 

would accomplish moro disruption than hundred of people milling 

tm 3 «> 

' 24 -^ 





A A COKTP^ENTIAL 

aroiuid in traffic, O^vLiirc intfsrf orcnnc* \=rith fwinomal 
of a "buildinf; houoinf? r? mnjor corporation could off fic tivels^'^ ohut xt 
do'v.71 (i.o, , General i'loirtro Buiidln*'^, build j nr'n in Eo-^kof oil cr 0':.nt-:fr) . 
Subv^oy imnotilao {rliiod pbut to free tbo entrancor v?ould focur. on the 
. oppreoeion of poor people, ehlic di f.rm>tinp, nubr/ny exita in tbo Mall 
Street area voultl aid. our moBoiv©' oc v.J on at the Stock Bxchanj^c, 

Mthouj^'h T'o recognise thot the Steak F"ohango io an oc'ent of ell 
forws of opprc.opion-~genral<3(5, rocirta^ ncxioTn, onTiromrsaniol deotruo- 
11 on, and economic rerpt oltot jon--rn or* aware th^-t the modi a will 
autcmnlio ally label our action o.p "nnti“\mr“. .Therefore, we reooiii- 
mniid MHM. ijf'ou fiOtjt riM iin ojiiifu ru I'rajn-’ra ly rscitw an'i uox~ 

lot. inotituti oiu. i c> dourly demon otr at e Mnydi^'o true dlrootion. 

On Satnrdoy, hovanber G 'TP^.S .end TCP.T are ntac^ing their major re- 
gional penne rally in trew York city. They are expecting betw'een 
to, 000 and 100,000 poop! o. Thin is a perfect opportunity to drav.’ 
peace morohors Into disruptive and direct M.ayday actions. K touch- 
stone action on Priday, llovember 5 is ctrategica.lly important. It 
would influence the charecter of the Saturday rally and inspire many 
people dissatisfied with the rally to join us on Monda.y, Pith the 
experience we will have gpjned -^rora Friday and the recruits from 
Saturday '.^e can hove workshops on Sunday that will prepare for the 
larger action on jronda.y, 

MUaGBSTBP SSYBPIP'E QV F.Y. PITY AOTIOIT 
■Friday, 1 Toy, 5 -““B A.M, to P.M, Massive action to shut down the 

the Stock l&:change, 

4'P.M, Gathering at the Tombs (Men’s House of De- 
tention), a blatsnpy racist institution, to express 
oolid.ari-ty ■'-ith the pri.coners, 

Saturday, ITov. C - Iftcrnoon. Join the ITP^C/H?PJ rally in order to 

publicize and gain recruits for Monday’s action* 
Evening, Action against a sexiSt ‘ institution. (If 
this action is not scheduled instead for Monday), 

Gunday, ITov* 7 - Workshops to prepare for Monday*© action. These 

v/ould include planning of tactics and strategj*' on 
how to avoid arrests an^d unnecessory clubbings by 
cops, discussion of exactly what will be needed to 
accomplieh our alms* 

Monday, Hov, S - B .A»M, to .5 P.M. Massive action to shut down the 

.Stock "^ixehange as v/ell .as affinity group actions all 
around the city. 

‘1 P*M, Anti-sexist action, (if it has not already 
occurred on Snturda.y night), 

"TH‘? YOHTC 

Maohl npton D,G. h.nu boon the t.crgct of moot national actions in the 
. prxst, for tills reason, some people believe that to chn.nge the location 
vould mean fewer pooT.lo r^ttracted to a n.ational .action* 'le be! lev© 
the ooponi-tQ is true. The poed ic tab il Hy of a Washington action is 
enough to -turn off both Movement actlvlnts and now people, Doth would 
p'robably br roocc attraclid to a new target as a sign that the Movement 
is thinking creatively and tiding new approaches* Furthermore* the 

* 2 6 CQNFlS^MTIAL 







blacks (neither of wh^| has actively participatej^yith us in the past)* 
The population of New^Pork is more varied | there^re opportunity for 
larger, local participation in the action is greater. \ j 

CONFlyi'ITIAL 

Organizing for an action in N.Y. would also provide increase dS>p- 
portunity for raising the level of political perceptions and analysis 
of new people* 

Though N*Y. has a larger and more brutal police force than Washington 
we must not view this as a major determining factor in the choice of our 
location* We choose our target cities based on our politics not the 
size of their police forces. Otherwise, we would go to a two-cop town 
and seize power immediately (a wonderful affinity group action;* fur- 
thermore, we know from experince that (Washington always calls in the 
National Guard and paratroopers to supplement its police force* Mayor 
Lindsay and Commissioner Murphy of N,Y* would .be most reluctant to tarn- 
ish their liberal veneers by calling in the Guard. 


(With revolutionary love, your sisters and brothers. 


of New York Mayday 


“(When tyranny is lav;, revolution is order 


CONFiBENTIAL 


,1 


CONFMENTIAL 


RjSVOLliTXOM iRZ CAUCUS PROPOS, 



Xlio H aaion Jcua, tho Viotna'.noao and. all our revolutionary aiatera 
and brothora around the x;orld are v;agin }5 n atru^^f^lo for their libera- 
tion, Wo fool that tho boat uay tro can materially and spiritually 
aid our aiatera and brothora intornationally ia to wage a class x;ar at 
homo homo to liborato tho opprossod imasos in Americ?i, Wo sons e a 
prevalent otti'budo in this conforonco that donioa and ignoroa the 
working class in our own country, Tlao shit that just carao down from 
Nixon will ultim toly hurt one claas -- Tho working class which is 
uix-uud^ uApuriuiiuiuii uiuauivu iuiu-.iipl<-»jiuuiio facos the actuality of thou- 
sands moro joining thoir ranks, 0?txo black aid third world pooplo will 
be the 'first to got vo'jpod on. 

As rovolutiora ry Jows wo mus t go first to our ovjn people to 
organize. In ardor to vxork ti th our paoplo we must bo one with themo 
VJo must first regain tho part of us that wo havo denied* Wo must 
broak tho myths that Jewish aid no- •- Jewish poQ 3 }le ba Vo inc-Oil-c itod, 

Tho myths that all Jews are rich,- Tlio myths that force Jewish 
vromon, in solf-hato to got nose jobs, V/e must Smash iikxLx5±xxx3^1t 
anti-semitism on all fronts. Wo must fight -tie lies that the ruling 
class has porpotuatod to pit minority groups against oach ether vrhioh 
rosi 1> a in B1 cks and Jows, Irish and Italians fig ting each other 
rather -than the real enemies. In p rtiouli r, wo must fight against 
the racism inculcated in our pooplo*, 

vie, as Jows havo a lot of werk to do in our oorimunitios. Our work 
is not only amon tho young, but dL so tho old , who aro oho of the most 
fucked over members of our society, and tho middle aged who are made to 
fool in a state of limbo, 

PrixD ipally, we, as Jows, must show our people w oro our real 
self -interest lies, VIo fool that this is not inclusive only of Jo-wish 
Ro’ua lutionrios, but that Irish, Italian, Polish, etc, ro-wc lutiora rios 
must begin to relate to tho noeds of t>. oir o\m cowiiunitios.. 

As Jewish revolutionaries wo fool tho need to vrork w th our gay 
bro hers ard sisters in dealin; with thoir oppression aid to struggle 
agaiiB t sexism on all levels, Wo supportgay mon aidvoie n in their- 
communi-b^r actions ai dwill deal with tho oppression of Gy I© oplo in_ 
our Joviish corimiunitie s andto get rid of guy, sexist, racist aid aiti- ’ 
soomitic oppression in all communities. As revolutionary ntionalis-ts 
wo re© gnizo tho nood to elimira to all reactiora ry aspects of our 
c\ilt-ir e in our oxm, pooplo, and to retain and ro-Vive the revolutionary 
and humanitarian olnmonts of o-ur stoh n heritage. 


¥e propos© local actions for the fall, as x-rell as a la tional 
action bo tako place in Now York, Tho local actions should attack 
targets specif ical3.y rol ting to the needs of tho particular coimnunity. 
And for the Nox■^ York action, w-e propose the Wall Street bo a target as 
sDCsgmk.w.^xn.'g. prime target of ' capitalism, V/oalso propose that ono of ■ 
tho targets be tho Russian embassy to free our Jewish sisters aid bro-bhoi 
. Tha oppression of all pooplos is- the bus ire ss of tho mover© rt » 

In Now York £p ocifically -thore is ala rgo Joxiish oommunity that we 
mudt st.nrt rob ting to# A right shift t end ore y .on the part of 
tho Jewish populi CO is duo to tho fact ih at tho loft has aystomoti- 
cally i.gna* od o-ur op->arossion, V/o must tako this fight ax-ray from 
tho right xd.ng p JDL, and placo it as a prior i-by in tho loft# Jo 
boliovo tho accent aboud bo takesn axray from ©migration to Israol, 
and bo restated tha.t theyJoxra iiiy-Russia afo iri the vangra rd of a 
revolutionary fight in Imperial is-t Russia to for their rights ef 
solf-dotormination' as a -<minority group, along with the'^sb^r 
— ^ — -^-nTvy»P>.q.qnd iYi-iy>ry» It-ic s of Russia# _ . CONFJim^IAL 







MOVEMENT OVERVIEW 


Stat© of tho KatiOR ar»A tho I^piiro 


C0^ TAL 



A« thrt ftcouomy spiral© dotmra.rdl> memploy'roai t:-!©©® tmpreccd'aitcdly in tho faco 
ot oearing inflatiojcif tmiial roxarosslon ard opreosion rioo to a oroscondo 'bo'^ 
at hono and abroijdtthG Innlcruptcy of -Kia United Statca and Its i3p0r5.a.l eoonosy 
bcaoQ© l«or«anin<|ly> glorin^ly cleas? to ovor^gratitoj: oE pooplo VjorM»dd6> 

PM tJia Anerioan milng olea© at Liat ‘bofdn© to jpy the prioo for dcoadco of iR“ 
■porxtKJ. aeciaiJOp Gcoao:5ic saiig'Aaiilon anci piicsiy 'prosporlty* cupported ti>f tho gc£a- 
crutoh of tho oconoKy# 

Faood tooth vitii a saturation of intorxial mrlscd;?: and & declining rate of 
ial economic exponaton over since ■Wis clos© of World Karl (together giving riao 
to tho Groat Boproanion a deomlo later) » and trith a not decline In cnplre’e 
ccopo, potjor and peefitatoility In ■the isako of Horld War II, Amorioa md 
SiTropaan oHsnt atetes haro for more tiiaa a decade vaxsd large on the lucrative 
** conspicuous 'Haste** of tho tir® nhieh aJ.one pulled this cotmtry out ^ 

the Great Bapressioa, aj».d riomentflril^f kept it therso IfoHt tiio crutch is "broken | 
tl'»© ta!>r economy, wea at the fevoi?”plioh of ■'TlctaaB, suffices only to eonttau© 
inflation in the. face of a dopreesion which even toourgeois soonoaisto concedo 
any rival that of th-? thirties* 


The liaperlal wars nw raging a"broad, especially in Yietmm, are rjianifeatly 
faiHng, even in lailitaxy term, as tho ® greatest power on earth* is gradually;, 
forced, inch Inch, froa tho soil of Asia, Africa, and Latin Aaorica* Poshaps 
KOTO importantly, tho iapsrial effort is flagging socially, as Jimxlca^a rapa«> 
clous appstito for profits, whippsjd on In fruateatlon at its military d 0 bacles,>' 
reveals &v&r »oro clear3y tho t»nu5 mt»re> of U* S» laporlslisa, generating e»' 
0 ver«rislng level of s-brug^o, "both at hoBio and a"broad* 

Faced Hith this ©ecal&tlo«o tho Imparlalistc Increasingly drop -She *li"k*3ml 
gsod-guy® 0 acika of th© Keanody oca in thoJx futile desperation to ertush lito^r** ’. 
atdon sirugglo© and rcstoro their lost dof»inl.on and profits tgr main forcoa 
Yet the rise of domestic repression and is^sriol oppression is hslng and must • 
aluaya "b© aot,o»3'E;«rGd and defeated "b/ iaorecuaed rniitolllsatlon <*f tho Htoeraitoit 
forces o 


State of tho Hovsaoat ' 

Shattercsd,, split, dl©QoriU.iscd and eonfuaed? tho Movoaent in thi.s country is !»■ 
an aT^'-s?mlly poor positi.on to effsr such a no&ded answer in kind, Iho history > 
of the Movement’^s decliao and "hceak^up need not "te) outlined here, "but it is irs« 
psrativo to racogasiaa the med for placing top priority on the building of a 
aaw rovolutiomiry vehicle, tmllko now clearly in oi^t. 


%e fractionaliBSi,tioa of tho U.S* Movomont has 3.©d us to "be manifestly Isolatod 
and Inoffectivo, ifholly unable to m© and "baiM upon the energy generated in 
the sporadic actions ^hich have markod our recent history} most intolerstoly, tro 
have ovon toeen una"bXe to offer a vieiblo and cffoctlv© anew<^ to the open surdor 
of our otm txcothers £^d siatora at Kent, Jackson. State and ©Iseuhere* 


29 



CONF30ENTIAL 


Within tho wo Itiv© provon to d&iil tritli tondensies whieh hold 

hack prof^resa and t'-aia1^in tho Kavr.acAt at ite: carrontj lotf ©bbo Prirary c.mnQ 
ouch tondmicies l£? tho profoTOd lack of cieal toloxatto© ©howa 'xy/ a&n'^ of 
tho Mov©D..'mt*s prof ,:'Jced*lcr',doro*» Tncsn oicn'^nta haw iesued formal. stat^r-’Oats 
and Kcltton uanifootoss of nuah nanlfcrit isiv,o3.&3janoG ovori to freely acd ipra- 
tuj.toualy otalo, on a nnfoor of oocaslono, • that 'tarothora and ointoro holdin^j 
vioTJc. contrai*^if to tboir ot?n can os ily bo *a;;Gat“ iyrovooatours^ ( cf» XJ« 0»ihiyds<-y^ 
g,r-'«tica1. fovr?rrd cigixed “P/ \ |)» 


Tiiic vioioutsly r.'-ota'Kan caa only provo utterly dsairuotiva of tho 
kind of united Gfrorts ao deox-nrately needed in this tlno of OTnPortiin5.1? oroat* 
cd by laporial or Isis * and unfortunaioly oontlnuos to appear in ever noro aovsX 
foris^p nost recently in iho pag^oo of tho Soattl© N©*r A^ier3>can MovoKent paper » 


Tno Future of Kgyday 


“Eic crislo of our ilses* and tho cofabinod tlixeat end opportunity that tliia cr3.“ 
«ls effortls to liberation forces worldvfj.doj togalher de Rap d the creation# dove- 
iopsiont. and growth of an ongoing rovolutlonrsy vehiolo in this country. At the 
very least, tlio confvnion and dloorientatlon in tho Loft, said oopacislly anong 
New LMt groupings, arises end flourlt-hea precisely out of iho absonoa of such a 
vd^iclei tho effort devoted by the ruling class to th« x*d®°®®cal destruction of 
oinllar efforts in thy pmit Is no accident ^ 

t^hetber this coni' oronco atteapte to mice Mey day into ouch a continuing force, 
to up to all of U 0 » An honest dnoirc And deicrainatlon to struggle openly and 
sincerely asiong oursc3.vcs for truly rovolutioiriry prograros and appropriato ac* 
tiona to IcpleKunt pro,^>'sri39 together rith a firm coardtssnt to follow 
throu^i Oil conelusiono collectively arrived at, tdll be on essontial pr®oondl«» 
tlon ? ‘viable political fuiusre ‘for Itayday cad the broader Movemont. 


All r-"dnt*^ <j!c' v1,o?7 must be heard and considered la the tradition of conajadeshipj 
t?o pfier duo discussion# adopt a3,l truly progressive prograica and oonslu- 

sivoiy reject thee© vi^iich load ua into rsforsfdsFa and oo«optst3,on* 


Ilayd.!^y hiis nevor boon conceived—ly ita own ffl©mbsrs«««as anyone's ^yonth arm® , 
ari m ©list rontet the depand^ncy which cuch a dsfinlttoa Ixceods, in ord.er to 
oh??^t our otm 3n4apcMoat rovolutionexy course, whila r ©mining open to criti- 
cisa froja other parts of tho Movoraont. 


A a ua Kov© s<head, we raiat *l:al £0 pains to lacvo in directions colleo lively rocog« 
nlsed ae progrsaRlvo or?A fruitful, uhilo reaainlng on gwsa?d against dogsatic 
linas i5ut for-wri.rvl for wbatovor ?rol3.«lntontion©d reasons by sldllod* leaders® , 
polished ‘pon&j .OK.d aayoiio'c tJ0ll.«firicyri0c4 press. 

hfeunitod orgprdsatioiiallly, the rovoluttonacy Moveaoni tfiU ovontually perish# 
Lifiunited in rojig'n, itii th© fac© cf ir't«rial crisis, it will perish alacst 1,r®©- 
dliit^ly. At tho aaiiiO biao, the very theu^t of an ultinate unity of tho /*Keri“ 
can Iff t io inooncoiv'vAl© witliout a protracted period of unity in action, of 
Aeve3,o;ping -th© coaaon fx^isrlcnoc of working ioge-Uisir# The HABITS of united ac- 
tion, rather than- intorncoine tJ»ajfnrQ, auot be dovslopcd throu^ a firm coniKiet- 
nsxit now to greater nr ? dogreos of interaotlon, autual support, and do~ 

fsiKiOjif $.*o arc ‘to withstand ■iho increasing ravages of reactionary vlolonc© and 
coao bo grips xdth our hlGtofid rolo# -y' 

30 

2 - 






CONF>ZlJSNTIAL 


.H© fool tbjit no h&vo u-aiquo eaniriteitiom.'s to nsJm to the Ansadcsn Rev^ution} 
but wo mko no cla3.n. to a monopoly &'C y&w3u*tloK.«:y thoufbt^ or of rovolntlon** 
lots, nor do no harbor vain’I'dsc;-of-«jmthi* tlieorica about dangors of conta-*. 
yalnatlon by as£>oc5.ation niti't othor c and /pjoups# Wo offer iSio hjytd of 

solidarity thro«^i the roceliaaian of tha ujiltGd front j, to every sesrioua r^^;volu» 
tton:«ry greaping in Aaoric.n» and wo t«o p;‘optiXcd to open discussions non to rcs» 
aliKO solid working rolaiionehips at the o.i'S'lloot passible dato© 




;'J „’,Vf 

{fiiT 


Ibn T'TATS CF NAflON, faced wltl\ the griJn altornatlves of iruperial collapse 
or fc/iclst rcAction, provides both tho inpotus and the opportunity for truly 
:r evolut.t onary ^action in tho present periodf tiae STA3?E OP THE MOVEJ*ISKT, broken 
end dleorganissedn aakes such action Koll«»i^ Inpossiblo without swoepiag change 
in our own ranks* Tho tsoQendouB onorgy of MAIDAY# alboit still in its InfaRcy? 
offers tho lono poaoibility of a real answer to th5.s diloaffla* ifost ie up to 
us. 


STATEMENT OF PURPOSE 


He fool rai Imediato need to state eonorotely our thoughts on tho direction tho 
Aaerloen Movoiaent is talcing* ©specially iiay^y. Soae of the paopl© ue have 
tallfcd with exprossf]! tho idea thjst Mayday is an ongoing organiBaticas ir* tho 
aacHor to our npscial problem . He fool that l^ayday must bo placed in its proper 
historical perspc>ctivo® Tljtlo trill allow tta to insight into our presont and 
future Ro«ds. 

Wo v},ow Ksydsy sus « vehicle, the pwrpaso of Kliieh is to nov© revolutionary youth 
to a higher, co-ordinated level of struggle* By co-ordinated, w© do not moan e 
•party line** W© scan an organ! v.ation that futtetions as a ml ted front of revo- 
lutionary poeplo whoso poHtical goal is a socialist revolution, but whose con- 
stituency ’/arli?5 froa pacifist to those who have adopted the tactic of araed 
struggle# 

. Uo feel that the imjority of the people who nro inter sated In Mayday share the 
• same basic ideas and goals on tho issues of r'acisa, sexioa, ago and power chau« 
vinlfffiSa Becauso of the?*© cosimon bonds, we muat make it clear that w© ars a white 
rovolulionaxy youth uovosiynt Kitii a dlrcotlon and our own perspective, and not a 
y«uth -ixa of any organijsation such PGBJ or SVIP* W© fool we Ernst strive to 
point tmt the dopcssatio power structure of tho *lcgS.tlaato aoveaent®, how they 
have co-opted New. loft issuosj for their own benefit, and expos© -the reviBioniut 
politicpj of tho ©Id loft, to Imtscs that white rovolutionaoiy youth Eove forward 
poIiticE:,iiy. 


He feol Uiat tlio nan© f^ayday carries with it oortain limitations which aust be 
denounced If we ard to cove a revolutionary body, with different ideas on tactics, 
forward® 

H^day carriea wttii it tho sti^x^ of noh-violonco in tho pacifist sense* The pow* 
or of Maydey is to f Ion fren tho bottom up* This was not tho practise 

ENTIAL 
— 





of tho H{V 3 hinston c^ff.leo dticlng pKC-3/It<?-Ac'y i«7 ttotioa poricd/ Ilofc eaS^r t?«»9 
pooplo with a Ron-p;'.clf 1st Idoolo®^ toM to ct 3 &^ Gfray fecn 3)0 or “fcs lak-alcd & 
hut tho concept of rogtorr^i powor t:afj at <iU£ 3 tioa tjhoa KlI:o tsiol t® <? 20 > 

nlso a hU.t!?;J,ng cotlon to eoeut?® K» X* taotic-r^J. 


WnMFWR STATFMENT 


”Thfi I'lovGPiont io Guppoocd to "bo for hunan Hheratloa* hot? ooiae tho ocjitlitioa of 
woineu inside is no hoitsr than outside?'’* 0o have seon. a roiasrkahlo laols of eon* 
soiotisnoss on the psrt of I5ayd4iy as an orgeniEatioas as»i sono of tho pooplo ia it 
to any of tho issues that affect uonen© fhio nuot obax}go» hiitj fron rcaist* 
anoe to chanso tliat wo havo foltj it trill ha a hard fi^t» 

fboro has "boca ®uch soid-sm in tho hrief history of I-feydgy, as ‘blatant as issy on 
k2x>& Street* f^Jhat is even nore indicative of tho overall problem is tho (eon* 
eciouo or unconacioua) decicion to virtually exclude poor and worldag fron 

tha oohf aronoe la Atlanta© Poor woaoa do not havo tho acana to travel for seven 
di^ys** ospeoially tTith chlldronti and what working ^romn can got ‘a soven day ’wools- 
ond* to go to a conf orenco? 

n^syday has not naly ‘bson sexist in straoturo, but in its politics to i^o extent 
that tho politico wore tmcle':x in aH aroaas Ifeydoy failed^ for tho aost psrt* to 
reiaio to poor psoplo# Third t?orid pooplo® werkorsp gay people and to weaon* This 
hftSt, in partj bi:©n di«e to -tho fact that u5mt ran stated to ho -^e poldiica of 13%^ _ 
day was rerlly tactics and that feero was no clear politleal analysis* '^o fool 
that it io inportant to define our politico and, from that analysing oisr sho3:t- 
touK and long range goals© Ovxs tactics tiiH flow froa thiOo 

H 

In ord.or for m to "ba a rolovsnt fore© to a greater constitnonc^g wo mast analy-* 

00 and corroct the ooxiGn and olitleaj tho fcdluro to serve mny psoplo* ^ear© 
ha's hnfiR olitisa felt in the failuro to comunicato « even mong ®ilejday people®, 
andg fron -IMSf a failmro to reach out to otlicro© Ui1^ no effective corMtinica* 
ilottg ihoro has boon frustre,tloa» espsoially assoag psoplo who have criticised 
soKo of liie decisions and actions of Mayday* 

yo feol -&at ihoro h&vo ‘boon no channels for oritioisas the lack of ary nethod <f 
cor.ffi5.taaicationgGV©n as ‘brjsic as an organised contact Hctg has provonte-d erlticisss ; 
by peoplo inside Kayd?yj and tho *faleo loyalty* lidiich put soe© l^ayday people oa- 
th© d&r©ris5.vc and prevented oponnsss to critloioia froa ’outside® people* Xa this 
r;ny> the- in^lvidualf in Ilayday cut thausolvcs eff to grouth or change ia tho arsa ■ 
of SfjjElan and in adl ether areas of otruggloo 

As i^oriong mo feol t!mt a wonon’o ccatact notwork ntist be cot up to insure our o~ ■ 
pe?>n<?Bs to internal and extomsl criticism and 'to serve as the nmsm of orrhang* 
inn fjld.ll8* idcsEs and infoamatioa* This could promote growth on all levels and 
would Ecdto pcsoiblc coc^ination of actioiis* 


In oyilos to deviilop our analysio of our political futiscog wo will need to in * 
cre our ^lero are mny ways of leamingi women have had. much suc- 

* • 32 • CONF^^^NTIAL 


V < 


w W CQNFjiPiLNTIAL 

' jfsc.*55 tains s:-'^il«; 50 ‘C'i!yi coprelC”’“'n'»''n«^i.n5j!f 

a£r^.nat oc3ticjn« t’o iToul t‘'»r-.'3i ri-.n "fes o^’rAeA oj&i kwo 

it MocsTnl in i^-^lrdns gws G^?rn©f«.*^rrnc?n « 2 l*?;r'’r*iea c? •tho i:ho3.cj oax4'i?diBt 

A«3 tjonsn, tro hava i?cm,i l'o Ica'cn r.oro i?rca easli ml ei»j:c9l7<^3 - 

thc’;s wo ootaM no fec::!xl a rWlon losiwog Xn c= «?i‘'>r^5,T,f^s;C'5.5 no?i«rjit- 

lat oottins iw hr.ve :1 »;'i3.6t. abrnt cer^ii'iMGailia -3 tri-iii n'r nirilszai' ml 
nwoi coa-«)lraio rlicxovnr^ no c»o* 

l-hilo e©rociOTjarir''ri“ 2 rdrdr's in i'i ni’ct Is ilio Hralt ccc ©i%? f'QhX.vX''&i'.?ih 

•* « •'» *• •* . t, » M - ^ **■ *>^ 

iNf^ *•*;?, > %r WV fj-l '*«a ai«*i ^i%iM>*****j^ w****, v«vk. 

tioi, acrdEs foins ©inc pom-^icn, rwb Ijo r,s Gc-jecaoivo e^5 ncacnr.-sy i© r,ooei:^25.i3la 
■ what wo «Jot out to do« Ulth tdx of feolx fr.tilto, tiia Kcjr <?vly actlrm 0 £sa 
tcaeh tis pnssy If ro ta?© tfiHins to Icarai tJo OGonot# hc.t-wor, ho|H^i 

Xcom frcn mxy motion wialoso wo seoogpaiao that wo don*t havo ony rccsio fox^soXa 
that woJrco uo oorsaact nutonatlcalls'* ^Jo nsiat fcavo the hwsility to hcas? tm»» 
dcwotaxl eritinicnia Uo Iiavo to ma3yso ositlcioEi ws&t if it ic ooriaootj raJ o 
C'7orcy effort to choaso aesoasSlaciyo 

Xf wo dovoUjBiSJ a dear olaso amiXyoloj exd roleto that to wcaoa^D isiauciSj than It 
trill 'bcocaio T^saoiblo to ®s:n*’'*‘i53*3 tlio roat offcotivo idads of a&tioao in rhioh cine 
oiotcra wild sartdoi^ato in tliolr ov-ia intercoto On tho o’&or hasd} if oon« 

'iiawoa to rcaoJx ealy tho waiveraity otwdenSja, thoa it oaa wovsr oorro tho seeds 
cf tho rajerity cf tlio psc-r anl wo::?ldiis wos^loa 

Cortaialy^ wo awot fl^ht for hc?dth earo as tho ric^t of a3d iiOO|>3.o an^. w^s nwjst 
l\Xgo iho op^.oid o|wrojOica of woaon "fey i^i© “disease systca*#' asc4 

fsreo nicsrtloa on dca.and citi froedeni of scn^al ospjcssloao tJo eesl bo ha treated 
na hi-nen 'boisjso tho *x*^’efcca.lOKals® Tiho ora attuned to sea'a’a me tJe siust d« 
30 tfea oXc'-3G ar;frGsaloa cf trao1d.»s in '&o ochooSsg th« end to lirdtailoa 

&£ oyi»r&njiltica for wonaa, ai?d for rolor.'iats real cox education* t'lo nisst &Xbq 
fleht for tho oKd of ogpeccsioa of wonea ntn in iho £s^2y otrwotwrog iiOeeaa 
oni tho fGjni3y otamottro aa xiq now kncu? ito 

Itcao r*pc35i:io oxac|>3,e0 ora an illsssferation ef tho foot ‘Siat thc-ra can nowr ho 
a Ghan^o in tho lirco of woaoa tsitiil thoro is a rovoltitioasry Qlisy3.gd 

In iho cerdoty iteolfp feyt tiio 2i'b:mxb3.on of wonon tdll (said mat) ho &■ part' of 
tl?,e Idhosatios of dl igooplo* th esardot a^^co with theso wotsoa who^ that 
tir;a lo 'tho cnony end that esny worw^n io at Icaot a potential al1y« 3>S is truo 
that non who rcfwso to ctsfwg^lo cc^Tiit^'b tholr own GOJdsa or who re-fuso to resog"" 
Bin© tho oj^Qs-sivoncaa cf tho trrdi'idonal Eale*fcEalo roles awrit to otruA^ied 
BG?dasts not ao wooplop lat fed’ their c^tioaa* Thia aH>Xi®s to o-if oaHcd®iaovc« 
Dont p.oa® an nwsh as to- capitalists a Xt lo also' trap that whilo Koohcfeiler and 
*Mo® trifo Cw oppressed ty ^o3j? ri£jld. sox rol®a» they ara hath still iho 
Bz^-r/o ’'O'cea CGO that it io poselW.o t© have aa Gsoaord© rcvolvttica tiltlmi 
crJi.i?'-: t>r) snprcsrdoa ef v&rrLoa os ireaoay Shis wcaM Vo ca insc-iplete r^volatimi 
Xa llT5.-ra,tJ.c4 atsmsslea in tho world 4^1?y, the®® feavo Vcoa sarsy mch izjs.ess^loto 
il.Qtftricoi Xt B6cra that it is isp^c.ol'blQ to h&vo a cosiploto roui4wticiu3ay vis- 
tory in b. world d 0 id.E 3 >tGd ly iisporlallDS* 

Facreferoj it ia acocouary to wa:p a ctre-Sils ‘k^-d &n rcvolatic«r>vy ar-alyois 
feewe^is rav&lntiemsry c^^dop Xt ia ccmnUaX ■J&at wcisoa tfd:o a ieadins relo la 
Icfinin^ *ihcsQ ia tho GtsaotiE-rs of Ifeyday* floacn will no lowgor moapb Hid role 
&f cawicoo (rc24 osswilliG^y) ia tho o^ora of thia®So Uo nirot Vo wdtod weaoip 


CONF] 


ITIAI. 


i 


coni^^ 4 ;i^tial 


lofisliv* ovs? lolltlca rrii, ooHtei‘C,= c.-cli oth«?, 1i-o^i5.a5 sr-rv^lnmoa* 

iry £lf^-fe(^» t?,< 3 tico rr-y iKsl^^to rCO. )?3f3."AM3itlc59 £ 20:1 psSfiea 

iny. Vo tJicn tsulto ri*^ eJl D-^^£3lo^ea tho cx^n e£ pslltlcws 

)iOy OCT ooH&'Jdliy o$.vo iho uo^ctaJJ. 

^ ^0*^ fxcn "5Tao tol Csalio Try l'^(P f?lcWo cSconWa 

f02 Gas’oiio \±iO iimfki •to is2l»CTstoK^ too 2 i.voo i:ovaiQi»<i us^.oa a*ji too fjroKCi^ 

^ novCToaati u'jsie> 


CLASS ANALYSIS 


A 2o*?C!£5Eii*^©2i ©£ too olaoo iss.'tCTo o£ AsicsJlcaa cceloty eoi^lci trlto on issdCTst^- 
filBS of hot? to aot afeott-!} it io jscecssaosy to rend ^ovolistlojsassy ehossso© tiitootxt 
thio wo Tjcsono ho^olcooly nijeoi in too i^osacs of safoKia and olcs'tosal polit 5 .oOd’ 

Oev oooioiy coatair'i too c 1 ''J 20 qs« Oao tibicla ema too-acans of pj^inio-tlca trat do 
not CTcato t?ealto8 too tonrsooloiloo ^0 ■bOCTgooioio is divided into too scotl^jar-® 
5ho Icsreeot io too oosrstomto Kono^oly toieh cwm and oontoolo too Ea^ori^sy , 
of too ncono of prcdotloa oai, toorc^Q^Oj controlo ccyay wc^IcsKSe fho srotit "fco'ar^ 
gC'05.Dio is too dcolisias in too proocat siaso of Eoaopoly cs,x.ito«1i.saj “fesiag ■ 
too cEaXl caiitolloto« Tao wonlilns elaoo io all toooo who nrat coll tooJl 2 IATjct# 
Tkda dcco not 5.nply ttot toexo oro not {^co.t division’s in too wor&lag olasa® Tho 
ve-i'Ida-r; ©lacs ia dividcl "by too fonoco of ^.oioa, cosdcsj aad too r^to too oo-_ 
ocillcd'’^t:13.o ol£*oo®o ^Jhio eyto innllco toot tooso lo’oeoial noMHty^jca aUli-’- 
ty to pall yoaraolf ap ®T^ your 'b^at otoape® (about ca pocisl'blo litcarally as fig- 
urativoly)© SJiio idea of oao largOp middlo cl^o hcuo ’boon «a©i to hldo too tau© 
aattsco of too clo^o cyatcii ef too seoiotyo It io Ixaplicd that tooro io m rcial ' 
ruHas olGSC-4'otst ’ujvpCT eIMIo ol^ico* and a fow fontaaatss*- %* estoaslea, thoro 
io m oao to hlano for naotr^plcyriGatj reprosaions ispcridliop- sfssicjaj end 

.too ayriad of otoCT capltalfestie impired plaga^Ks that cs:© •visited too psopl«? 
cj^opt too oiddlo ©laco voter that doesn't tCTn cut# fhio unhdllovahlo boss is 
ovea porpotrjSrted T^ ©ursolvco whoa ns refer to too siddlo olasco la too slaploct 
pccolhlo •torKOj a nenhor of too uerSlns olass is ©no who oolls his/hor lg>3rs ro<» 
c:ardlcos of wliat fora it toliooo Tm^o in m roanoa for "too anemption toat tocr© 
io a Taroad class ■fcotcosa two mcCil oxfecaca er -toat thsro ic &s3yr tssnio aoMlity, 

In Aaorica tedsyo too xvist mjorlty of too posplo aoll toelr lahar cad croj to«s-o» 
f crog norldng claoa# • Xho scaialirsatioa of too tnimerdsip and control too nesms 
of preIVi©tieh lo ia too ohjscttvo Dolf-intCToat of 'too w^eldas sSansi Oars iOj ' 
tfeCTcfcrot G claoa otm^gloe' 

^10 npeoific eonsiitooHt^ of Ksyday iop for too nost.--partj a ncstlea cf too worB:« 
it?3 clDfls-apsoificGlIy tMto youth# 2 itocr they cro uerhia^ class up front (in 
friOtsricsg offices, oto*) er tooy aro wcridag claoa in trais 3 ng (ctndsato) or wo3>» 
Iduf; olaas ia yaltiaij (msaplcycd)i Recnsedlocss, wo (sro ohjociivDly werklag olass. 
Pnrtoor, wo aro prcdcaiEG&'fcly g whito gsm^u iMo is not as wo nicht wish it to 
ho, hut io oh^ootivoly truoa ®ilo io 00 in •cior? of •toeso t^o willed “befcrcB psr- 
tlcli’G.tcl In, QK .1 havj uorhed efter too E 9 ac^onoe ‘ 



servo tJio xxdXng claos® vl»t th®f ar@e 

A olaB® Rtrosgl® is aocMS^ i© glv® •&« ol«liT imd 0 t«o«gt.h ptsEfos© ■ 

that Is n©c®s0sry fo>r real roTOlttMcuaay oht»g®e Xi is tJi@^ @alj fom &£ sfcw^gla 
tbu,t rwiatffl 0€H5|rti0E twA xaf&miBm bJ5«tae of its ’Issi^t coaesxBiEg ih® real . 
soar©® ©f tji® protsloa iMefe it 1® oostfireaioA®' It 1® tb® ©laly feialjl® eloar 
©TOO^!i to ©xplsda th® »®#i for eoasitAi iatoraal snA ©xterssal sirtiggl® t@ rid xm , 
of ^ -fe© ©jmo®r tbict iafost® us ©wr ©ocdatye' ktA It 1® tb® ©n3y aaalysl® 

■balMa for tfeo tiltiaai® struck-.© to wrest state pw@r fros the Klosd ®oak©d fe&sls 
of th® ©apltaliot® ia arasd ls«iirr®ctloa« 

Fljsalljs th® ©lass is ow liak to ita-^ tatermtlonal otnj^lo oa'» 




0oO2» mA ol®«s in Baitaroi Our ®la®a amJ^is links tia dir®otly to th® ©vwall ' 
atxtiggle in Rhloh ta&elom oaFitallsa anst nXtlmtoly 'be,d®f@aty.e ; 


TACTiCAL CONSIDERATIONS 


It awat ts first seen tho BQ aotioiw xo|sr©B®at«d a stop «p la l^sa 
level of Boveaoat Althow^ thora havo 'bsoa ©aallar va^?gEard aotioBS '^n 

the Koveaoiit (Bay® of Kaga)» and eapealnUy awch ftirths^r admaoed stra^X®® 

in the fhlrd ¥orM ( ■'d:s© ®oeK® la Cairo# Ilia)# the ®enor41 level of stntssX© c«a» 
ba oeasidered Kadocd bj this eotlon di© to ti't© @l®o of th© ElUtojat action, trlth 
to tha typ® of poopla that aarrled them out. The reason for tfe® ^v«a* 
aeni to aovo ®iroisgly a® it did dTiEiRg the K®.y mtiem xsm not a real fear 
fckst m w«mM carry ©at our threat , ^in foci# that day? hut rather th© rfc 3 liK.a* 5 Ji©n 
bJmt till® typo of diroot action oouM Tbeceiao th© ®od© of th® nert fesf ye,?r< 35 « %o - 
tecancr&tio seraory of ih© faatasiio gcotith «f ih© p©ao@ aovemsnt (and in •■ 

th© aif?.^ of It®' Kard\©03) la long and the ruling cIas® mm what c CSV's of 

m umc& &lm to r*ic‘.ec’*d®3©'«tlii® threat eould h© carried out ia the rtxf nsar fut'oro^ 
CJius, it is for s two-foM ressea that lls^day mat ocmtinu&llsr adv®«©® th® lorol 
>f th® cla®® stmggls 3?M,ch it teg^a Mith la BC, %iss®ily to present to th© pso- 
^3-0 a viahl© aitorEativ© to mxxhm that sx© ignor®! sad^ tmll-sMt lih-wla tf&o 
»lk e^rfe &i both ®5.d« of th®lr aou-ths §M. s^^oondlyp to atrengthoa Itaolf 

'jy osis'blieliing a ©ttpport ‘tes© timmg th® p®opl@ by oiar &msxpl&cy Shes® 

?®nsoMi,Cir®# of ooure®, smtuelly ffiopportctlv®® 



7 «» ' 35 


■ Of 'ifeo'M 
conM^eutial 


'^•' H. 

' i,- .i ' 







,i hm p«lltl0aJ.ly oenowlv&'a* Tmtxm «a Hait» of 

TMilos «© asOT©!^' ln®trmeats. ««?«*! to aeSisr© +li@ ®i®8 ®f th» 
what^var polltlo-ad mmom dieta,t«» -Khe stailen Mso dletai© tl's® ia®« 
7 e,oii«», thtm^ Kiu^t l?« r<?«.soimbl0 KltM.a th« mnpn of 
tlior© AotiM «tisit m ih,.lfi.^ bm tfe.?* word dj.sot«'di0ae®« The 

• a .*. A.t. .. 6 •* _._:k > ± ■% ... > “I -I .■ j. \i 







1 

% 

I 

1 

I 

1 

1 

I 

» 

1 

m 

1 

g 

i 

B 

i 

I 

1 

I 

1 

1 





mx® f’rsx&xwi.uar wesrit mw wsaraj?vK«ia'® « jwswwbi «i « « 

'.Wf XO 

a Pi.rd.mm. nm^ idiexoais tha tm<n of tho ia0tio «?f ®0D*g of eo«r®@9 % 

roflsois that 

i®plioatS.on» Thi@ stlgm of mfeli^leBoo towards th® non-xoprewOTl 

;o,tiT09 lHogal . 

aTmt®?a showM 1cm s?®iffiovad lyr tha aatetltetloa «sf tfei® toralnoloitr r« 

mistaaossi. dls<» 




XTOAMgSe An wosi renoxxjixag oiac wtwb wo ax® axoo ojiarxs 

.yxB® •owr 3.mv“ 

«mtlewfs ».4 tto aoniag of ®wr »at3.onr3« U© «® no l&isgor disobsyJ 

.agj a» w»^M 

a ehlM on a whia» Mt feava wA® It ol®&r that w® »®l©iin« m 





r3oa*vx0J.eRO® xm ©eotoot wora -aiax. aas ea oreaw® ©oa,© 

ms xor TO© p«o« 

pla of I'%’y&©;fe Plw*s it TOSt "b® undixstocd that®»oa‘“Viol©Kj»@* m 


taotdh is Ania Arbor* It ms ohosaa for its ©ffectivoaea® at th® s 

RS«aai in, ll^i 

of mr g‘S<s2.»B owr na»b'«‘» and otor r®aoissrc©-s», Tm taotle wa® also 
at i'M.a tlKOs it «mm th@ atnaggl® forwax'd (to ®i«id atill is t© 


a RCY® to political &tro#jy) ifilii th© leiiet straia on th® soolal i 

fateio wMl®» at 

th« sasi® tiia®i, oroaitiXf tho Eaxiatis effoot on ihn fflctoial ordwr* ' 3 

[t should also 

b© palnicd. oat 'that iioa»*viol®E«© ©ncow|m®ses a Yory trid® fi«M of 

poasihlo 60 t« 

iona*. By c.o«on dsfialtloa* ©Yory aotioa that iha Bsxrigans aM. i 

^oir foHoweera 

i«Jok and ai'® takS.% «o non«vlol©nt in nai«r®8 Thi« brings m to 

0 «a? final point 

which i©i- om ®sn»©t h®* violent ®to a taaki, a. Isrioks m any otea? i 

noa-llYing thing 

In shirts Roa“vi©l«at civil ^diaotesdloMce* was pioktd not for its 


hwt far iia ctfrrant tjolltioal ®£f eotivonaaffi . 




















■\^ 

‘ >£ 


HEJECTtON OF REFORM/ELECTORiAL POUTfCS 

*• i 


'' ill 








EB^tSgWWiM 








^NTIAL 


oa-te 'th® ntatloml mma mpda an<!t In ii»gsr nraljare 
theory alwnt Ir-laM© within the aether cm 


ills 


forward to }n eowntod# Mar:^ oonfuoiors hav® ©sTOrrod in 
that haa g©n® on dmlng tal** dark a®®» Om of ttjis sost ' 
that ©leotoi'al. politS.ea «d r«fara th© osclstiBg 

nlngf^iil diffaronoQe 


pelliioal 
®<»@ i® -t 
r«s «4n sa 


This error la oomon but is oloarly illwstmted Ir/ a dooaiaont first ee 
ih,o eonforone® of PCPJ ©axlisr tlii® awsirr* It 1® ©atitled 


Asarican oorporatOf iraipsrlaXiniio ©apltalist® hav® hlMon hokliid ih® laaak ef “li- 
beral poHtioa® olnoo ih® storm ®f th® thlxtlas® iHs^y proudly wava th® Beclara* 


g®la» It is a confllot &t t®rw to think of reiu ohaag® 


and in, Unas Ih@ ©nSy tfeing® that ms® obtalnod thronis^ ih® 'proper ahm 


ti 
h' 

©: 

taotlcjsl ap^oaofess to th® gonoral thesis-with th® ©scooptlon of a ®e® 11 mwah®!* 
of iai«igwlded,p®0pl® wlio tried to eh®raot®ris© thos® who did not m *ag®ai 

provwatowr' ' ' ■ “ ’ ", - - . 

Th® divioivon®®® that approach teostte does not ©erv® the iaterosts th® 
p®opl®o It r&ther eisr^oo th® ohjoetiv® intoreats ©f tho JttH % driving apart 

V 




gonoral thesis-with th® ©scoeptlon of a ®e® 11 mwah®!* 
,ed to eh®raot®ris© thoa® who did not agre® m *a@®at ; 








W V COipiQENTIAL 

N»]Ail«aX a. U« tr^-* 

>®ia p'isliticial 5a T‘:\% ^f- 

fe-sant c<aRCi*®l«a mi. f1 f I'ffilj- ihu few e! 5;.r.'aj^- 

■ »tir»»lvts -et^fficea «w5y ia prA Seta 

isotsirisin hafer«a’i^i firisO.y Ik^Hcw im§ «i«rfe€®» iWaS4 i^caly 

lixnif/Sl© asR-a-pg tIaowaSlYas t« @el«t-iesia io obw ®fsm«R fsre'bJ^.ms as€ rais® 

4ia IlovcKc-Rt frem lt» ouzTaai dea3Lin«t Tawt l>M» «*aa aawrr oaauv if wo. era jfSKi- 
»ar©-3. to xfijewt ■feat ia fm&x &£ tfe® M^ol^gleal &is«® «£■ latstlliiag. ®w 

»ppctt.©nfe ticaitorsi egpn-io w we®««* 


!he par®J®s0tl®n a tinl'toA frewt'lai lBsf«iaat ewA Aoeo a®t 4oiqr tho «^»t«nao of 







•«9 


not to "bo hold It is our fooliisg^^t if rnmn did 

aot pifSjr th® ocpsjplfpsor^xy rol® to tb® wnl® ohaOTlnls'^lsis woisM- m> lm§mt feav® . 
fM<,ocn to roI*jt 9 nnd wonJ/I 1» prw©nt*d fr©a doin^ «®e fhls woi^lA «r«s^ 

mutmlljr ffiuytporfeatlv® m the festh^eiffi-teM! 

mid broth©!!:®* 

QOliTODENTIAL 


They inmt b« »®«m so ©. frry»Cir «xfco.j^iti©a of ih« ’people a»o tfeinj«* ©sdoat®.^ 
tloa of fh© el 4?:©’0 nooloiy islile-h thoy »«rY», 1» the- “teosidjost son®.®, it %m in th® 
oh^cotivi) n#If«-iat©r®!3t of tSss swki®.? oLs,«a to aM “ 

ue#lfva£s RownJJy doi®rrdw»d rol«8» 

The. (ii-:Mtl©n of g^y opps.‘OOffloa io a,3;mo bowl np In ih® Puritan ©this* ' Xa this 
vlow, it 3-0 hold that raoxual pr^foronao io not & sitaatica ©f dhelesj bat ©n® 
that ,if3 doslded by ffifroo® Tjeycad .th® cioatxol ef th® individmlo It 1® eiWiom 
that, thi® typo ct teUffihit eorvo® only tl:i?.'s3e who «®ek to'stiflo ih® ©spr«s®@io® 


cf l&fci boiKosn th« p®opl« « the ruling olaos* 


tlox:.:!?! oBi®'®®*i«'a a.T!,d th® iat«3T«i!to that it is dssigaod to s«ry® Ru*t 
Tjj© distcrrlraatlon ©f tho osact nodo of stgfuggl®' ia, as always^ to h® 
by tho cenaiituonoy InTolvod* ■ 


Concrete effo^sta Etist bo «r«3®ctsIr,oa in tha «x®a of ©eoc eduodtlea® K® Kust effas? 
iho knotrlodgo w« haro of rol®-^l®y3.ng» »«Jl« supKemoy* ®naita?al a^.ua-miurftl® 
©ox dritSQS and iomSoBSd©®# oon-teaooptiro devioos eM. t^os® ®M 

aU tho amiXable 3Laf «£mii<m oh hov our hedios uorke 

H® ®tt®t offer ■ eur e;Balya®3 ef fe«m tha patriarohal seoisty evolve md. how it Is 
m®d 1^*- the rvtlihg elsths to hoM m &.mn» An analysia ef hono^iay saist Ism pro-». 
s®nt®d$tri'yi a »u«sxx of ohr osforionoos in eolAoetiyes ©hd liyiss^* 

Beology 

It raust "t® sr€®lined at the ©utsoi timt ih© tshols rmson tlmt ;^ilhti©n ferns set , 
“brnn 6t®pf!sd of ib® l&wa hair® beea ©a the b®©& for alrsost fifty 

y®5us'S*^ie®» Iayl|$aM© %t««! A®t ef 1869)i® that it S,© net as |r©flt«afel® to -ys® 
larg© eorpomt® oafitfllffits to operate in cueh & mms.@r ns to sieis^s© or 
iWfc® polltitioa (tfe®raal,partienlat« ox' e^onloal)*' Existing lam ®®v@r tfe® vast 
majority ef «ooXo§i®®l profel®®B, hut ir© not onfex^ed dssptt® @11 tli© ®3ifef£®l® 
®u|s|!ort px©a®ntly by offlo® eM powox^huB^y pelitloiiw» Tis® fesafe- 

ri3i>iey ©f th® systea* 1« n®v®r ®sra «wld®ni than her®* ^©’Justle® ,B@p“ 

axtisont’ wouM attaok the oneaios «f its eeri^rat® feosso© purr 

&m r«©l criMnale* • . 

Thi® etrufglsj lik® sll oihsrsj nusit "fe© feu^t tis® p@©pl® wh© r®«4llho It is 
la tholr objeotlv® to have clean air and mt©r feathar tfem to Ms© th® 

poskots of iij,o rollng oiaes* If net stopped ea this front* th@ es 5 .piisd 5 .sts 
eaald woll Idll 'm all <sff» inclisAing iii©a«®lv@e* Birest ara elo®rly 

noaoss.ary, end e©».®' esso balsg carrlsd ©at by evee fellow, in straggl® la linnoi®, 
fh® Fox* Hia mtn of oowrag©' la tho fas® «f oerpamto dwtfe-^d^lors ®r© not . 
well reported, in ih© p4g press* bat ean fc» roed about if lo«k^ for e®f®?uliye ' 
Thin atraggltt sfeonM bo ©aoalnted* 

Sou^east Asian Struggle for IndopenSsnoo 
The ihperi«!^iatlo am ®f Aaficrloan &apiialiaa lays heavy aoross th® shouM@m of 



® ' CONT^ZjWTIAL ■■ 

«ttc 1?roth«>;r« ftirsd slstwa 5.ii SS Aisla* %© V3 to 

“stop '"the ®tww^«r.ffl» c£ h^G%9 f«x «filf«4.ot©Trdn'3,tion* "Slmf ^oailatto 

to flgiit 023* ®««t offsjr tineas r 1&, itt rhat'er^r fora tbef «oo to ntop 

th« aXsit^tor of their foofle* Diroot motion ca« 1«» tahon th® is»ai> 3 »«t«" 

tatlon of mx matori®!, <llr««t ’fitotlon oan fen Uikm wvtSxtvt tho proiSsnotlea o? 
‘Bueh E5at®rlol* «»d dlreot ADtlcn cm h» talion t»v<5Tennisjo elrlllo.sr mri military 
p®rf?sKiBol around the Doopla'a fenne Trf;,%ty, Bala logics osa ha applied, ta lib* 
©ration stmu^rgleai. fen»^t on all. froaii« jajmiiitst th® US ©ppror.j?.“:?r* 

l*ho fsatwro of U1 impi8rlffli.llB«s hm hoon raoiot In ^at'isro slis^o it rsi-a sit’s-s-^lop^'l 
txon tho *whlt« Kaa’a Ttardon* dootrlno of tepoxial EngXc>,iid.e 5ha tIow that all 
ether poopl© bx» ©osslsosr Isiferior atill. applie.® m ro aid etei? ®und®oiOTol®p®d® 
fHonda to th* aouttn ami help owr ®fo©k® mill®* in SS sftsla* __ _ 

Xntoraal Oppreaolon 

Th® ©pprossir® ©y®iofa oeaiiinsoa to aor© strongly on, tti® hea# froat t;>sjs Its 
do|»®,rtra®nt «f H®¥ feae. hsoa ©hjsxffiot®rif?©d ®s th@ dopartmnt of dlaoaass Ki®ia«“ 
fernation and sterwlloa* Aptly eno»?fh9 it 1 © -jnst that* Health Is only n©e® 
to ttie eapltallets i® k©op fela laher retulroasat fillsd tflth ^?smtla® 
Isodiion s Hi® oy®to® so soro ©0x0® atent real haal'^ ear© than a gxm dsoo aWat 
who £lr®is it* B©fi?dr the r©nsahl® md disoard th@ rera ©nVJuffit Hk® on isfe® * 
rost ®f the s?.ac?hij:->©rye Mnoatlea.l® eaoth@r Bi®a@s©x« Masatlons. t® th@ (mp«" 
italiat# la th© -psomm of ttsralag otti th® skills aeeosaasy t® Isorssffied p?a™ 
fita*. 

The p®,©t and p;t«ffl©ai tr®ad of th© aov®®©at hm b@®a to pl&©@ a mjor ©sximals 
©It cell.®ge 0ffi5spus ©rl©nt«d orgoMmatioa® H© r©c©gniffi® that th® mlv©ralty Is 
ayst®a®s aotfeod of s«|if lying th® nith th® ©dsdniffi* 

tr&tiv© laekoy® It needs to exist. It is Inpertant to eontlan® ih® atrsggl® 
on thl.® loxel* 


f(g©lj fewovor, that ih© r©al tackbon© efth® pocpl® hM h®©a e©®pl©tely ig- 
ssoxeds, or loft to th© r®vlsl©n®ry SKC* ^at is te ©^y-j wo har© i/p©red ih® _ i 
pe^’pl.sa ©f hl^ oad pr®-high eehool ag©« This lacks hietorloai porapoe- i 

tlv© ©M fflaaok® cf ®^© dmmlnimt ^0 era igaoriag th© psoletarlats ear sis« , | 
t©x‘» ©sA teoth®rs whe ®r® destined by th@lr 'olaa© -ta h« fe® <8&RE©a f©dd®r f©e ' • " 
Isperianea# Th® f©opl© rhos® Baa^Jal or tooteieal la'ser i@ so totally oxplel- ! 
ted tiiatj eowpled with th© aoatal ooadltioniag w® r®©®ix®, hav® no d)ano® to 
llv® a neanin^^ Hf®* , * 

Th© poopl© 1® tMs &g@,gronp me at a tia© In thoir lives when they ax© f eras- 1 

lailng coBOrot® and ^©raspiiom on rfeat direction ihssy will W® . ? 

f©«l It ia of tfe@ ntso®t li^@rian.e® t© eoahat th® Irainwahiag that the ftystca 
Is Isringlttg down oa onr yoiagor sistsr© iM ‘S»©t&,©ra* 

\B I® suf facing de-feat m tli© jidlitery frost in Aal® s?jd aew' relies 
m ita ability to mg® ®OflKOI«C^IGAL warfM*©# Tl»® 'baokhofflo ef a toc^hnologloal 
society l« th® working ol&sa# tins vH&m th@®o people @ra mut &cO'as;slhl® 
in in the high schools* and at cultv^rsl ovonts* such a® rook festivals* 

Hies© are th® p®4jple»mho will taking oar pl®®@ la th® Kovesaat* Bs®s® ar® , 
iho pNoopl® who will Bale* np tho baokbon® «f Ar®y* : / 

40 COI^feENTIAL 

' ■' “ *• ' .‘ '■ 


confiMntial 

r.'iHS. at p 9 pfl« ef hS.^i sschvSrjs4*®9 ©tty letsf/tfes' m; 

■bo graa'ISljr hliwS^rrl^ esl w® will n©i ©©® tfe® t®tal ©f tIJI ls;f??rls'JJ.@Me W« 

f.Tirt nl.®® ®nooi?rag® otrr 3 ron^».g«?r ©Inter® aM teetlSsr® t® BMS^-a as streng^lj las ^s-, 
oibl© on th® host froni# Fi-s swat point ®tst th© fjnsltlea© sifforts' at ih® imt &s» 


MfSJJIO 3!.Tt OA®@,I 

‘ irfMt,Ti ■ w®y wp ran carrang^ -um u^ssa.® «s mm &m is® 

i ‘ wii>® it ©nt« 

via a rwoXaftloaa 







i|||B|W 




IIHHHIIIHMH 

||HH|P^HMHHBP|H||HMHipHM^HBHI|HipBB9^BHH^RPIIl^BIIH 




Tho0® &S tm who revolt ©^iisat this irMtsam wh® M® aii’s’sptlag t® or®- 

ato a yaoplo*® owlttsr® esi a feiiaan «r© ta:®at@d a® «a invedlBg msw (®^swy" 















^y " . BlTOla ta® ®« 

svoioat 1® ta© ean®®r &s »g© emaviiassad it i® a rcslestioa ®f ©ur 

training la i 


C' teT'c^r. of th© 

OM Lcfto ,^t al®@ frw©at® «® froa b«il&lii@ hri^ss b®tw©@a tho: 

Ft ‘ various steg* 

m &S ta@ srouta oultur®» It® iitfluoao© mtd t@ te @%pr®s @®4 in -^o - > 

/ statcnoat il%" 

^Xf o@ri@us)9*’d®n®i -test m^am ©vor ,tM2%”e ’ Altoou^ this is 

1 

1 

1 

1 


t,<i;:Bn^BHBBHHllfllH^^I 

^®iiO0 gffid s.'cportlso iij§t©®d'of teaMlag to bt ta^t lehai tr® do 


?M ©Irnggl© in this eouatey is pturt of ta@ iateastioimi elass 


It is th® fsmeiiea ®f xmlm i® k©®p th® 




% iH|HH|HH^B|^^n^^B^P^|BBHi|piC 


















'‘BCTyBliBlliMM W' 

U >r|B[^B^HB|B|^Bifl||||i[a^ 




1 •«' 





1 , ' • 

«& £X® your inromsrs &m. si@t®r@ in otrugglot 



/ .-..-•v ■ 144-. , CONFl^NTIAL r '" ; 












CONFm^ITIAL 


The final session of the NCAG was held on 
August 17, 1971, The meeting was eirected oy riniey 
Campbell of the Indiana Peace and Freedom Party* 

During the meeting the following proposal for fall action 
program was introduced by Mike Drobenaire* He did not claim 
responsibility for preparing the proposal but called it 
"the off the wall proposal." 

PROPOSED FALL ACTION PROGRAM 

This proposal is being given to bring 
about unity between those who favor regional 
local' actions and those who want a national 
action. 

THE CALENDAR 


September 29 — Support demonstration for 
Angela Davis 


October 13 - 14 — Nationwide moratorium in 
every town and city across the country there 
should be actions. The actions should be 
everything from peaceful marches to student 
strikes and work stopages to nonviolent 
direct action. The People *s Coalition and 
SMC will be pushing these dates. It is 
important that we make sure these demonstrations 
are unlike former moratorium days but have the-- - 
militant multi- is sue approaches of Mayday, 

It is important that this moratorium day is 
a dynamic demonstration, that people all over 
the country are exposed to an anti-imperialistic, 
anti-racist, anti-sexist movement. These local 
demonstrations must be seen as equal to national 
mobilization in building. J:he_.m.o^ementiL. 


43 


1 

( 


confT^ntial 



V 


I 





Octob©'/» 9.S «.« SMT5T»i^r--;* V1.»Ali ae^:i««n -Ja 
W ashington, D,C« 


; 

i 

I 


, t 


Wall Stx'eet action. 

October 30 ~ 31 — People begin to gather at 
movement centers and universities throughout 
the city. These days are used for gathering 
affinity groups and scouting out the financial 
districts. There will be regional representatives 
meetings that weekend. There will be no master 
plan so that regions and affinity groups will be 
free to rake all tactical decisions. The only 
guideline will be that the actions should be 
nonviolent. Housing will be all over the city 
and thus preventing ^ trapped in one spot, 

November 1 It will be first day people move out 
in a massive way. People leave the centers about 
rush-hour and mingle with regular people going to 
work. This time is used to 6:tplain our actions, 
get signatures for the peace treaty, and (illegMe) 
to get as much support as possible from the people 
who work in the financial districts. We must make 
it clear we are not against the people who work in 
the financial district but those people who control 
the financial district, i,e, Rockerfeller, Morgan, 
Hunt, and Dupont, We must plan our actions to center 
around the New York Stock Market and American ‘ Market , 
W’e should concentrate around brokerage houses 
as Merrill, Lynch, Winston, Bach, and Company, 

Morgan, Our targets should be hit at full strength 
around the lunch hour so that any clearing attempt 
will be iripossifolG to deal w.lth_us„alone^ _ . 





}. 






stock Market is closed. We regather our forces 
and move on the domestic issue of repression and 
poverty. Mayday talks of being a multi-issue 
movement. This sceniro truly allows it. Our 
emphasis for this day is the Foley Square area. 

The institutions in this area are Tombs, City 
Hall, State Office Building, Federal Office 
Building, VJelfare Office, and the Courts in 
Panther 21 was tried and where Federal Grand Jury 
in session. Emphasis should be on the cutback in 
welfare, the unjust treatment of prisoners in the 
tombs and Grand Jury and Political Prisoner issue. 

On that day too, we be at full strength at lunch 
to mingle with the government workers . We vjill 
deal with community problems (illegible) unemployment, 
lack of social services, and drugs (smack). At 
5 o’clock we gather at Madison and 42nd Street. 

We will be there to implement our anti-sexist 
stand, VJe will be at Madison Avenue to point out 
how our lives manipulated into believing that 
women are proper, gay is bad, and the genocide in 
Vietnam is good. We move from Madison Avenue 
is its extension Times Square, The place where 
the American culture .exposes itself. We show exactly 
how we feel about sex-ploy movies and jpmographic 
bookstores. We move later that night to the gay 
bars that only exploit its patrons instead of caring 
for them, * 

November 3 — We move back to Wall Street, One difference 
between us and the Trots is our willingness to engage 
in sustained actions, Wednesday will prove our 
commitment to sustained actions. We are asking for 
Student Strikes throughout the city and their presence 
at Wall Street for support. Hopefully, by this. day the 
Market will bi in a two-day log jam. All our forces 
should be in town rested and ready to go. Our major 
effort will be in keeping pressure on brokerage houses 
and stock exchanges. Efforts should ..be. made, to.iamb . 




phonics’ j phoney irm'dua,, nnc' block 

enfeynciis to tn^j Ti^^irp.ets, i’top.'.>.' r-ita e^pcctco, 
to try riost iniayj native plan, Strai.jrht 

civil disobedience will not ^.ork but all kinds 
of different direct action will, 

November 1’ — On this day we stcirt a new form. 

Many people will be leaving for local areas. 

The trouble with -".ost liitional demonstrations 
is that Most people leave without any idea of 
what is nsKt, The ne>:t two days should be used 
for establishing communications dealing ::ith 
movcaTJcnt problesRj a.nd planning how we deal with 
the mas" marches on Saturday, The day should be 
used for a more coneese and and organized 
demonstration against" S'HACK , silACK is a movement 
problem and should be dealt with. We should move 
to St, Mark’s and '?nd Avenue, East Village, There 
have deiiionstration against the pusher man. It is 
eibout time we blow the whistle on the chief pushers 
ICy Inieu ::nd Hi^ion, 

November 5 -«• Meetings should continue. This day should 
concern i.tsolf with survival, NYC has the x^orst 
social services in -the country* If x^e arc movement 
concerned about all people xv*e must show our solidarity 
v:lth people xifho must live in NYC, There should be 
rallies at welfare centers, board of education, 

Social Security Office, and belview Hospital, These 
rallies should be (illegible) X'jith local groups as 
NWRO, Operation Bread Basket, Young Lords, and the 
Panthers* It in important on the eve of the Trot 
march we concern ourselves xjith the domestic issues, 

November 6 -» Tnis is the day of massive peace march. 

It ic our- duty to have some I'.ind of psences . .Most 
people t'd'vo cc-iie to y'Varr.s marches are looking for a 
real politic:*, i dyno.ffJ.c, VJe can supply the politics 
that arc so missing frea these events. We can use 
thir t.l ‘.5 to gather ^ i'.n&turQs for peace trecly and 
enlibt net; people in the 







Hovember 2 — Election Dav. Stock Market closed « 

12 p.m. gather in Foley Square. Protest against 
present system and Grand Jury and welfare cutbacks. 

November 2 5 p.m, — gather at Bryant Park, 

Move against Madison Avenue — Times Square, 

9 p.m, protest against rip-off gay bars, 

November 3 — People move back to Wall Street, 

Call for high school strike in support of V7all 
Street action by their presence, 

November 4 — Reorganization and tactical planning, 
Anti-SMACK Day — small afS.nity group action on the 
lower east side, 

November 5 — Survival Day •— Affinity group action at 
Social Services (or lack of them), i.e. Welfare, 

Social Security, Belview, and Board of Education, 

November 6 — Make visibility of Mayday people at 
the NPAC rally through banners, guerilla theater, 
leaflets, and human contact with demonstrations, 

November 8 — Tentative., Move back to Wall Street, 

With the acceptance of the above-proposed actions 
it was decided at the NCAG that the details should be further 
refined by an interim committee which would gather at the 
National MDC Headquarters, VJashington, D,C, After working 
the proposals out in detail, the interim committee will travel 
to New York City in order to handle logistic and tactical 
problems . 


Those appointed to the iterim committee are 
Finley Campbell, Mike Drobenaire, Michael Weber, Lucy Vargas, 
Carol Kitchens, Melinda R., Dick LeClaire, Mike Wallick, 

Daria Price, and Wayne Scott, The interim committee is 
compossd of gay men and women as well as straght me n and woman. 

I 

I 
( 


48 


CONyiDENTIAL 


CONFEbEKTIAL 


Thp MTJP Matinnnl Artinn to be fstapod in New 
York City by design has been scheduled to coincide with 
PCPJ and National Peace Action Coalition (NPAC) activities 
there but is to maintain its identity as an MDC action. 

During the NCAGj Mike Drobenaire made the 
following statements concerning the impending political 
conventions to be held in San Diego* California, and • 

Miami, Florida: 

The people are already gathering and | ■ 

moving into San Diego and Miami for the up I 

coming conventions. The San Diego Convention / 

will be primarily the responsibility of people I / 
on the VJest Coast, It is not thought that they / / 
will be successful in shutting down the San Diego/ 
Convention, The Miami Convention will be handled/, / 
however, and everyone should go to Miami, Large / 
masses of people will be there for the convention, 
"Chicago vjill look small compared to what Miami 
will he in the coming convention," MDC will be 
involved to some extent in Mj.ami but virtually j 
every major activist in this country will 
participate including Yippies and Weathermen, I 
The people who are now in Miami have acquired a I 
house and are tackeling the problems of housing,! 
medical supplies, food, maps of the city, etc, \ 

During the NCA6 the individual organizations 
represented hel d workshops, di scussion groups, and parties. 

On one occasion | I gave infitryug-hinns on how to 

build a false identity. 


i nstructed that thosd pebpid Wh6 drc ftdW coming up 

in the organization, which he did not further identify, 
should build themselves a new identity. He displayed a 
passport on which was printed his photogra.ph un der another name. 


INTIAL 


• .-rV 



Additionallv. he dianlJivad a Bi'rth r.^rt-r finatA. 
a drivers license, a blood donors card, and a Social 
Securii:y Card, all wxth a name w hich he cl aimed he would 

According to I I the first stop 

in building a new identity is to visit a Slate Archives 
and to research newspapers printed at the time which 
you are attempting to establish as your birthdate. You 
are to look for articles announcing the birth of an 
individual and from these articles, obtain biographical 
data such as the full name, date of birth, names of the 
parents and the grandparents, if available. This information 
IS copied and memorized after which a request is made for a 
duplicate birth certificate at that State’s Bureau of 
Vital Statistics. The information obtained from the newspaper 
can be transcribed onto the appropriate forms at the Bureau of 
Vital Statistics. After acquiring the birth certificate it 
IS a simple matter to obtain a Social Security card, a 
drivers license, and a passport as well as numerous 
supporting items of identification. 


[ indicated that after establishing ones 

hew identity it should be held in abeyance until needed* 

Following the final session of the NCAG on 
August 17, 1971, the majority of the participants departed 
Atlanta, Georgia, to return to„their.r(ispe£tiy,c ..areas*. 


* 


SO 


confMntial 




• t 



MAY DAY COLLECTIVE (MDC) 
NATIONAL CONFERENCE 


FEOrLE'3 COALITIGiv FOR FEACE AND 
JUSTICE (PCPJ) 



A PCPJ press release dated March 1, 1971, 
described the PCPJ as being headquartered in 
Washington, D.C., and consisting of over 100 
organizations which are using massive nonviolent 
civil disobedience to combat racism, poverty, 
repression, -"and war. 


NATIONAL PEACE ACTION COALITION 
(NPAC) 


The NPAC was founded in 1970 by members of 
the Socialist Workers Party,, (SWP Its basic 
objective is to unite massdS«*<3'f'/»j3,^gpl^^^ including 
labor unions, GI's, and the’’^iadik -oommunity ■ 
in the struggle to end United States inter- 
vention in Southeast Asia through orderly and 
peaceful tactics. The SWP has been designated 
pursuant to Executive Order 10450. 

STUDENTS FOR A DEMOCRATIC SOCIETY (SDS) 

SDS was founded during June, 1962, at Port 
Huron, Michigan, and in the 1960 's functioned 
as the leading New Left campus-based student 
organization in the United States, From a stance 
of "participatory democracy," the SDS moved to 
a radical-revolutionary ■ position , It maintained 
a national office at 1608 West Madison Street, 
Chicago, Illinois, until February, 1970, 

Internal factionalism during 1969 produced 
three main factions: Weatherman, Revolutionary 

Youth Movement (RYM) , and Worker Student 
Alliance (WSA) . The Weatherman and RYM no longer 
consider themselves associated with the SDS. 

The WSA faction continues to use the name SDS. 





MAY DAY COLLECTIVE 
NATIONAL CONVENTION 



. bJTUUJiNT MOtilLX/jAi J-Ow COMHxTXijjj TO END THE 
WAR IN VIETNAM (SMC) 


The SMC is controlled by the Socialist Workers 
Party (SWP) and its youth affiliate, Young 
Socialist Alliance (YSA) . SMC initiates and 
supports public demonstrations against the 
war in Southeast Asia. 


INTIAL 


52 * 


CONTOENTIAL 


FD-36 (Rev. 5-22-64) 


Diw. S/a/71 


Transmit the following in 


(Type ir v!szrttexi ; -'5 


Via AlKTliL 


(priority) 


DIRECTOR, FBI 


FROM: SAC, SAN ANTONIO (100-12632) (P) 


MAY DAY COLLECTIVE (MDC) 
NATIONAL CONFERENCE AT 
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 
(NCAG) 8/13-17/71 
IS - NEW LEFT / / 


ReSAtel to Bu, 7/20/71, captioned "MAY DAY COLLECTIVES 
PROPOSED SOUTHWESTERN REGIONAL CONFERENCE, FAYETTEVILLE, 

ARKANSAS, JULY 30-AUGUST 1, 1971; NATIONAL CONFERENCE, ATLANTA, 
GEORGIA, AUGUST 10-17, 1971, VIDEM;" Bureau airtel to Albany, 
7/26/71, captioned "MAY DAY COLLECTIVE (MDC), IS - HDC;" and 
Atlanta airtel and LHM to the Bureau, 8/18/71, captioned "MAY 
DAY COLLECTIVE (MDC), NATIONAL CONFERENCE, ATLANTA, GEORGIA, 
8/13-17/71, IS - NEW LEFT;" and San Antonio report of SA JAMES E. 
KING, 8/28/71, captioned "ARMADILLO MAY DAY TRIBE, IS - MDC." 

2 - Bureau (Enc. 10) (RM) 

2 - Albany (Enc. 2) (RM) 

(1-100-MDC) ^ , 

(1-1 00 -UPPER NEW YORK STATE MAY DAY COLLECTIVE) (Pag© 14) 

2 - Alexandria-- (Enc. 2) (RM) 

(1-100-MDC) 

(1-100- J 1 (Page 11) ^ 

8 - Atlanta (Enc. S) 1 3 - 

( 1 - 1 U C - -HLC .A^;l;-v'AL CO I v PENCE ) 

(I-IOD-I (PfiRis 1,9, 48) (73-3^ — 

(1-100- : -■ A ^ ' 

(1-100-= 1,9) 

(1-100- (LNU; (Pages 1,2,9) — ri' J 




3- S' JB 


w'AL (.0NF^?E,.jCE) 

(PegiS 1,9,48)(: 
^ .1 , 2 5 9 ) I 

: 1 , 9 ) 


(LNU; (Page: 


1.2,9) 


(cot>v count 


-Tin/vc> 


SEAr.CHED-.y/-^KXED.._^J 

SERlALIZED-^<El:i!L=---^^pU 

SEP 2 01971 L 

FBI— wilA.v’.l 


.M Per 


O ;-1 A 


Approved: 


Sent 



SA 100-12632 


(Atlanta cojfes continued) 


4 - 


4 - 


2 - 


5 - 


3 - 


5 - 


(l-lOOj 

(1-100 


Baltimore (Enc. 4) 
(1-100 -MDC) 

( 1-100 


(LNU) (j age 9) 


(RM) 


(Pages 1,12,48,49,50) 


(1-100 

(1-100 

Boston 


U'nc. 4) (RM) 
(1-100-MDC) 


(Page 6) 
(Page 7) 
(Page 8) 


( 1 - 100 ,. 

d-100' 

( 1 - 100 - 

Charlo 


1 (n^onetic) (LNU) (Page 9) 




tte (Eno. 
(1-100 -MDC) 


2 ) 


age 9 ) 

(Pag© 1,2,9) 
(RM) 


( 1 - 100-1 
Chicago (Enc. D (RMj 


( Page 7 ) 


(1-100-MDC) 


( 1 - 100 - 

( 1 - 100 - 

( 1 - 100 - 

( 1 - 100 - 


~| (Pa ge 6 ) 

|(Page 7) 


— j_| (Page 7) 
_J(Page 8 ) 

3) (RM) 


Cincinnati (Enc. 

(1-100-MDC) 

(1-lQO -YELLOW SPRINGS, OHIO, 
(1-100- 1 I (LNU) (Page 10) 

Cleveland (Enc. 3) (RM) 


MAY DAY) (Page 15,16) 


(X-IOD-MDC) 

(1-100-J 

( 1 - 100 - 


KLNU) (Pa ges 1.2.9) 

J (Pages 1,2,9) 


Dallas (Enc. 5) (RM) 

(1-100-MDC) 

(1-lOQ -PURPLE ?^ TAR TRIBE) (Page 3) 

(Phonet ic) (Page 3) 
\ (Page 6) 


( 1 - 100 - 

( 1 - 100 - 

(i-ioo-{ 

Detroit 


(.Enc . 
(1-100 -MDC) 


ST 


(^ge 6 ) 

tRM) 


( 1 - 100 - 

( 1 - 100 - 


(Page 'O 
(Page 7) 





SA 100-12632 



(Detroit copies continued) 


3 - 


2 - 


7 - 


O 


( 1 - 

( 1 - 


100 

100 


Houston CEnc. (RM) 
(1-100 -MDC) 

( 1 - 100 - 
( 1 - 100 - 
( 1 - 100 - 


f Pejge 9 ) 

(Page 


9) 


T 


( 1 - 100 - 
( 1 - 100 - 
Indianapolxs 
(1-100-MDC) 
(1-lQQ -INDIANA PEACE 


(Pages 3,12) 
(Page 10) 
(Page 10) 
(LNU) (Page 10) 

(LNU) (Page 11) 

(Enc. 3) (RM) 


(License 
7) (RM) 


]) 


(1-100-j 

Kansas City (Enc. 2) (RM) 
(1-100-MDC) 

(1-100-ELE R 128) 

Little Rock (Enc. 

(1-100 -MDC) 

( 1-100 
( 1-100 
(I-IO'O-I 
( 1-100 
( 1-100 
(l-lOOl 
Los Angeles 
(1-100-MDC) 

( 1 - 100-1 
( 1-100 
Miami 

(1-100-MDC) 

(j^lOO-1972 
New York 


AHP FREEDOM 
(Page 9) 


PARTY) (Page 9) 


plate) 


(LNU) 

(LNU) 

JTLNU) (Page 
(Enc. 3) (RM) 


(Page 
Page 8) 
(Page 8) 
rPage 8 ) 
(Page 8) 

8) 


8 ) 


(Enc. 2) (RM) 


(Page 

(Page 


6 ) 

6 ) 


DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION) 
25- New York (Enc. 25) (RM) 
(2-100-MDC) 

(1-lOO j I (L NU) (Page 26) 

(1-100 (LNU) (Page 26) 

(1-100 BOLDT) (Pages 10,42) 

(1-100 (LNU) (Pages 10,26) 

(1-100 (LNU) (Page 26) 

(1-lOOj LlNU) (Page 26) 

(1-100 (LNU) (Page 26) 


■b6 

b7C 


be 

b7C 


3 



(New York copies continued) 


2 - 
2 - 
2 - 
2 - 
1+ - 

L2 - 


(1-100-L 


V -L— JLU UH 

(1-lOOf 

(l-iool 

Cl-lOO-l 


I 


C r ca^s 
) ■ 


(Pags 1,12,13,43,48,49) 


^ \ 
“T ^ / 


(1-1004 
(1-100 
(1-1004 
(i-ioo4 
(1-100 
(1-100 
(l-100-[ 
(1-100 
(1-100^ 

(1-1004 

( 1 -ioo j 

(i-ioo | 

Omaha (Enc . 


n.MTi) 

\l 


(Page 12) 
y (Page 42) 
IXEage 42) 

I ) (Page 42) 
(Page 26) 




1 (LNU) 


e 42) 

J (Page 42) 
(Page 42) 
(Page 26) 
(Pages 10,26) 
(Page 42) 


(Pag^ 3, 0 .42) 

) (Page 


](Page 10) 


10 ) 


]■ (Pages 10,42 

2) (RM) 

(1-100-MDC) 

(1-100-8A4140 (License plate) 
Philadelphia (Enc. 2) (RM) 

(1-100 -MDC) 

( 1 - 100 - 


48) 


Pittsburgh CEnc. 27 

(1-100 -MDC) 

(1-lQO l ' ~ 

San Diego (Enc. 2) (RM) 
(1-lOO-MDC) 


(Page 
tRM) 


8 ) 


1> (Pages 1,11) 


(1-100-1972 
Tampa (Enc. 
(1-100-MDC) 
(1-100- 
(1-100- 


REPUBLICAN 
4) (RM) 


CONVENTION) (Page 49) 


(1-100-L 
WFO (Enc 
(1-100- -MDC) 
(1-100-T 

J.OC-1 

(i-ioc4 
(1-100 
(1-100 
(1-100 


T 


I ) (Page 
(Page 6) 


6 ) 


1-2) (RM) 


](Page 6) 


liLffliL4Page 11) 
(Page 7) 
(Pa ge 11) 

(Pages 7,11) 
Page 1 a ) 
(Page 11) 





SA 100-12632 


(WFO copies con1:inued) 

(I-IOO-I ICPage 7) be 

(1-100-j (P age 11) — b7c 

<l-100- r I (Page 8) 

(1-lOO-PEOPLE'S COALITION FOR PEACE AND JUSTICE) 

(Pages 17, 18, 19, and 20) 

(1-100-VIETNAM VETERANS AGAINST THE WAR) (Page 44) 

1 - Albuquerque (Enc. 1) (RM) 

1 - Birmingham (Enc. 1) (RM) 

1 - Buffalo (Enc. 1) (RM) 

1 - Butte (Enc. 1) (RM) 

1 - Columbia (Enc. 1) (RM) 

1 - Denver (Enc. 1) (RM) 

1 - El Paso (Enc. 1) (RM) 

1 - Jackson (Enc. 1) (RM) 

1 - Jacksonville (Enc. 1) (RM) 

1 - Knoxville (Enc. 1) (RM) 

1 - Las Vegas (Enc. 1) (RM) 

1 - Louisville (Enc. 1) (RM) 

1 - Memphis (Enc. 1) (RM) 

1 - Milwaukee (Enc. 1) (RM) 

1 - Minneapolis (Enc. 1) (RM) 

1 - Mobile CEncl' 1) (RM) 

1 - Newark (Enc. 1) (RM) 

1 - New Haven (Enc. 1) (RM) 

1 - NexA? Orleans (Enc. 1) (RM) 

1 - Nortolk (Enc. 1) (RM) 

1 - Oklahoma City (Enc. 1) (RM) 

1 - Phoenix (Enc. 1) (RM) 

1 - Portland (Enc. 1) (RM) 

1 - Richmond (Enc. 1) (RM) 

1 - Sacramento (Enc. 1) (RM) 

1 - St. Louis (Enc. 1) (RM) 

1 - Salt Lake City (Enc. 1) (RM) 

1 - San Francisco (Enc. 1) (RM) 


SA 100-12632 




1 - Savannah (Eno. 1) (RM) 

1 £ca1:i:lo i ■> Crm') 

1 - Springfield (Enc. 1) (RM) 

6 - San Antonio 
(H-100-12632) 

C 2-100-12654) (ARMADILLO MAI DAY TRIBE) 

JEK : al 
(159) 


Enclosed for the Bureau are ten copies of an LHM 
dated and captioned as above. Dissemination is also being 
made to all continental offices in the form of at least one 
information copy. Extensive dissemination is deemed necessary 
as the details of the LHM indicate that efforts will be 
made to implement May Day activities throughout the United 
States during November, 1971. 

No local dissemination is being made. San Antonio 
will mainxain extra copies of the LHM in the event additional 
dissemination is required. 


The source mentioned in the LHM is and 

the primal l ocation of the information herein contained is 


The LHM is classified cs»»f5?^ntial inasmuch as it 
contains information furnished Sy the above source , the 
unauthorised disclosure of which could reasonably result 
in his identification and thereby adversely affect national 
defense interests. 


b7D 

b7E 


be 

b7 

b7 



SA 100-126 


Those indlM'iJ’ii;!!:. raentioried in the LH'-I from Austin^ 
Texas jj and the AMDt navn uticjii ’^eccardin^ status 

and available background in referenced report ^ 8/2b/?'la 

Considering the disruptive activities of the MDC 
in Washington^ DoCo(, during Mays> 1971s potential exists 
for continued and increased acts of civil disobedience or 
violence g, possibly resulting in violations of antiriot 
Isi^s and other Federal statutes a Therefore g all receiving 
offices are requested to carefully revievjr the enclosed 
LHM and conduct v.'arranted investigation, WFO should be 
particularly alert for any information concerning the Interim 
Committee of the MDC and planed disruptive activities to be 
staged in York City during Movemberg 1971a 







AlfTKEL 


EEGiST££lD Mill.- 


S'BQM: 


umcm 


DXBSCTC^, FBI <157-2760) 
SAC, MIAMI a€?5-106gS> (P> 


Th«re are set forth herein Miaai ’b observe tioi?s 
cofioc-rtilng eo¥era';e of iiEPCOH ’shicb Ei.'s:f bo of interegt to 
th:& Bureau a«d aaaistaace to Chicago in covorin^ DSfeCOH*. 

A copy of a Chart of th® Miasti Boach Convention Coaplox' is 
oysci.O'5o<.L, It 1.3 aotofi tho whoi’S oi tiio Coi!.v©otio;0: Cotnol-Ois 
was ■ ««€ios«ei by a iiafe foacot two desiorsatT-stion 

outbid® in front. This proved to bo of Incsttoble' 

to th© polios S,J5 CO.S5tJ.*Ol. of £?“SiOir;g tr 3 1 i CSi.S 

3F»Bl-PLAKJfll?G OPCHATIO^J 

n. r~ i rjuwiT orir~*--ii»inim 

Cowsaenctog with a period of a month prior to th®- 

‘Sfi. idif-I lit j’ljj of tJto MstpubAic^n Cofj.TipQti.o-,ft > i5 

of hrieflogs wore held id Beaeix,. attended foy th® 

wimt» law enforcciEeat agencies , reclera I and local. 

At' these briefings the probiesa, both real and possible, 
were thoroughly aaslysied, ami every probability coasidered. 
Each agency head, Bud/ox- perao& entrusted with.” tbo 
xsspcatsibility si tbs .respective asoacy,, was cosipleteiy 
oriaated as to the* problesas which !S5,iglit be fjccous tered. 

It is absolutely rsaentSal that Bnrsau reor«3eij,t;at 
&ttmM them brief lajja , aot only to be coses aequainted with t 
reprcse»tmtive» and their problems , but to add to th® over-a 
istailigeace of thoss pro€«®.diugs . 

3 - Bureau (Kae-iHRH) (AMSD) -^-^O ' /3^^_ / 

t„-Chlcat(0 (Ene^iXiaiXDFMCON) (AM3) ^ Q? 

2.1"' J-;Ai5,SsX ..i_.'— i/' 

i ' 

w. ,* /VI I n. . z,^ ', 

„ 0 ! : 

1 7 •' '''/AX/ [ / . I I V ‘X 


:hSo-/^ss- (/ 

-■VS,:;. ' - rX ^ 



- fw-fi' -■'I-'/ 



HH. 10S-.X666S 


S&verQl of tho sufrfjostloos laad© by 
preseut ia tbe plaaaii?;: sossioss xflth the liiaal Beach PB 
xior& adopted by the in tt&ir security plaas. Oas of 
these vas tl\e forbidia’? of sticlis oa oeiconstrator *s sij^asj 
ia order to prevent tUoir eae as wea-poiis in the eventi the 
dersoBstrators ^ot; out of eoatroi. 

Other info T/blcls %’;as utilised by the PO *9as that 
contained ia the Police icstruetor Bulletia of 6/17/68, 
entitled ”Eiot Control Pyratiid Fhaslarj Syatess,” ■chick cas 
adopted jier &z by the PB, Phis added a color cods of 
greea, yeiI.o:;» oraai?© and red, -ft'kieh corx'ospo-aded ^ith the 
phases set fortii ia the afore-*isestioaed paoiicatioa. 

it fossud to be essential for the FBI liaisoa 
I'jcats durisfj the plaaaia^ scssitm to eaiataia discreet 
contact \7xth the lioada of the vartoas <itP Cosxsittees chick 
■held i«eotia'’/s prior to the opdRiRg of the Comment ioa* Of 
particular isnportaince t.ras coatact cith the? Kead of 
tUe .di:.>LAor:s or f.esoictAoas Cc-.^r-ittee, for a cci-piete list 
of all of the 8uboei.'i»aittGa scetiaf^s sad the varioun persons 
of Interest to the Bureau pho adca*c>ssed these ConEaittecSr 

It is als '0 pointed out that daily con tact should 
b& 25Sde Pith the Press Eooa at the Coureatloa site or at the 
hotel '?hieh acts as t ae Party headftoarters , -^yhere the 
sch«3dule -of hearijigs, Ceaveation s.^eduie, schedule of fuactloss 
and spseches of the various people ■?;ho appeared before the 
Sabcer;aitteo henr±fifc& v;ore avaiiablo ia c^uai^tity- It vas 
f onad that the Press Iceoa v'ss the best so’arce of . this t^e 
of iLCtdai, aud thsit also axmlXablo frea this source tJcre 
Eisps of the CoaveatioTi Mail and other useful material. 

In regard to ifsps of tho Coavcpti-ca site, large-scale 
£?8ps- of the Coaveatioa Coopieis t/c*re e^ctrei'siy usol'ul lu 
plaaBiug asslguacsuts, and these 'i?ere obtciEod fren a 
sauber of s-ources, iaclTidiag the I'D, the telephoao cospany 




vAA^ki i^Xji.\f j^L-*ij£.ii. 


A-tewi.«.t i'ij-t?^ Ots«C^a ru&S Oi tiiQ 

t^GsavGUtiasa Cfeaples to fecllitat-a tlioii- pJtsriiilssg* 


St t,’£lte 


noted pax-feiii*^ simes withia the Cewsveation 
Cc*saplo 2 r -ims St a preailim aad coatrollod Isy GOP security 


J. 

V 


J *f 


par&isg for ¥BI ©sin^rg^sacF veiiicies is s-t?ai,3Labio, 


Q*ji?scna m?.cr^ ■ 


Startis??*: tt;$> prior to and t?p patil tlie day 

sOxOfe tue CoavoiitlciSj t?e rocc-ived 5s00d aajK*« ci»ec.lc 

fron Seer Jt . -srvic© ar^p-ioycco ox tire kotols 
w^auAda s;‘r:3 sa-d iivr’ dOeiiiCit^arters ^ 

Ar^sirs l/Siieria^ iisE Sjoccrity Sorv'xcas. siid ooa’Ccsaioa persoaaeX- 

^^ovic“^s of ttics c ,tr:Cf-:rals:T: t^.c;•»3 Far-^ioas ^;?ore 
cpadacted Ptiinly py sociirity racial ricatid ;i-^c‘sts, since 
taey ax*c rsoirt isnaxiisr v/itli oecarity iafo dissof::l?jatios 
Fro&0dor€s , 



BSI 1O5-I06S5 


VonvBUtxim sjouiiiet, Xitii-iiiij. vG? ^ 

tie iegat loss , tixs’lv iiotcls af;d tcleplioste Bisssbsrs 

Alphabetical toiephoso listing ox CoEaslttee 
ChalTiaaa, nev;s i-.©dia, officers 

Map of Convolution Ccsipies: and Coiwaation Hall 

Hap of Miassi Beach, listing hotels occupied 
by various delegations anti thciar addresses 

Schedule of Cci^aitteo hearic;;s preceding Convent ios 

Personnel ^sssigued to Convention, their duties, 
Cowffontxou texopnonu number , and ho-io telephone 
mmber 


This vm;u of cocsiderablc value in iriforr-isg all 
personnel re detnlls of the Convention, parts.cuiariy Agenta 
i7ho, during the couriju of tb© Cv-s'vention, v&ro renaia*ed to 
liandlsi I'egular iai'ootlriative av^signaients and locate delegates 
and £s.o??s media persoanei for iatervioo”. 

DISSrilllTATlOH OZ? Br'lOjrSThATIOH ir?PO SH ■ 
gSCUh.ITY^ l;Z:CIAL Al'D IIOi:-~rCl.XTICAL ' OAGiniSATICiTS 

Ixxfo re possibly disruptive dsnonstratioas being 
planned or organised, of ec*urse, saiist be dissesisated as 
recoi%'e£i, first orally to Secrot Servi.ca, Military Intelligence, 
U*S., Attoi’nsy, txml PC, The Bureau then must fcs inforr.od 
by teletype ia Xorra suitable icr temediate dissemiaatioa i£ 
aecc‘-:;:',ary 5 v-’ith no Aci.ninistrat;xv3 data in the body, £oliov;cd 
iffiKJOdrateiy by a oenfirmlng air^el and hUU^ Vp until the 
dy ti.e Conveation *,:eat. Inio sessioa, oral disscminatioii y/ss 
handled from the lliaini Office^ 

By the tirie the Convention started, nn PBI ItesI: 
had b'VG-n set up ia the Coaventiwn Ccmplem. Tnis dcah u'ss 
locafec-d is ixsssediate ■pro;ii£iity to the Hisml Beach CosGsand Post, 


4 < 


/» 




X0S-1S665 


tiio Military IntelX-ifiesscs desJtj nnd the Secret Service ' 

the latter separate sad distinct frosj^ l>«t Ir ismiediats 
cG2i:iita5.ca’tioa with tho Secret Service CoKJsas?.tl Post located at 
Eiiother poiat in the Coavontioa Complex. Ifjs.jed.iate disseciastloa 
of inio colreetGd from ail sources was- tiieraal'tcr dissexairtatc-d 
to, ao well as received xaterestad ageacies at that 

point*. 

Upon compietioa of the desfOBstrations by the 
various ornanisistions at the clone of each day, 

a GGpai'ate teletyjic In form sai table for i^'ineci&te 
diGscair-oties, v/ith no ^daisistrative info ia the foody, 

'■-aa sent to tlio Bureau, foiiowod that day or the next day 
iv?y aix a xr cd aao. X.Xw.f.^ . 

Also, a daily j^ffaxiary teletype, cover lag all 
denonstratiotia atid cfmd&ions gonoi-ally, with a cat-oXf 
fcf ISsUO rrsidKif“ht, was sent every day the Cenveatioa was In 
session. This sar:.iar 7 wae and Khould foe clear, coacise, and 
without Aesiiaiotx'ative iaio la the body, bat at the end, 
xn order that iEauediate disseiaiBatiOB Bight be Bade by the 
Bureau if desired. 


pr;BS0mi'"L Aim t:ssm¥:'wms 


rnmna^Tr^ (Socret Sert^ico) 

Thirty BoAf^ento , rhich the Bureau mttl^oriised, were 
used by Secret Service os protective asais^arerits. Eif'ht were 
nccdixi cotmecticn wxtk tho protcictloa of th© four priucipsi 
c^iididstcr. at thoir Ci^mintion rcsiteuces* Tub were used at 
ike ton i“ato3 ox the Coaveatioa 5.;ail. Tho re;i’aiSJdei' ,vith 
the oMccptic-n of three on reiiof nasigaaeuts, rc-re used ou 
^/arioits survoiliaaco wests vithis tho EaJ.l. Approxir-atcly 
Bid. Poderal and locsX ajjelsts fz'cr; the other agencies were 
utilised M'lthln the* Convention Complex, 


iCnsrsX 


Oar iicn xssaally were -oa iB«»hOiir shifts- Their 
pcac xfes to recognise any parson who laightie s 


S 


I 




4israptiye isi'laeae&f a. Mispict-oms .bal,gs tin liis 

l>ersfin wbictt ®.lgjit be a. .f’trea.mc *r a siackag-® wbiefe 

aigtit Ise an explosiye. 

At ©a-cls of tfee Coay«atloa Hall eatraaccfs » tliere 
■sas a.t iisast owe unllarmBd Atmy i'rsiin Reprs&sentative, wte 
was respoasil:»l« foir t icfc«t ta&iag ai»<J credeatiaJ e^xasiljaatsiofij, 
a tiaiforsaed polieeaasi 4 » barsdlc tmj obstreperous persoa 
a.gair;st wbom tba l^'raia r*pre3eBtatxve woalrl be wiiliag to 
eseecute as affidavit to support aa arrest, aa FBI Agsat, aad 
a plaiiiciothes detective from Kia».i or Miami Beacb* la tlis 
event of an.y untoward incldsat, a Secret Service Afeat ■would 
be iiaiasdiately a'?'.aS,lasilo £o tull\x^ t&rou5;h is kaadiiag. in 
order tbat no one 'would have to leave his post. 


Four af.ents , IncladlBg the Security Supervisor, ,«er«' 
out duty at the FBI Desb, near tae Police Cotm&nd Post, da two . 
12 *“lioor s;btf'«;a3, t>or the purpoyni at lsu;:.odia'i0 dissesaiaatioa of 
inforsat'ion, insuring the proctctive Agents assigned to Secrot 
SeTvic0 wero fulfill lEg their respons ioii it ics , aad ii.t£oiriag. ■ 
Boreau Interests were protected veaerallj by being' oa the. 
Beam arid 'Imediately kiiowledgea ble of pertinent infern&tion •. 
aad incidents iJisido and outside the Convention CoapXex.- 

Four Agents, -two saemrity and two racta.1, during 
the t‘®o weeks prior to the Convent ion were assigned to ■ -coll-ect 
and dissejaisiato .i&format ion relating to the organ lv.at Ions 
plaani'ag ctesoastratlows?. 


IHiring the days the Convention was ia session, 
s.ir 'BiG'e were txscupled i-n bringing their inf or«a ties 

up-to-date j contacting inforaants, -sources, undjississting 
in cioiferag© of the ■dewostrations on the stree't. Th©y ware 
©a duty at least Ifo's 10:00 AH ta. aidaight. 

S.t.» other AijentSf imj'ludiag iae itacial Supervissr^ 
were also-' on 'the street in tb& vlciaity of GCiP 


mi iQ5~166S& 


iieackiBarters » and/or- tke Conventioa Eall and the eSf-M-detes 
&0'6c*is, to cbsorvo tlio prc-:*ress, extent ttnd satnre of the 
denenstratione as they toe,-; place. T’-iey oero assisted, at 
vi£,'-es hy other iigea'is, such as conditions required. 


ST3E0CSl4HirCE T’SLEPS 




OPHT-^TOa 


Three stonc^raphers ©ere assigned to take lao-^t oiJ 
the OoaifsntlOG cor.'aswaixiatioas ccs-jaonciag: one v&elz hef.or& 
and duriasc the Can-^esition -* one during tlio day, one irom. 

4s 00 K,l to 12:00 xalilnight , and one over the ©eel: end. 

ii telephano oporetor -©as assigned to- keep the 
ZTitXtchheard opvn to 12:00 r-idnight froia the night 
before, tiirou-iu the Coavcniion. 

Pi1DT€GTiAH!S OF SU3?Ffi^I7C3 .... 

To t'-r.-.ist i,ii ide?.-»;.liyiiig any au'byersive ©ho u’lght 
be 3 disruptive inXluenee, .‘ecret Service fur&isted to each 
officer tmd h.gont m f-roup ox 27 photoyrfipl'-s of xmecsirnble 
per-soes ’cho sight he expectvu to try to ester the Conveatioa 
llail., Tiio Hix5ui Office alto supplied te each of its o©n 
/igonfcs, photoya'nphs ox ioenl Caban c;:iie.o ©ho have psi'ticipated 
In. bonbiags or rloien 'it* i*\**^*-"^ fCf ticsj local hltiQh oii’lioimiists, 
lioo Leftists, and pei.vr.o.ns on the agitator inder;. 


cciriPfincATiorc 


Cohpl 


In the scsutiv.'est hi-.sso 5 r.eafc of the Gouveatieij 



im 1QMBQB5 


VtCjTw wXLii %A <-'u L*i.(.uvf t^Xv?»>lAv>t!£tu XXiitj y 

telGirision set tuBcd to the p-ertiaoat channsi of tiie 

prccoedio^s on tho CoiiVQntxou flooi', a poi’tabie radio 
treoioaittcr , rmd ts?G KoXtjccn ciaiisriaed laaady-" talkies. 

T'he-se two Eel trots Utaits trero «se4 ia iiialataiain«: contact 
with OUT /igents v/kea thoy vare at atsother point in the 
Convesstloa Coiapiest. Four Eoltroa tfeits v;ere nsec! by the 
street Agyents observing astd reporting pregross and estent 
of sctivltles in pro.rress outside the Con*,-eatioa Cojaplcjs 
ijs the areas set aside for deaonstratioiis^ 

The Eeitrofi Baits wore particularly effective, 
aes-iig light, hrmdy, iHcoisspicisoiss and fu 2 *nisiied excellent 
s'eceptioii ever the whole Coaveetion COKplox. They were used 
£jii <;>cveral ccca:^icii43 to v/li»E cue £iax!S station 

at liiassl froni fXiatii Beach. 

Xu cosj-sectios with coiriuaicaticns. note- that a 
elcse liaison t?as in effect with Soiithe'ra Bell toleplione 
soem'ity o£f3,eialn, wdio v;oi‘e oritru;*>to€l x;lth tho o^^erall 
security of the vast rad ccr;li<a tolcvisioa circuits, telephoae 
■circuits, etc. T.hc-ao personae .1 ware charged aofc only 'with 
the physical plant security, but were ei;pioyec1 to be on the 
iooI:o- 2 tt and ’'sweep'* for eieetronie eavesdreppiag a«d/or 
Tfiretap attempts. 21© ouch attr.ptsi were reported. 

AI^ITTMiCE m COin^imMl of iLC*BSES 


The first day of the Couvcatioii, it was learned 
through CLirJiKCE TO'JlbXS^ Chairoan, Bi vision of yinos^itios , 
GGB J&tional Cosiwittce, eonta-ct with whea had already been 
esiublished by an Treat, that ilLFiI /iBKidtVTCHT of the laouthem 
Chrxctlan leadership Ceafcronce (5CLC) hed, approached him 
witi'. a requaet lor he tichots, IBhaES infort^ed bin tickets 
v*ero practically uaebtainebis, and that the one who coaid 
po:^eib.e.y cor.o up with any at that late date woalci i>a STY 


ELZIC, OOP Chaii-£;?m. In rsforring this reru 




to BLISO, 


TO ;'’;S made the otaervatisn tint it rTyiit be bettor to Ivive 
tlicce paopl-a cool aati <|uict ia 'the gallory than <?. 05 «OEStratiisg 


Oil the street. 


Through TCriliES, 




?ere able to laar-a two 


8 



m 105-16665 


feSitS’f; Itbfi rirr/iTtirsfr sr^^rxscs-j'n nn-ri~ r^sfrt 

tickets, inciudiat tt;o bo?: seats, bad been o?3taiaed hj hiss 


for ilr.-:^ii2?AT13Y sad !iis foIic-vers» Tfcc Aaeat -cvas able to 


es:aEJiae the tickets and detersiiiia tbe j:articuiar sectiona 
ia ’T/bick tbey \j*ere located. This info v^is k ’todiateiy 
x’asfsislied to Secret Service and the liiasi Bciich I'D, in order 
that they coaid be Xore’sjarKed and take apprc«|..riate action to 
facilitate tiieix xaovOiSeat into and E^aiataia ordsi' v^ben 
ikBBHIliiTIfS' and his foll-oissrs subsecuentl-y eatered and were 
seated in the Hall, Tlmoiirik TOViass, it possib3.e a2.so to 
obtain the sarie type info when a lesser mmbsr of tickets 
x?ere f iirnisl,ei npoB request to /iBSSlJAbiFf and bis folio^/ers the 
nest day* 


Chicago Kcy desire to lay the .grouriia’ork for 
receit^iag similar info disring WMCQMa 


irl-i ^i:*« Jf, 


b6 


On the third day of tb© ^onventioa, in Xdberty 
City, a black district iu lliajai, the SCLC had obtained a 


:b7C 


ncetiag hall for ASiillhVfHT to speak at a rally. 


xXe, 


however, did not appear as aimouncecL 5To ir?d already 
leaxEic-d of this, and had inforEicd the intrifres tied authorit ies . 
following the i^ally, which was led by 


tosum^ SCLC leader la racial distarbances began to 

ocenr with youf^g blacks throwing bottles and i-ocha at piasaxag 
white autonohiles* Thia clof’eaerated iato a fnli-scale r'iofc, 
for >.;hich lac Plorida HationaX Guard had to be called out to 
avL&ll. and a curfew established. 


3>aria,g the first day, the 2*131 desk at the 
Convention 'ilail vzh able to i‘nlfi3.1 initial dissemination 
roaponsibillties wS.tli respect to this ijattcr, and to obtain 
info relo-tive to the situation as it developed, Xa fact, the 
Governor yloi.tod the Z\insa± Doneh Coritr;£>nu Post and. wns forieied 
by tbs CO rojircisentativos and Ploiwtda 7:?atioa!ii Guard reprep-.entati-i'e; 
v:ho occuded s-its'*di-nk in the Foat, prior to dt-eiding to alert 
a ad ail out ■Eh.e Gnax^dj who wex^o- thereof tor placed tiadox’ eoxsgiaad 
Ox the Sheriff. 



m 105~lg6S5 


‘irhe &hove isdicatcs tiie desirabiilts? of osir ha'^isg: 
a deck aear tke Pol-ico Cocissiid Test, as hi this case^ ia 
order tkat ■so caa falflii our osa dicsexalaatioa respoissiMlltios 
ijEiaediateiy and likoslse be in si jsositios of isiaediatel:? 
receiirlnjt pertiaoat iafo darlag: tbe course of a de\'elopias 
dis tiirbaace . 

B025& 'fHFjj.m - BLUB hmm 


&a a scatter of iatorest* in order to s¥oid 
possible panics* tbo t?ord be.r^b"''’ is norer cccd by Secret 
Service la 'fcbe vicinity of tlie €oaveatioa 1‘aXl* A borab 
tfesreat is refeiered to os a blue li^'ht slttaal* If at any 
ftijac earin':? tbe course of tK*’» Con^r^ntiovt threat ic^s 

received, a miaiber of hiGOtmpi-cuou-^ hluw li^fets would fo© 
tsirced on in the coiiiD'V. I'^-creaftcr, all crotcctive 
parsosmei ctsuld search nssipaed areas for the boL'-b. Only 
oa$ lice report ms reccAVect L.ariag tk&. course of the 
C0ffi'^7o>5tioa« In the event any actual hotsb or suspected 
bosh Jiad boon discovered, lerret Service, i.hoso saaia 
responsibility is tiis Candida tos, would have? siade the 
decision to aove thca out. St wonld have been the decision 
of the Coaveation desurity Office, aad/cr uitlmtely the OOP 
Cfeairtian, to evaciiate tho liall ot-liort/ise . !t;his, of course, 
did not Isuppea, 


SOElTT-XFSeiTIOH 


Secret Service issued to each of the 3d protective 
fdjQsts and the Coisaaad I’iist Ascents, plastic lapel ta^s, the 
fsi-TjB of a bine and rmito, coa-f-'niniir? th© letter ^’S" 

and an i&cce nuajhsr, ’This 'ki’? entitled the- wearer to 
proceed into and to any point whatBosver in the Convention 
Coinple::. I'c was accessary on a nti 2 ;.-bcr of cccaaioas for 
street Ajjents to oater the Ccv.iie>: to eoafor with control Agents- 
Althcmrh tlio street i.yeats litd been issueei tc-iaporary 
security passes, it -vas foimd timy couM hax^e s-oved about 
Eioro ireely if they liaci had the iapoi tag. In eonncction 
with tixo iap>. 


2'i tags. 


and the riscessity for additional Agent 


10 



im. 103-16665 


personnel to utilise tlien, it is noted n*tr;^€3rotis rensicstfs 
for iavestigatloa car.e ia during liSPCCil, Tliose requests 
aati/or costpialats frcri thr^gats to deiesaites to 

lijsers oaatloa i:.at terra -and opeci-al inqairy type interrie^s?s , 
^iiose ±nv&st±^^tios& required iKStediato ntteation., and 
tiio lad: of lapoi l#a*J:;i:cs asslijncd to /iysnt persoimsX not 
diroctiy concerned \:x'ch MEPC-ZCl aecniiSty required tent these 
spend additional tlBO to gain entrajicie to the 
faellitios ox the Co..iTenticii» 

Oj^Chmiail 

The GGt-np prerlcusly doccrih'^d vrorlicd very 
efficiently* The only disruption '>5as the isst-sirmte 
jiaise check requests, for ’rkrun. \?e had to call in clerical 
hud /'vent percoacoi v«ti Suneaj’* Chicayc ray untied n-a to r/Uch 
iast-uinute requests and jjake every effort to have Sscrat 
Service snhr<it tmm at the earliest posslhl© p\enGnit, 

It sight have keen scjie isiprovonant to have hud an 
additiosai stenographer on duty froB 4-:0a F;.l to 
siidalgiit during the n'ates of the eoavention beia;; in secsion, 
since it ^as ncrcet^sary for the one- stenographer on duty os 
teo particularly husv nights to stay until 2:00 to 


cojso2.ct© the nccas 


although sIig' turaod mt over 


60 pages tm those nlthts. 


Hopandisg upoa the set-up at Chicago, and if it 
appears it r/ill bo nccossary for street f gents to nove 
cjhlcklsr into the Cos-tv-^'a-tion CcispIeB at arty tir-e, it stsy 
he i.'-oll to esdesv'or to obfcairi froa Secret Service exti’s 
lapel tags to facilitate their Boveaeat Into asd eboutthe 
Sosvsn i ion Cc:-'*pies * 



Demonstration Area 


Demonstration Area 






OPTIONAL FORM NO. 10 

.MAY 1962 EDITION 

GSA Fiy4R (41 cfr) ioi>ii.e 


UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

' ■ Memorandum 


TO : 

SAC, MIAMI 

(80-1353) 


date: 

8/5/71 

be 

b7C 

FROM : 

SA 





subject: 

DEMOCRATIC 

NATIONAL CONVENTION 





MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA 
SUMMER, 1972 


In order that this Information may be readily 
available in connection with DEMCON - 1972, there are 
attached the following: 

Air tel to Bureau, 8/12/68, setting forth obswrva- 
tions of Miami concerning coverage of REPC0N-1968.i 

Chicago letter, 5/6/68, enclosing format for use 
of all offices in furnishing information re individuals who, 
because of their background and past activities, could 
logically be expected to appear in Chicago and engage in 
disruptive activities during DEMCON - 1968. 

Bureau airtel, 7/22/68, setting forth guidelines 
for all offices in furnishing information re such persons. 





1/- Miami 
HRA/dk 
( 1 ) 


(Att 3) 




5010-108 -01- 


Buy U.S. Savings Bonds Begularly on the Payroll Savings Plan 





A POLICE DEPARTMENT | 



■MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA ^ 

TO: 

Major 

DAIE: 10 November 1971 


Capt. 


FROMi 

Gapt. 

SUBJECT: Convention Securl^ 


This date I receive d a telephone call from Det/Sgti 

Police Depattmenti He seid that a taction of the Weathemen 

Moveient knowi as the May Day Collective is holding a nationwide convention in 
East Lansing on January 14, 15, and 16, 1972# The sole purpose of the c onvention 
is to draw up plans to disrupt the Democratic National Convention. Sgt. 1 
said he has notified the Secret Service and the FBI and is sending a letter 
covering our telephone conversation, 

Sgt, said that the May Day Collectiv'e was responsible for the massive 
dffliofellon in fchington, D.O., earlier this year. I 


'-5.fllE0 

"•MtMlIM.MtllltM# 


BJFja 









POLICE DEPARTMENT 
RDCK.Y PDMERANCE 


f f 

0^ ‘TfCCami 

FLORIDA 33139 


‘VACATIO'NLAND U. S. A.’ 


Conmanding Officer 
Detective Division 

izn MERIDIAN AVENUE 
telephone: B34-7511 


11 November 1971 





S.A.C. Kenneth Whitaker 
Federal Bureau of Investigation 
3801 Biscayne Boulevard 
Miami, Florida 


'^e received a telephone call on Wednesday, Nov ember 10, 1971, from Sergeant 

Police Department. Since the 

subject of this intelligence intormation concerns the security at the 
• PemopT-at-ir. National Convention, I am enclosing a copy of our memo for your 
information. 1 intend to correspond with the Intelligence Unit of the 
East Lansing Police Department and attempt to get any information they may 
be able to gather at the January meeting of this revolutionary group. I 
will, of course, keep your office apprised of any further intelligence. 

Any assistance that your Michigan field offices may be able to render will 
be appreciated. 

Please tie assured of our assistance and cooperation at all times in matters 
of mutual Interest. 

Very truly yours. 


ROCKY POMERANCE 
CHIEF OF POLICE- 


Commanding Officer, Det. Div. 




> 

NOVI S1Q71 



OPTIONAL FORM NO. lO 

MAY t962 EOmON 

GSA FPMR (41 CFR) 101-1I.6 




UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

Memorandum 


% 



TO 


SAC, iiimi <47~new) 


date: 11/26/71 


FROM : 


subject: 


SA 






IMPEHSOHATIOH 


■b6 

b7C 


J'he following informtion was received from 
south Miami PB, on 11/24/71. 


Recently an individual identify ing^ histself as 

attempted to make 


reservatio!^ for 260 rooms at tae saxony Hotel — Miami Beach , 
Fla., for the period Isetween S/15-7/15/72. | [ stated 
that he was laaking the reservations on behalf of a Govern- 
ment agency, but declined to name the agency involved. 

Reference to Miami City Directories revealed si 
fisting for a m 1 at the above address and 

icated his employment as ’’Claims Dept., Pan Am Air”. 

On 




be 

b7C 


b6 

b7C 

b7D 


Miami indices negative, 


In view o f the proximity of the reservation dates be 
Ito the Democratic Hati oiml Conventio n, b7c 

bt 


requested by 
the above iniorsmtioa was furnished Agent \ 




Jecret Service, on 11/26/71. 




It is recorsiionded that a new case under the 47- 
classif ication be opened to develop information ro the 
subject’s activities. Any pertin ent data obtained^hoald 


3 

9-^ 


also be furnished Agent 

2 - 47-yew.^' 

- 80-D-E5ICO 72 



BFC731S" 



— 

FBI -MIAMI, 


Buy U.S. Savings Bonds Regularly on the Bay roll Savings Blan 


b7D 





rasos UA CODE 
6S33Ak1 1-S-7S DCVJ 
3SC4AM HIT EL 1/9/72 RLE 
TOf DIRECTOR AlTKs DID 

BOSTON (VIA UASHIHeiOlI) 
DETROIT (VIA tJASHIHeTOtO 
MIAMI (VIA WASHINGTON 
SAH DIEGO 
PITTSBURG 
FROM MILWAUKEE 



CHICAGO (VIA WASHINGTON ) 
DErJVER (VIA WASHINGTON) 
NEW YORK (VIA WASHINGTON) 
PHILADELPHIA 





YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY (YIP), "PRE CONFERENCE", ONE 
SEVEN THRU. NINE SEVENTY-TWO, r-JADISOR, WISCONSIN, IS-YIP 
00 « MILWAUKEE, 


SOURCE ONE, WHO HAS FURNISHED RELIABLE INFORMATION IH TH 




PAGE TtJO 


THE YOUTH INTERUATIOU PARTY, ALSO KKOUH AS YIPPIES, IS A 
LOOSELY KHIT, AMTI-ESTABLiSHnEUT, REVOLUTiOt^ARY YOUTH ORGAUIZATIOn 
FORMED lU UEI'I YORK CITY ItJ JAfJUARY, ORE UIUE SIXTY-HEIGHT, 


AtH^OUUCED THE FOLLOUira COflFEREfJCE A6EUDA FOR THE DAYS OF OHE EIGHT 


E?]D PAGE T^O 



PAGE THREE 




DASH Kiije SEVEHTV^TUOs 

COHE) DISCUSSina ORGiniZAXIOtJ OF A "JOIHT DAY"DEt‘^3KSTRATI0[J 
TACTICS FOR DAY OF FIVE OtJE SEVEKTY^-TUO TO BE HELD BY YIP ACTIVISTS 
IC state capitals throughout the UUITED states, purpose of THIS DAY 

l^OULD BE TO SHOW PROTEST AGAItlST ALLEGED DISCRIHIHATORY STATE LAWS 
PROHIBITING USE OF MARIJUANA# 

(TWO) DlSUSSltiS PROTEST TACTICS FOR MIAMI DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL 
CONVENTION# (REPUBLICAN CONVENTION IN SAN DIEGO WAS NOT TO BE 
DISCUSSED AS YIP LEADERS ON WET COAST HAVE REPORTEDLY ALREADY AGREED 
ON TACTICS FOR THAT GATHERING#) 

THE MIAMI ACTION ACCORDING TO THE AGENDA WOULD INCLUDE 
DISCUSSING E^EANS OF OBTAIfJING SUPPORT FOR MIAMI PROTEST PLANS AKOUNG 
YIP PEOPLE AND ANOUNG OUTSIDERS* ALSO TO BE DISCUSSED IS THE TOPIC OF 
ESTABLISHING A COMMUNICATIOE3S NETWORK TO IMPLEMENT THE MIAMI ACTIOE^# 

■b6 
b7C 
■ b7D 


END PAGE THREE 




AXTE«DEES PLAri TO ISSUE A PRESS RELEASE 00 LATER THEO OBE 


TEB BEXT SHOUIBG COBFEREHCE RESULTS ♦ 

COOFEREBCE ACTIVITIES FOR DAY OF OBE MBS BEKT UILL FEATURE 
SI'IIBAR ALSO AT SAI«T FRA0C1S CEBTER OVER PERIOD OF OWE TO FIVE PM* 
GOKFEREUCE WILL THEB TERMIBATE* 

UNITED STATES SECRET SERVICE* HILWAOKEE, 0MB ONE THIRD KILITARV 
IHTELLieEMCS CROUP* MADISOM* AMD WADISOM POLICE DEPARTHEMT NOTIFIED* 
/©MIMISTRATIVE* 

RE MITEL OBE THREE LAST* 

ABOVE IMFORHATIOB FURBISHED RECIPIENTS AS IfJDlVIDUALS 
mon THEIR AREAS ARE ATTEBDING COiFEREMCE* MIAMI* SAM DIEGO* 1 1 
AMD UASHIKGTOtJ D*C* * SHOULD ADVISE LOCAL LAW ENFORGEMEf^T OFFICIALS/ / 
C? PROTEST PLANS OUTLINED ABOVE* * 

ANTICIPATE ACQUIRING LISTS BY 

OBE MIME INSTANT SHOUIBG IDENTITIES FO ALL CONFERENCE ATTENDEES. 


BUREAU TO ADVISED OF OBE MIMS CONFERENCE ACTIVITIES* 





ke00 Sttimtciitrrnal 


GENERAL OFFICES 

NEWS BUILDING, 320 EAST 42 "P STREET 
NEW YORK 17, N.Y. 


C. EDMONDS ALLEN 
DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL SERVICES 


November 29, 1971 


Room 2bb2 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Washington, D. C. 20535 


United Press International will again in 1972, as it has for all the major 
political conventions starting in 19^8, operate a special wire for the 
Democratic Convention in Miami Beach and the Republican Convention in San 
Diego. 


The wire will be patterned on the WCNS wire and run by 
staff. 


and his 


The circuit — a 2i<-“hour operation — mil begin its daily cycle at 8:00 a.m., 
opening with a calendar of convention events such as press conferences, 
caucuses, the schedules of the various candidates, etc. Following will be 
the main convention story, sidebars on related developments, accounts of 
candidates’ activities, items on significant state delegations, demonstrations, 
statements and activities of pressure groups^ and so forth. Additionally, of 
course, all major news stories will be covered on a running basis. 

Correspondents advisories will be carried frequently to let those on the 
circuit know, for example, that the text of the platform is ready, that the 
convention program will be available at noon, that two candidates plan to 
meet in a hotel at 2:30 p..m., of upcoming news conferences, rescheduled 
caucuses, etc. 

The wire mil open one week ahead of the convention for those who plan to 
cover meetings of the platform, resolutions, credentials and other committees. 
It will close after the convention adjourns and the new national committee 
meets. 

As you can imagine, setting up this circuit is a major undertaking, requiring 
involved arrangements with the telephone company for circuits and teleprinter 
reservations. It would be a great deal of help if you would signify your 
interest at the earliest time. The rate for a single installation for one 
convention is $k-50.00. The rate for a single installation at both conventions 
is $850.00. The rate for a second installation at e ither or both co nventions 
is $400.00 per installation. / | y,msv|:p ~ 

0^31971 / 




h6 

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During 1972, for the first time, the convention vrire mil be available all 
i\over the United States. The service mil be available from the -last "week in 
* ' June to the first eieek in Sentfiwben at .^1.000.00. No nartial service will 
11 be accepted as the installation line and equipment costs are such that there 
is practica l ly no saving on a partial service. 

Enclosed are forms for ordering this circuit at one or both conventions. Upon 
receipt of the order form \ 7 Q mil reserve a printer or printers for you at the 
locations you designate. Billing mil be done later to you or to whomever you 
indicate . 

With all good wishes, I am 


Sincerely, 


CEA;ld 

encs. 


\ 




Date: 


■b6 


United Press International 
220 East 42nd Street 
Ne\^f York, New York 10017 


1972 Convenolon Sex-vlue 


Rates - $450.00 for first printer and $400.00 for each additional 
■printer in either city. 

Number of 
Printers 

Democratic Convention - Miami Beach 


Convention Hall_ 

Hotel 

Other Locations: 


Republican Convention - San Diego 

Convention Hall 

Hotel 

Other Locations: 


Amount of payment accompanying order: 


(Organization) 


By: 


(please keep one copy of the order for your records) 



{ 




1 - 13 - 7 '^ * 


CODS 



aspn URSErJT i/10/72 LSK 
TO DIRECTOR ATT* DID 
viiAi-ii 
DEW VORK 
SAD DISCO 


WFO 


FROM MILWAUKEE 




YOUTH iniERfmiXOMAL PARTY CYIP) **PRS GOUTOEtJGE^" JAGUARY SEVEN 
through UifiE# SEVEHTV^^TWOt MADISOf)^ WISCOHSIfJy IS DASH YIP* 

00 8 MILWAUKEE* ONE HUNDRED DASH ONE NINE THREE FIVE FIVE* 


demonstration DURIHS THE FORTHCOMING POimCAL CAMPAIGN* 
ONE HUNDRED DASH ONE EIGHT NINE FOUR NINE* 



A SOURCE I WHO HAS PROVIDED RElAlBLE INFORMATION IN THE PAST 




■bo 

b7C 

b7E 


THE YOUTH lUTERtJATIOnAL PARTY, ALSO UKOUU AS YIPPIES, IS A I 

LOSSia.y KUIT, AUTI-ESTABLISHMEUT, revolutionary youth ORGAN’* ; 

iZATion formed in mi York city January, niUEXEEn sixty eight, f 

SOURCE SAID THE RELEASE HAS OFFICALLY GIVEN TO THE MEDIA, READ ! 

A EA DISO U i 

IKJDERGROUnD nEUSPAPERl TOM FORCASE, AN EAST COAST YIP ACTIVIST ^ 

C'JASHINGTOn, D,C* OR nYG)| AND AH UUDREGROUnD FEMALE ) 

RESIDING OUT OF STATE* TIS RELEASE MB GIVER OVER PERIOD ELEVEN 
AM TO ELEVEN THIRTY AM JANUARY TEH LAST IN THE STATE CAPITOL 
BUILDING ROTUNDA, MADISON, TO REPRESENTATIVES FROM UISGOKSItJ STATE 
rSUSPAPERS AND TELEVISION STATIONS, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS AND THE 
UNDERGROUND PRESS SYNDICATE, 

THE PRESS RELEASE, IN PART, ADVISED AS FOLLOWS 5 

END page im I 

1 

i 

■i 

i 

f 

A 

i 



PAGE THPEE 

IT said the i/ADISOH ‘*PSE GOJJPEEEnCE” VJAS A SECRET HATIOHAL 
FLAfJHIEG COnPERSHCE AXTESDEH nv vtp j>siecATES TRuw IHkuuuhoUX 
THE COUUTRY* THE FOLLOtlina FUTURE VIP FUnCTiOtlS WERE REPORTEDLY 
AGREED TO AT THIS COUFEREUGE? 

OtIE, MGH EIGHTEEN THROUGH TUEUXY SIK^ SEV©5 TY-TUO •► 

”SPilIfiQ FREER UEEK,** CORSISTIUG OF rJATIQU HIDE STATE REGIONAL 
aAnniKs MEETircss ahd voter registration driver 

TWO* im ONE, SEVENTY -TWO - DAY," CONSISTING OF r^RIJUADA 

£i-:oi:E-in^ lu each state capitol^ along with marches to local areas 

mi so US* 

THREE* MAY ONE THROUGH TWO^ SEVENTY ^TWO - ”SPRIKG PLANT-IUt*t 
COnSiSTIRG OF HATIOUAL MARIUUAtJA SEEED PLAHTIHG CEREMONIES* 

FOUR* JULY OHE THROUGH THREE* SEVENTY * TWO* «UATIOt3AL . 
TRIBAL CGNFEREUCE,” TO BE HELD IN WASHINGTON* D*G*| FEATURING 
MGH LEVS^ DISCUSSIONS BY VARIOUS UATlOrJAL YIP LEADERS* 

FISV* JULY FOUR* SEVENTY-- TWO - THIRD ANNUAL REEFER SKOKE^ 
IN FOR WASHINGTON, D*C** (IJASHIHGTOU MONUMENT) WITH ”ANTI - CIA* 
^EROIN” MARCH TO STEPS OF U* S* CAPITOL* » 

END PAGE THREE 


PiiGE FOUR 


SIK# JULY TUEUTY SEVEt^ SEVEUTY^TUO - ‘’HAYIOUAL CHE 
PumirnoA APPEECX^TZCJ: WAVs'* wiAiu bmmnt i^LKUUlAs XO SHOW/ 
SOLIMniTY WITH GU3AU STRUGGLE FOR LIBERATION# 

SEVEf}^ JULY TUEUTY SEVEN THROUGH THIRTY ONE, SEVEUTY-OnE « ) 

”ZIPPIE PARTY FRESH CIRCUS,** mmi, FLOROIA, A POURED AY PARTY / 
FEATUHIEG All ASSEK3LY OF YOUUa VOTERS CALLED TOGETHER TO SKOU / 
POLITICIANS that unless THE DEHANDS OF YOUTH ARE MET, THE SEVEnTvj 
TWO PRESIDSfinAL ELECTION WILL BE BOYCOTTED# 


EIGHT# AUGUST ONE THROUGH TWENTY, SEVEtlTY^Tl^ - "GRAPES OF 
OATH CARAVAN#" TO SAW DIEGO, GALIFORUIA# 

NX HE# AUGUST TWENTY OWE THROUGH TWENTY FOUR, SEVENTY-TWO - 


"SMOKE GRASS AND KICK ASS," SAU DIEGO ACTION# 

REGARDING THE MIAMI PROTEST TACTICS THE RELEASE SAID YIP 
REPRESEUTATIVES FROM EACH STATE WILL BRING A "ROCK” TO THE CITY# 


Two "ROCK” ARE THEN TO BE CHOSEN TO REPRESENT THE "ZIP-YIP" 

WATIOriAL SLATE FOR PRESIDENTIAL OFFICE# YIPS WILL THEN BE URGED TO 
"CAST YOUR VOTE FOR A ROCK IN SEVENTY TWO," AND TO , "MAKE SEVENTY TWO 


END PAGE FOUR 


PAGE FIVE 

w*« >tww4. 4-tMK^j.i, vMi. *iuw WHii-iruLx uu« nuou i.iJiU iita, L'jttHU. nuu£)l;;!>« 

EKFHASIS WAS PLACED Ofi THE FACT THAT JEKRY RUBItJ AHD ABBOTT 

hoffmah^ ihdividuals who have previously executed considerable 

LEADERSHIP EFFECT IH YIP KAATERS, HAVE BY THEIR OUH RECENT 
DISCRIHIHATIVE ELITIST ACTIVITIES, REtDVED THEHSELVES FEOJ-1 YIP 
rSMBERSHIP* THE KADISOH YIP CONFERENCE, ACCORDING TO THE RELEASE, 

IS AN EVENT TO RE0R6ANI2E THE YIP AND GIVE THIS PARTY NEW DYNAMIC 
LEADERSHIP FOR SEVENTY TWO# 


THE RELEASE ENDED ON SAVING THAI YIPS ARE URGING ACCEPTANCE 
C? THE FOLLOWING OEN POINT PROGRAM FOR SEVENTY TWO* ^UNCONDITIONAL 
SURREfJBER OF UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT* U#S# OUT OF AMERICA NGU»** 



END PAGE FIVE 



PAGE SIK 

Ut S. SECRET SERVICE^ MILWAUKEE,, AMD OUS OWE XHKiii*. wXLiTAKV 
ItlTELLlGinCE GROUP AUD MADISOO POLICE SEPARTHSIT, BOTH 
la MADISOO WERE ADVISED* 

ADMIUlSTRATIVEt Ri MILWAUKEE TELETYPE UAflUARY TE« LAST, 
COPIES OF THIS TELETYPE PURUISHED TO RECIfEWTS AS «PRE COtJFERBDCE” 
PRESS RELEASE CORCERflS MATTERS EFFECTIKS THEIR RESPECTIVE AREAS 
MIAMI, SAM SII60,AMD WFO SHOULD ADVISE LOCAL LAW EUFORCEMSWT // 
ASEOCIES RESARDIKG PROTEST PLAUS FOR THEIR AREAS# 

SOURCE IS | I 

AH LHtI FOLLOWS* 


RFL FBI MIAMI CLR 


a — / 


raO20 tIM FLAIH 
m HI 





1/11/72 


AIRTEL 

TO! SAC, DETROIT 

PROM! SAC, MIAMI (80-1353) (P) 

SUBJECT j D32-DCRATIC MATIOITAL COIWEMTIOM 
MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA 
SU1E5ER OP 1972 


The Miami Beach, Flori da, PD has advised they receive d 
information from Detective Sgt. 


PD that faction of the Weatherman Movement hnovrn as 
the Ma^flDay Collective v;as holding a nation-wide convention in 
East Lansing, Michigan, 1/14-1J/72. The sole pinrpose of the 
convention is to drav; up p lans to disrupt the Democratic 
National Convention. Set. I l had advised the Miami PD 

he had notified the Secret Service and the FBI. 


bo 

b7C 


LEADS 


DETROIT 


At East Lansing- , Michigan. t 


Will furnish Miami disruptive plans for the Democratic 
National Convention that may come out of May Day Collective 
nation— x- 7 ide convention scheduled to he held in East Lansing, 
Oanuary , 1 97 2 . 


2 - Detroit (RM) 
- Miami 
^JJM!nmm 
(3) 





TO* BUREAU (ATTNs TRAINING DIVISION AND DOMESTIC 

INTELLIGENCE DIVISION) 
from': MIAMI <80-1353) 

DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION, MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA, 

JULY TEN TO FOURTEEN, SEVENTY TWO, POLICE LIAISON. 

BEING FORWARDED TO THE BUREAU UNDER SEPARATE COVER BY 
ROUTING SLIP ARE TWO COPIES OF A PROSPECTUS RELATING TO THE 
DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL OONVENTION. MIAMI BEACH PD IS POLICE 
AGENCY WHICH HAS PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITY FOR SECURITY OF 
DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION, MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA, JULY TEN 
TO FOURTEEN, SEVENTY TWO. 


IT APPEARS MIAMI BEACH PD WILL RECEIVE GRANTS PROM LEAA 
IN EXCESS FOUR HUNDRED THOUSAND DOLLARS FOR PREPARATION, 
RESEARCH, TRAINING, EQUIPMENT AND NECESSARY SERVICES IN 






(Priority) 


MM 80-1353 


PAGE TV3D 


HE WILL COORDINATE CENTER PROGRAM UP TO AND 
INCLUDING CONVENTION, HE WILL NOT HAVE POLICE CONTROL RESPONSI- 
BILITY DURING CONVENTION BUT WILL ACT AS CONSULTANT AND AD- 
VISOR, COORDINATING EFFORTS WITH MIAMI BEACH CHIEF OF POLICE 


ROCKY POMERANCE. CAPTAIl 


(NA) MIAMI 


BEACH PD, ONE OF ASSISTANT PROJECT DIRECTORS. 


pONFERRED WITH SAC AND POLICE TRAINING COORDINATOR 

MIAMI OFFICE, FURNISHED PROSPECTUS BEING FORWARDED. HE 
REQUESTED COOPERATION OF BUREAU IN PREPARATION FOR CONVENTION 
WHICH WILL CONCEEiN ITSEI^ WITH RECOGNITION, EVALUATION AND 
CONTROL OF INDIVIDUALS AND GROUPS WHO POSE A THREAT TO THE 
ORDERLY CONDUCT OF CONVENTION PROCEEDINGS, GENERAL WELFARE 
OF COMMUNITY, AND PERSONAL SAFETY OF DELEGATES AND CANIDATES, 

AN IN DEPTH TRAINING C^EUCUEBM FOR ALL POLICE PERSONNEL 


ASSIGNED TO CONVENTION SECURITY CONSISTING OF APPROXIMATELY 


TV5D HUNDRED HOURS BEING PLANNED. APPROXIMATELY ONE HUNDRED 




FD-36 {Rev. 5-22-64) 




Transmit the following in 


(Type in plaintext or code) 


(Priority) 


MM 80-1353 


PAGE THREE 


TWINTY HOURS WILL BE DEVOTED TO SOCIOLOGY, PSYCHOLOGY AND 

OOA (&'i + > C A 

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES, CALCULATED TO BS TOeSUgE THE OFFICERS 
TO ALL POSSIBLE CONFRONTATIONS AND A HUMANE CONTROL OF CROWDS, 
RATHER THAN USE OF FORCE. 

NATIONALLY KNOWN PSYCHOLOGISTS, PSYCHIATRISTS AND 
BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE#? EXPERTS WILL BE USED BOTH IN CONSULTABTE.^ 

AND INSTRUCTOR IN THIS TRAINING PROGRAM. 

H}C^ 

PLANN3© MEETING OP ALL THE BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE AND RELATED 

CCSnSULTANTS to be held at MIAMI BEACH CONVENTION HALL JANUARY 

If 

TWENTY ONE, SEVENTY TWO, WHEN CIRPULAM, METHOD, CONTENT AND 
ALL PHASES THIS TYPE OF TRAINING WILL BE DISCUSSED. 

CHIEF POMERANCE AND PROCffiCT DIRECTOR HAVE SPECIFICALLY 


REQUESTED PRESENCE OP SA 


TRAINING DIVISION, 


AT THIS MEETING. 


REQUESTED BY POMERANCE AND[ 


BECAUSE HIS ADVANCED DEGREE IN SOCIOLOGY, STATUS AS LECTURER 


BEFORE MAJOR ACADEMY AND PACT A REPRESENTATIVE PROM BUREAU 


Special Agent in Charge 


☆ U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1971 -419-135 




MM 80-1353 


PAGE EOUR 

HEADQUARTERS REPRESENTING LAW ENFORCEMENT VIEWPOINT DESIRED. 

STRONGLY RECOMMENDED SA REPRESENT BUREAU AT PRO- 

POSED PLANNING MEETING JANUARY TWENTY ONE, SEVENTY TWO, AND THAT 
RESPONSE BE FURNISHED EXPEDITIOUSLY SO MIAMI BEACH PD CAN 
BE NOTIFIED. 

THE COPY TO DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE DIVISION FOR INFO. 






□ □□□□[]□□□ DDDDDODDDDDDDDDQ 


Routing Slip 

12-25 

Direct _ 

“ XntiGiXigeace 




Date 


X — Xralttl&g 

SAC Blvlsioa - 


FILE 


Title 


MM 80-X353 


-# 


4/72 



ASAC 
Supv. 
Agent 
SE 

ir 

CC 


BBtCGHATIC SATXOHai. 
OJSVasHflOK, MXaHX 
BS ft CH, P TORXOaj 


^tnx 10 to 14, 1972 
^rjOE - 1.I&IS0K — 


RE 


X/X3/72 . 


Steno 

Clerk 


Acknowledge 

Assign Reassign 

Bring file 
Coil me 
Correct 

Deadline 


I 1 Rotor #; _ 

ACTION DESIR 

nOp en Case 


E D 


l { Prepare lead cards 
i i Prepare tickler 
j ~ 1 Return assignment card 
I I Return file 
I I Search and return 
I i See me 
I — I Serial # 


Post ! I Recharge | ~ | Return 
I ] Send to 


I I Submit new charge out 

[ I Submit report by 

□ Type 

Searched 




Deadline passed 
Delinquent 
Discontinue 
expedite 
File 

For information 
Handle 

Initial & return 

Leads need attention jiV 

Return with explanation or notation as to^pefipnj^ ken. 

Ai^tiaciiea is prospectius 
NationaX Conveatiion ment^ioasd in rs£erenced 
as being forwarded to Bureau* 


- Bureau 
3? Jiiami 

(3) 

See^r^^^^n^e side 




In Reply, Please Refer to 
File No. 



AUTOMATIC 

0Z-06-ZO 


Die LAS 


FICATIOH GUIDl^ 


UNITED state’s DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 
FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 


Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
January 14, 1972 



YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY 
"PRE-CONFERENCE" 
JANUARY 7-9, 1972 
MADISON, WISCONSIN 


A first source, who has f urnished reliable 
information in the past, advised on 







This document contains neither recommendations nor 
conclusions of the FBI. It is the property of the 
FBI and is loaned to your agencyi it an d its contents 
are not to be distributed outside your a 



R!AU 


5?J4DEXED„ 
TILED. 


JAN 2 4 1972 


b7I 


tr' u 


it 

{ 



YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY 
‘•PRE-CONFERENCE" 

JANUARY 7-9 j 1972 
MADISON, WISCONSIN 


YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY 

The Youth International Party 
(YIP), also knovm as Yippies, 
is a loosely knit, anti- 
establishment, revolutiona^ 
youth organization formed in 
New York City in January, 

1968. 

Invitations to the Conference were sent to 
approximately 50 YIP leaders throughout the country, 
names and residences unknown to source; and it was 
expected that most of these individuals would attend. 

First source advised that the tentative purpose 
of the Conference was to plan the following; 

(1) Establishment of a national YIP Office, 
either in Miami, Florida; Washington, D. C. ; New York 
City; or Madison, Wisconsin, 

(2) Establishment of a national YIP communications 

network. 

(3) Setting of dates for the National Yl? 
Conference in Madison for the Summer of 1972 wherein 
the YiIp protest tactics for the Miami Democratic Con- 
vention will be finalized. 

Source further advised that no efforts would 
be made to establish an agenda for this Conference until 
Tom Forcade, a YIP activist from the East Coast, arrived 
in Madison on either January 3 or 4, 1972. 



CONFIM^IAL 


GONFIBENTIAL 


YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY 
"PRE-CONFERENCE" 

JANUARY 7=9, 1972 
MADISON. WISCONSIN 


First source advised on 


that 


I announce 

ence agenda for the days of January 8-9, 1972: 


owin 


onrer 


(1) Discussing organization of a "joint day" 
demonstration tactics for May 1, 1972, to be held by 
YIP activists in state capitals throughout the United 
States. The purpose of this day would be to show pro- 
test against alleged discriminatory state laws prohibiting 
the use of marijuana. 


C0NFH5ENTIAL 


tr' fcr' 


t 



YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY 
"PRE-CONFERENCE" 

JANUARY 7-9, 1972 
MADISON, WISCONSIN 


(2) Discussing protest tactics for the Miarai 
Democratic National Convention. (The Republican National 
Convention in San Diego, California, was not to be dis- 
cussed as YIP leaders on the West Coast have reportedly 
already agreed on tactics for that gathering. ) The Mi^i 
action, according to the agenda, would include discussing 
means of obtaining support for Miami protest plans among 
YIP people and among outsiders. 


(3) Discussing the topic of establishing a 
communications network to implement the Miami action. 




SNTIAL 


YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY 
••PRE-CONFERENCE" 

JANUARY 7-9, 1972 
MADISON, WISCONSIN 


Attendees then planned to issue a press release 
no later than January 10, 1972, showing Conference results, 


CONFTONTIAL 






'' 

• . 

t 


• 


CONf^ 

J^TIAL 



YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PART/ 
"PRE-CONFERENCE” / 

JANUARY 7-9, 1972 
MADISON, WISCONSIN 





It was decided on January 9th that a Madison 
press release would be given bn January 10, 1972, at 
which YIP events, designed to plan sp ' " 











I 




YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY 
"PRE-CONFERENCE” 

JAIRJARY 7-9, 1972 
MADISON, WISCONSIN 


■bo 

b7C 

b7D 


Source said the release was officially given 
to the media, read by I l a staff member of 

"Take Over"; Tom Forcade; and an unidentified female, 
residing out of state. This release was given over 
the period 11 to 11:30 a.m. , January 10th, in the 
State Capitol Building Rotunda, Madison, to represen- 
tatives from Wisconsin State newspapers and television 
stations, the Associated Press, and the Underground 
Press S 3 mdicate. 

The press release, in part, advised as follows: 

It said the Madison "Pre-Conference" was a 
secret national planning conference attended by YIP 
delegates from throughout the country. 

The following future YIP functions were 
reportedly agreed to at this Conference: 

(1) March 18-26, 1972 - "Spring Freak Week," 
consisting of nation-wide state regional planning 
meetings . and voter registration drives. 

(2) May 1, 1972 - "J Day, "consisting of 
marijuana smoke-in, in each state capitol, along with 
marches to local area prisons. 

(3) May 1-2, 1972 - "Spring Plant-In," 
consisting of national marijuana seed planting 
ceremonies . 


CONFIDENTIAL 


11 



co: 


lENTIAL 




YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY 
"PRE-CONFERENCE'' 

JAJJUARY 7-9i 1972 
MADISON, WISCONSIN 


(4) July 1-3, 1972 - "National Tribal Conference 
to be held in Washington, D. C., featuring high level dis- 
cussions by various national YIP leaders, 

(5) July 4, 1972 - "Third Annual Reefer 
Smoke-In" at the Washington Monument with an "Anti- 
CIA-Heroin" march to the steps of the United States 
Capitol. 


(6) July 27, 1972 - "National Che Gueverra 
Appreciation Day," to be held at Miami Beach, Florida, 
to show solidarity with Cuban stamggle for liberation. 

(7) July 27-31, 1972 - "Zippie Party Freek 
Circus," at Miami, Florida, which is to be a four-day 
party featuring an assembly of young voters called 
together to show politicians that unless the demands 
of youth are met, the 1972 Presidential Election will 
be boycotted. 

(8) August 1-20, 1972 - "Grapes of Wrath 
Caravan" to San Diego, California. 

(9) August 21-24, 1972 - "Smoke Grass and 
Kick Ass," which will be part of the San Diego action. 

Regarding the Miami protest tactics, the 
release said YIP representatives from each state will 
bring a "rock" to the city. Two "rocks" are then to 
be chosen to represent the "ZIP-YIP" national slate 
for presidential office, YIPS will then be urged to 
"Cast Your Vote for a Rock in 1972," and to "make 1972 
one big rock festival" and catapult our rock into the 
White House." 



I 



YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY 
"PRE-CONFERENCE" 

JAmTARV 7-9 5 1972 
MADISON, WISCONSIN 


Emphasis was placed on the fact that Jerry 
Rubin and Abbott Hoffman, individuals who have pre- 
viously exercised considerable leadership effect in 
YIP matters, have, by their own recent discriminative 
elitist activities, removed themselves from YIP mem- 
bership. The Madison YIP Conference, according to the 
release, is an event to reorganize the YIP and give 
this party new dynamic leadership for 1972. 

The release ended by saying that YIPs are 
urging acceptance of the following program for 1972: 

"Unconditional Surrender of United States 
Government" 

"U.S. Out of America Now" 

Source stated that although the release mentioned 
San Diego, the entire "Pre-Conference" at Madison concerned 
tactics planning the Miami action. 

Source advised that following the press conference 
the remaining conference attendees left Madison to return 
home . 

"The Capital Times," a Madison daily newspaper, 
in its issue dated January 10, 1972, carried an article 
captioned, "Yippies Huddle Here--Have Plans for National 
Convention Circuses." 

This article, in part, advised as follows: ■ 

It was noted at the press release given by 
YIPs in the State Capitol Building on January 10, 1972, 



13 


i. 



YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY 
"PRE-CONFERENCE" 

JANUARY 7-9, 1972 
liADISON, WISCONSIN 


that YIP plans a non-violent counter-convention to 
be held in Miami at the same time as the Democratic 
National Convention. 

The spokesman who issued the release said, 

"In Chicago in 1968, we exposed the Government; in 
Miami in 1972, we will expose ourselves and our alter- 
native culture." The spokesman also said YIP hopes 
to "expose the positive aspects of what we're doing 
rather than the negative aspects of what they (Demo- 
cratic and Government officials) are doing." 

The spokesman also stated, "Hippies are 
gone and Yippies are passe. So we're calling our- 
selves Zippies because we've got lots of zip." 

One YIP Conference delegate, according to 
the article, advised, after the Conference, that his 
movement has been quiet too long. He said the Madison _ 
Conference was decided, in part, to "get at moving again. 

Second source advised on January 13, 1972, 
that the official Conference attendees made up a list 
showing their names and addresses and causes which they 
represented. This list will be used as a ready-reference 
by the attendees for the purpose of communicating with 
one another and to insure that their organizing efforts 
for the Miami action are progressing satisfactorily. 

The attendees hope to be a driving force behind a 
successful Miami turn-out. 

The list reads as follows: 



14 


CONFIDENTIAL 


YOUTH international’ PARTY 
"PRE-CONFERENCE” 

JANuAkY 7-9, 1972 
MADISON, WISCONSIN 


Name and Cause Espoused 
Virginia Check - SEED 


} SEED/YIP 


Panhandlers Liberation Front 

Rimning Deer (in care of 

- Insane Liberation 


Front 


• Chicago 

Zapata Collective 


Press Syndicate 


J- Underground 


"Take Over" 


YIP/ 
- YIP 


Columbus 


- YIP - 


Yippie 

Yippie - YIP 


- Columbus 



Address 


1 








CONF^ENTIAL 


YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY 
"PRE-CONFERENCE" 

JANUARY 7-9. 1972 
MADISON, WISCONSIN 


Name and Cause Espoused Address 


- YIP - Sunshine 
Aura iAiDiications 



- VOLVOX/YIP 


Madison 


- Operation Snow 




- Chicago 


- Chicago 


- VOLVOX/YIP 


"Snake Ranch News" - Dope 
Smokers Unlimited 




>? 

I 



;ntial 


be 

Address tec 


Box 26 

Village Station 
New York, New York 
Telephone - 212-242-3888 





/^'h 

Mslit (hBHIs -si-Vf^T 




DICLASSIFICATIOII AUTHORITY , DERIVED FROM 
FBI AUT OHAT 1 0^1 C LAS S I F I CAT I GH GUIDE 
DATE 02”06”2oHf 


UJSfITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 


FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 


In Reply, Please Refer to 
File No. 


Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
January 14, 1972 


i a 1 


WAR TAX RESISTAKCS; 
WAR RESISTERS LEAGUE 


First source, who has provided relialile iniormat loa in 




I announced on January 

1972, that the War Tax Resistance would sponsor a National Tax 
Resisters Conference in Milwaukee on January 7~9, 1972, 


Ls described 


^DENTIAL 


Excluded f;?d&sautoiiiat ic 
d ov^n^i?ad in g 
de<uassif icat ibsi 


This document contains neither recommendations nor conclusions 
of the FBIo It is the property of the FBI and is loaned to 
your agency 5 it and its contents are not to be distributed 
outside your agency. 


SEARCHED_^lJNDKe^^^._ 
LiERIALIZEE^S^ 




i 




Y/AR TAX RESISTANCE; 
WAR RESISTERS LEAGUE 



YYisconsin, January 7-9, 1872, as follows: 




WAR TAX RESISTANCE; 
WAR RESISTERS LEAGUE 


CONFRtoTIAL 

FRIDAY: ' 

3;00 i-egistration and housing assignment 
6:30 supper (v/ill also be available for those who 
come later) 

8:00 Meeting of the Masses 
Introductions 

Announcements concerning housekeeping 
Discussion of why people came; what they want out 
of the conference; if proposed agenda meets needs 

Decide on agenda , 

later — socializing and small group discussions as desired 

SATURDAY: 

9:30 breakfast 

10:30 workshop 

1:00 lunch 

2:00 workshop 

4:00 workshop 

6:30 supper 

evening socializing 

10:30 informal folk music concert 

All workshops offered at each time. Try to 
keep limited to 12 people. Each workshop to 
jot down recommendations on a mimeo stencil 
provided , 

■ National Staff Outreach workshop: 

coordination of centers, use of national 
office and Tax Talk, eta, patterning after 
IRS regions, relations with national 
coalitions 

Tax Counseling training and outreach 
Alternate Funds 

Tax structure analysis and education 
Insulating property; corporate property; 
life centers 

Strategy at large and for April 15 



I 


WAR TAX RESISTANCE; 
WAR RESISTERS X;EAGTJE 


SUNDAY: 


CQNF^EHTIAL 


9:30 breakfast 

10:30 Meeting for the Masses 

Response to workshop recommendations 

Make any necessary group decisions 

Evaluation 

Announcements concerning rides and housekeeping 
12:30 lunch 

A third source, who has provided reliable information 
in the past, advised on January 4, 1972, that the meeting 
scheduled to take place at the First Baptist Church, 911/. 

Ogden Street, on January 9, 1972, had been chanpd to take 
place at the Jewish Community Center, 1400 North Prospect 
Avenue , Milwaukee . 

First source advised that the National Conference of 
the War Tax Resistance and the War Resisters League commenced 
at approximately 7:30 p.m. , January 7, 1972, at the First 
Baptist Church, 911 E. Ogden Street, Milwaukee. 

36 individuals were in attendance, which included representatives 
from the following areas: 

New York City, New York 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Kansas City, Missouri 
Chicago, , Illinois 
Syracuse, New York 
. Milwaukee, Wisconsin 


advised that 
follows : 


ivised tha1 


jassed out a lea] 


from 
Source 
read as 


CONFIDWIAL 


)Ris.TORIUI-l OH WAR T/iXES - 1972 


co^4de 


ential 


/ \ 

Nixon v?ould have us think 


Is the war in Indochina winding dovm?? Pres, 
escalated hoohing of North Vietnam has clearly demonstrated to us that 
ernment (as many of us already knew) has been vjaging a nevf type of war 
directed by complex electronic systems* 


SOi 


The 


the American 
- an AIR WiR 


gov- 


Protest has increasingly grov/n over the past ten years to such an extent that the 
government realized it had to make a move to quiet the American people; It began with- 
dravring American troops so that fevjer American men vjould die. A new phase of the war 
began — ■ Vietnamization; Asians are being paid and armed by our go v L tu fight their 
Asian brothers and sisters; 160J00^ Americans still remain in Indochina and if ve are 
to believe our Presij about 30,000-60 >000 will remain in Indochina for some time. In 
order to show the ’’enemy" that we weren't winding dovm the war (v/hile telling us differ- 
ently) our government has stepped up the AIR ’vh’iR. Every day thousands of bombs fall on . 
the people of Indochina. Recently^ there v/as a five-day escalation of the bombings over 
North Vietnam. Pres. Nixon has made it clear that as soon as it looks as though the 
"enemy" is getting out of line the bombings will be escalated. 


V/hile the nature of the v;ar in Indochina has been changing^ there have also been 
new developments vrithin the anti-v;ar movement. Many people are convinced that more 
local actions are needed rather than putting a lot of time and money trying to organize 
a mass rally once every four to six months. Many people believe that the anti-vrar 
movement should be more decentralized. Many people believe that the anti^vrar movement 
should relate more to what caused the war in Indochina,' to what causes the Arms Racej 
to what causes the /merican government to support dictatorships (like the Pakistan gov’t, 
dictatorship ) ; and also to what causes the problems that exist in this country. 

ago 

War Tax Resistance began two years with the idea that the anti-v^ar movement must 
go beyond protest and move into non-cooperation and at the sane tine start building 
something nevf. Gradually our ranks have grown. As the moveraent has grovjn, so have v;e. 
V/e realized that we must do more than suggest that people stop paying war taxes. We 
realized that people must start using their refused taxes for local community needs. 

So we suggested that war tax refusers join together and start Alternative Funds. 

VJe.r Tax Resistance now has the organizational franevrork (over 190 ¥TR Centers) 
to grow into a mass movement. The AIR WiiR and confusion v/ithin the anti-v/ar movement 
as to vjhat tactics to take now should cause wax tax resistance to spread. However, 
how are vje going to build a real mass movement?? How do we get massive publicity and 
still be decentralized and build a movement?? 


I think we can build war tax resistance rallies all across the country on April 15th. 
Focus of these rallies should be on the AIR Vh\R and resistance - noncooperation vfith 
the death machine and most important - the use of the refused war taxes for life serving 
purposes. To build these rallies will require a lot of hard work in the next few 
months. This work should begin immediately all across the country wath: meetings, 
literature tables, street theatre, interviews, vigils, information tables at IRS, press 
conferences, etc. These small o,ctions should be leading towards bigger actions on 
April 15 th, People who are already resisting could come forward at press conferences 
or other public actions and call on their fellow citizens to join them. Alternative 
Funds could be started. Every organization vrhich is involved in the movement for 
social change should be strongly encouraged to join this campaign and to participate 
actively in it. The Catholic Peace Fellovfship jaas already joined WTR in this campaign, 

OTIAL 



MCRATORIUI'I ON NiiR T.'iXES 


— [Pago'Tvfo O't Two Pages] |||j 


TIAL 


The type of canpaign I an envisioning nust begin as soon as possible and continue 
throughout February and March and into April, culuinating on April 1 5 i^h la^ac ions o 
resistance all across the country. These actions aust be nore than probes vS but actions 
of resistance that show a road towards a new society. This novement, li it is grass- 
roots, will have the nonentuin (at least it should) to keep on going after Ipth. 

Dr. George V^ald said that there are now thousands resisting war taxes but if we are 
really serious about being effective we nust be hundreds and even nillions of people 
openly resisting. That neans that all of us nust work hard and convince others to 

v/ork hard. 

Besides the actions I suggested above we could also begin tours of the country. 

¥o should have two or nore people traveling by the first of February in every region o 
the country. It would be better if these people lived in the region they were traveling 
in but people fron National WTR are willing to go anyplace people feel they are needed. 
These travelers should visit every peace center they can and get conuitnents fron en 
to work on the NTR canpaign. They should help get NTR Centers started, help existing 
V/TR Centers get nore support, and help start ixlternative Funds. hey s ou c-vc o 
of literature with then. 

Advcrtisenonts should be taken out in najor newspapers and nagazines calling for 
a noratoriura of v?ar taxes in 1972. These ads could be sponsored by a* long is o 
organizations and people. ¥e could also encourage our Sponsors of NT ° ® 

in publications. ¥c should be pronoting the new ¥TR book, AIN T ^ 

MORE". ¥e should have NE\-f buttons, stickers and posters pronoting ^iPRIL 15 - MOlti.iUKl J 
ON UiJl TAXES DAY (or whatever we decide to call it). ¥e should get these out as soon 
as possible so people will be talking about it for sone tine. 

All of the things I an talking about for pronoting the canpaign will costs lots 
of noney. National V/TR already has a debt of over S6,000. ¥e need to cut this out 
couplet ely and raise lots of noney. Mayhe this could be done through concer s r„roun 
the country and other benefits for ¥TR. ¥e should raise enough noney so that we can 
help other ¥TR Centers start canpaigns in their town, cities. ¥e need to raise enough 
noney so that we can print thousands of leaflets and other pronotions such as .e ^ ^ 

buttons, stickers and posters I nention above. VJe need brains torning how we are going 
to raise this noney. 

I hn,ve written this ???? (whatever* you want to call it) to give sone direction to 
the conference this weekend. I hope that when we leave this weekend we will all be 
going ba,ck to our connunities ready to vfork. Hopefully, this docunent you have jus 
finished reading will help. 





WAR TAX RESISTANCE; 
WAR RESISTERS LEAGUE 


Second source advised that this meeting began with 
a dinner and was followed by short organizational meetings 
to discuss what would take place during the conference. 

Third source advised that the main theme of Friday 
evenings events was the formulation of plans for the partici- 
pants to be able to return to local areas to establish actions 
to withhold taxes to oppose the war in Southeast Asia. Source 
advised that the Friday evening session ended at approximately 
8;45 p.ra. 

Fourth source, who has provided reliable informat ion dii 
the past, advised on January 8, 1972, that the conference re- 
convened at 10; 15 a.m. at the First Baptist Church, 911 E, 

Ogden Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Approximately 40 individuals 
were in attendance which included the following areas being 
represented ; 

New York City, New York 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Columbus, Ohio 
Chicago, Illinois 
Cleveland, Ohio 

I |'b6 

flmnno- -f-hogp. -in attendance TO ere 

I from Milwaukee , I 

lof the WTR from New York City; and| 

(acted as group di scussion leaders, as well as 

during the workshop period. 

All sources advised on January 8, 1972, that the conference 
broke into several workshop groups during the Saturday morning 
conference and the general discussion was on local organizing 
throughout the Uo S, and possible future plans of the War Tax 
Resistance were as follows; 

1, In Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, plan to disrupt 

air force bases with the disruption being attempts 
to prevent individuals from entering and leaving the 
various air force bases. 

Also, the dropping of leaflets from airplanes and 
tall buildings urging tax resistance. 


C(^pEIi™iAL 







WAR TAX RESISTANCE; 
WAR RESISTERS LEAGUE 



2. At McGuire Air Force Base in New Jersey, some 
sort of action on either April 15 or 17, 1972, 
in connection with tax resistance. 



3. Disruption of Internal Revenue Service Offices in 
Cleveland, Ohio, on April 15 or 17, 1972, 

4., During the course of the Republican Convention to 
be held in San Diego, California, during the latter 
part of summer of 1972, a setting up of a sort of 
"reserection city" based on the similar reserection 
city which was set up in Washington, D, C,, during 
the poor peoples’ march on Washington. 

5. The Harrisburg Defense Committee is attempting to set 
up marches at various cities in the immediate vicinity 
of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania,, on January 17, 1972, and 
from these cities march to Harrisburg, The partici- 
pants, while en route to Harrisburg, are to stop in 
the various towns and talk with people about resisting 
through taxes. ■ 

6. On April 22, 1972, a national action throughout the 
United States regarding tax resistance. In this 
connection, on a local level, various demonstrations 
or actions should be held on April 15 or 17, with 

respect to tax resistance. 

7. Articles should be placed in various newspapers 
throughout the Uo So, urging people to resist through 
the withholding of taxes. 

All sources reported on January 8, 1972, that brief mention was 
made concerning the WTR participation in the San Diego Republican 
C.onvention where anti-war activists and other people will be setting 
up a revolutionary city. It was pointed out that this would be a 
good opportunity to educate the masses concerning war tax resistance 
and let people know the alternatives to taxes that will be used to 
finance a war. 


It was also pointed out that the possibility exists that i' 
this same type revolutionary or resurection city would be set up I 
in Miami during the Democratic National Convention and that future 
consideration should be given to having WTR people in these \ 
revolutionary or reserection cities to try and influence the other 
anti-war groups to get behind the War Tax Resistance, 


CONiamENTIAL 


WAR TAX RESISTANCE; 
WAR RESISTERS LEAGUE 


CONFJBENTIAL 


All sources furnished the fol lov?ing inform ation con- 
cerning the f inancialreport given bv l ~l on Saturday 

-afterncon. This consisted cf the finenGi?.! repr»rt of the 
National War Tax Resistance, 1971, 


January 

INCOME 

$2,265.68 

AMOUNT PAID OUT 
$2,003.57 

262.. 11 

February 

1,152.66 

1,460.90 

-308,24 

March 

3,837.96 

3,717.18 

120.78 

April 

2,849.81 

2,519.14 

330.67 

May 

734.16 

1,053.72 

-319.56 

June 

999.53 

1,559.29 

-659.76 

July 

1,742.05 

1,719.03 

23.02 

August 

1,333.72 

1,321.90 

11.82 

September 

2,547.51 

1,653.73 

893.78 

October 

1,164.38 

2,064.61 

-900.23 

November 

1,544.19 

1,501.58 

42.61 

December 

1,563.99 

1,251.00 

312.99 


$21,535.64 

$21,822.65 

-287,01 

AMOUNT OF MONEY PRESENTLY OWED 
1, Philadelphia Resistance Print Shop 

$ 500.00 

2. Grindsi 

iiHLfi—Eress 


884.52 

3. 

(printer) 


73.55 

4. New Union Press 


638.13 

5. Miriam 

Gertler Stationery 


124.75 

6. Julian 

White Novelties 


531. 53 

7. The Nation 


98.07 


Greenleaf Books 
Nevj York Telep hone Company 
(loan) 

l_|(loan) 

Qloan) 

K loan) 

Tfor use of credit card for gas) 

I (for 1966 Volkswagen Sejuareback) 

New York City People's Life Fund 

Computer Fulfillment 

Rent 


216.00 

651.95 

175.00 

100.00 

500.00 

200.00 
210.00 

300.00 
1 , 000.00 

169.90 

230.00 


conf;h>j5otial 


(amount owed as 
of December 31, 
1971) 



WAR TAX RESISTANCE; 
WAR RESISTERS LEAGUE 


CONFIDENTIAL 


On January 8, 1972, sources furnished the following 
list of individuals in attendance at the War Tax Resistance 
and War Rsnistsrs League Conference, Wisconsin t 


CLEVELAND 



CINCINNATI 



Columbus , Ohio 


SAN ANTONIO 



NK'f YORK 



PHILADELPHIA 



DETROIT 



NEW HAVEN 



CQNFIiraNTIAL 



WAR TAX RESISTANCE; 
WAR RESISTERS LEAGUE 




MILWAUKEE 


CONFII^TIAL 



CHICAGO 



MINNEAPOLIS 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 


The following from cities unknown: 



All sources reported ■ that during the afternoon session 
held at the Baptist Church, 911 E. Ogden, some of the topics dis- 
cussed were ways to disrupt the Internal Revenue Service, one of 
these being that individuals should take money from their savings 
accounts and put it into safety deposit boxes so that when taxes 
are withheld the Internal Revenue Service can not attach your 
bank accounts and that the banks can not use the interest earned 
to help fund the United States in their possible war related 
activities. 


CO] 


iNTIAL 



WAR TAX RESISTANCE; 
WAR RESISTERS LEAGUE 



Another item to disrupt the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) 
\yas to fill out W-4 forms and claim more dependants than you 
actually have and when confronted by IRS fill out further W-4 
forms and tie them, up in a mound of paper work. 

Other proposals set forth were to set up tables in front 
of the IRS Offices and pass out War Tax Resistance literature and 
to confront employees of the IRS before, during, and after work 
and attempt to furnish them with tax resistance literature. Attempt 
to pursuade individuals to send letters to IRS stating they will 
not pay taxes unless they can be guaranteed money will not be used 
for war purposes. Will attempt to elicit support for Harrisburg 
Defense Committee, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, through organized 
marches to Harrisburg from nearby cities. During marches stops 
will be made en route to Harrisburg Police Department and speeches 
given concerning VfTR movement. 

Attempt to establish action at main post offices in major 
cities throughout the United States at the time of deadline for 
filing income taxes. Advise individuals to refuse to pay their 
telephone bills which the Government uses to support the war. 

Sources also advised on January 8, 1972, that the evening 
session of Saturday’s conference consisted of an informal folk 
concert which ended at approximately 10;30 p.m, 

Eourth source advised on January 9, 1972, that the 
War Tax Resistance (WTR) and War Resisters League (WRL) National 
Conference reconvened at approximately 10:30 a.m. at the Jewish 
Community Center, 1400 North Prospect, Milwaukee, Vfisconsin, with 
approximately 28 individuals in attendance. 

Source advised that a breakfast was held prior to this 
meeting at the Jewish Community Center from 9;30 until 10;30, 

First soui'ce advised that from 10:30 to 12:30, short 
workshops were held to make recommendations and evaluations con- 
cerning what was discussed during Saturday’s workshops. Source 
advised that the main theme of the conference was to organize at 
your own local level and that participants should return to their 
local areas in an effort to organize demonstrations at the Internal 
Revenue Centers and major cities on either April 15 or 17, 1972, 
and that. when the date is finalized the day should be known as 
”R-Day,” for resist, refuse and reform. 


CONFIl 

1 


S’TIAL 


WAR TAX RESISTANCE; 
WAR RESISTERS LEAGUE 




Second source advised on January 9, 1972, that participants 
again indicated efforts should be made to establish a ’’revolutionary 
city” at the Republican National Convention, San Diego, California, 
along the same lihcs as rcsnrection city v)hich established in 

Washington, D« C« during the poor peoples’ march on V/ashington, 


Third source advised on January 9, 1972, that participants 
indicated efforts would be made to centralize the tax resisters 
movement by taking control from the local level in order to 
establish and organize more national actions on the local level. 

Third source further indicated that attempts would be 
made to establish pickets at the H & R Block Companies throughout 
the major U,S, cities as H & R Block Company prepares tax returns 
for millions of Americans. 


First source advised that in conclusion, 

stated that the War Tax Resistance organization was approximately 
$6,000 in debt and efforts will be made in the near future to 
collect pled ges from members throughout the c ountry. Source 
advised that meeting on 

Sunday, and he stated in closing that a detailed mailing list of 
all in attendance would be furnished in the near future and that 
this mailing list should be used to keep in better touch and to 
coordinate WTR activities for April of 1972. 



CONK^NTIAL 





ALL I1JF0MIU3,01 COlfTMlED 
DATE 02^16^2012 BTrafcBC' ' 


LUHlAIMtl) 

B Yllilt''' i « UC/LP/|^n-I 


Tiansmit the following in 


AIRTEL 


Dale: 1/14/72 


(Type in plaintext or code) 

AIRKIA Ilr^REGISTERED 

(Priority) 




TO: DIRECTOR, FBI 

FROM: SAC, MILYIAUKEE 

SUBJECT: 7?AR TAX RESISTANCE (WTR) b7c 

IS - NEl'f LEI‘T \ 

MI 100-17459 \ 

^ — \ BUFTLE 100-457215 

/ WAR RESISTERS LEAGUE /(wRL) A] jT ] / 

X IS - NEW LEFT / I \ X ^ J\{ J ^ ^ ^ 

/ MI ioo-15195 f rf ^ ^ 

BtrFILE 97-3 V (/ 

^ 00: NEIV YORK . 

Re MiTsaukee teletypes to Bureau dated 1/3/72, 1/6/72, 1/8/72, 
and"l/b/72. 

Enclosed for the Bureau are 15 cop5.es and for all other off5.ces 
copies as designated of an LHM dated and captioned as above. 

Enclosed LHM 5.s classified '’Confidential’’ as it coni.ains^ 
inf onaat 5-on furnished by confidential sources of continuing 
value, the identification of v^hom could coBipromi.se them ths:.'re.j5 
possibly having an adverse sftfect. upon the internal secuiitv 
of the United States. 

Individuals for v/hcia cha?v’actori^at ions are not set xorth^in 
LHM WQTQ checked through the Indices of the Milwaukee Office, 
This check v^as either negative regarding the individuals or 
failed to reflect suxfici-ent information regarding the.a from 
which a characterization could be con-structed , 


4- Bureau (Enc. 20) (AM-RM)^ , 

See page 2 for auxiliary 

4 -Milwaukee }rJP\' 

(2-100-17459) \ I 

(2-100-15195) \ A'l'y \J 

JEM:mhh (57) .W"^\ ' Jr, 




/ 3 r 3 -/^. 




/vpprovad; 


Sent 


SpGciai Agent sn Chevgo 


RNMENT PRINTJ/^CS OrT'CE* »9Vl— 4J3 — *35 


*MI 100-17459 
. 100-15195 

Copies Cent. 

8-Ne\9 York (Enc. 8) (RM-AM) 
(2-100-168328) (?fTR) 
(2-S7-i5) (WkL) 


5-Chicago (Enc. 5) (RM-AM) 
■ (1-WTR) 

(l-WRL) 


3-Cinc3.nnati (Enc. 3) (RM-AM) 
(1-V/TR) 


3-Cleveland (Enc. 3) (RM-^ 
(1-WTR) 

(l-WRL) 

(1-Chris Norton) 
5~Detroit (Enc. 5) (RM-AM) 
(1-WTR) 

(l-WRL) 


2-Kansas City (Enc. 2) (RM-AM) 
(1-WTR) 

(l-WRL) 

2- Miami (Enc. 2) (RM-AM) 
O^WTR) 

^WRL) 

3- Minneapol5,s (Enc. 3) (RM-AM) 
(1-WTR) 










t 



MI 100^17459 
100-15195- 

Copies Cont. 

3- Kev? Haven (Enc. 3) (RM-AM) 

(1-WTR) 

(1-WRL) 

( H 1 

2-Newark (Enc. 2) (RM-AM) 

(1-WTR) 

(1-WRL) 

4- Philadelphia (Enc, 4) (RM-AM) 

(1-Y/TR) 

(1=1ED 

(1 

(l| 

4-San Antonio (Enc, 4) (RM-AM) 

■ (1-WRL) 

(1 
(1 
(1 

2-San Diego (Enc, 2) (RM-AM) 

. (1-WTR) 

(1-WRL) 

For information of the Bureau, source advised that the conference, 
scheduled for Milisfaukee 1/7-9/72, to be held at the First Baptist 
Church, 911 East Ogden Avenue, Milwaukee, was changed at the last 
minute to include the Sunday conference to be held at the Jewish 
Community Center, 1400 block of North Prospect Avenue, Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin. 

Copies of this LHM are being furnished to San Diego Division 
and Miami Division as it was mentioned at the conference of the 
possibility of setting up a resurection type city at both San 
Diego and Miami, during the upcoming Republican and Democratic 
Presidential Conventions to be held at San Diego and Miami. 

Copies also furnished to Kansas City Division as sources in 
attendance at conference indicated that members were present 
from Kansas City; however, they were not named during conference 
as being specifically from Kansas City. 

Copies being furnished to Newark Division inasmuch as actions 

were talked about at McGuire Air Force Base covered by Newark Division 

Sources in attendance at this conference advised that a complete 
mailing list of attendees of this conference v-fould be furnished in 
the near future and that this list could be utilized for coordinating 
future actions, 

3 




cr^ tr' 



MI 100-17459 ■ 
100-15195 


Sources utilized in enclosed LHM are identified as follows 
First source 
■SecoTi'^ cjonTce 
Third source 
Fourth source 

For information of the Bureau, literature pertaining to 
conference obtained by source of the Milwaukee Division 
are attached to airtel. 

All receiving offices review enclosed LHM for individuals 
wiio may be in attendance from your Division. 



(This line for LfiFT MARGIN.) 


0-9 (Rev. 5-18-71) 


Transmit in Via . 

(Type in plaintext or code) 


Air tel 


( Priority) 




1/19/72 




I To: SAC, Albany 

Director, 




I Lrhj) j 

sP it ( ' . - ' 


FTOa: Director, FBI->. .' ’ o -h^r-r 

O tC0'ieit)iT|(,5-| t„|iP ^ ^ f T 

DEMON^AT^NS du ring th e / 1 

D^BATIC HM5®*fc,.COHV®I^ r"^ 

^ [ , (< ^ — — 2. ^AA/yr^y'''^'^ 

ReBuairtel 11/2/71, captioned ’’Demonstrations During the 
For thconin g Political Campaign - 

The Youth International Party (YIP) at a ’ J*rje JCLon f erence . ” 




7/SFfi^iW72, This activity includes a^-fNat ^bal Ch^G uevara 

Appreciation Day” on 7/27/72 and a ’’ZijipIet^SWPty Freik Circus,” on 
7/27-31/72. 0^^, ^ ^— 

(?n addition to the YIP, other protest groups may possibly 
attempt to create disturbances at the convention. 

In view of these developments, all recipients are to be 
continuously alert for plans of the YIP and other dissident groups 
regarding protest activity at the Democratic National Convention. 

All offices promptly alert sources for information 
relating to efforts by militant groups or individuals to create 
disturbances or organize demonstrations at the convention. 

Referenced air tel contains explicit instructions regarding 
handling of inforouition received. These instructions are to be 
closely followed. 

2 - All Offices 


(Do not type below this line.) 


£V'/30 '' 

I SEMICHED./)2 — INDEX^ 
*^LlZE0 FILEy 

\JAN>^ . 




Airtel to Albany 

Re: Dcsoiatratloaa Daring the Deaoeratic Rational (invention 


Where inlornation relates solely to deaonatratloiis 
at the Democratic Rational Convention, teletypes ana 
Biureaa cosmunications should carry the code word *yiBEM,*L 
letterhead Msoranda and other coaeranications whidlr'aay be 
disseminated should carry the caption, *^lemoiaitrationa During 
the .Democratic Rational Convent ton, July, 1972.” This matter 
is to be given preferred attention. 


- 2 - 



Volume II, Number 1 






I f yv 



YOUTH INTER! 



"don't take youth for granite" 

In a series of meetings in Madison, Wisconsin, 

January 7-9, the Youth International Party (better known as the 
Yippies) planned marijuana smoking demonstrations, discussed a 
forthcoming "tribal council" meeting, deliberated on activities 
targeted against the 1972 Democratic Party National Convention, 
and revealed their "candidate" for President of the United States . 
Approximately 30 Yippie regional leaders attended the sessions. 
(COI ' iriDEHTIAt:^ (u) 

Attendees set May 1, 1972, as "Joint Day," when Yippies 
will conduct demonstrations in various state capitals to protest 
state laws prohibiting the use of marijuana. (In contemporary 
slang, a marijuana cigarette is known as a "joint.") It was also 
decided that a Yippie "tribal council" would be conducted in 
Washington, D. C., July 1-4, 1972, during which a marijuana "smoke- 
in" would be held to further protest antimarijuana legislation. 
CtrOI^PIDCNTIAL) (u) 

Programs concerning demonstrations at the 1972 Democratic 
Party National Convention in Miami, Florida, were discussed. To 
kick off the action, the Yippies have designated the convention' s 
opening day (July a?; ’T,h p liupvara Dav" to display their supp ort 

oI the communist revolution in Cuba. This will be the first of a 
"fi V e - d ay s i deshow To bT known as "Zippie Party Freek Circus," an 
actxoii aime d at drawing large numbers of young people to Miami as 
a show of political strength. Yippie representatives from each 
s t a te will bring a rock to Miami, v^?nere a mock convention wili '~ 
nominate one of these stones for President of the United States. 

The 1972 Yippie nolitical slogan: "Don't take youth for granite." 

CrcinriDEi'iTiAL) (u) 



AND NEITHER IT NOR ITS CONTENTS ARE TO BE DISTRIBUTED OUTSIDE THE AGENCY TO WHICH LOANED 




V 


ITIAL 


FBI Current intelligence Analysis 

The official Yippie banner for the Miami demonstrations 
will portray a youth clenching a rock in his hand, over the caption 
"Cast Your Vote." Yippies will identify themselves by sporting 
red headbands bearing a black letter "Z" (not "Y") . It was decided 
that to "confuse the Establishment" the Yippies would refer to 
themselves as Hippies and Zippies (perhaps explaining the letter 
"Z"). (■e ONriDCNTIAL) (u) 

REMOVAL OF RUBIN AND HOFFMAN 

, The Madison conference accused Yippie leaders Jerry 
Rubin and Abbie Hoffman of "discriminative elitism," and the two 
were reported to have been stripped of their party membership. 

Since neither of these zany protest veterans was present at the 
meetings to defend himself against the charges of falling victim 
to his own publicity and of lording himself over others, their 
membership status and leadership capacities remain uncertain. 
(CONriDCNTIAL) (y) 

YOUNG SOCIALIST ALLIANCE 

NATIONAL CONVENTION HIGHLIGHTS 

The Music Hall in Houston, Texas, was the setting 
December Z8 - January 1 for the eleventh national convention of 
the Young Socialist Alliance (YSA) , youth arm of the communist 
Socialist Workers Party (SWP) (Volume I, Number 36). The 1,240 
registrants included 694 YSA members and 128 SWP members. Also 
attending were 11 guestsfrom England. Sweden, Japan, New Zealand, 
and Czechoslovakia. (TmT T^DCNTX AJLX(u) 

In the international report presented at the opening 
session of the convention, YSA announced a soon-to-be initiated 
campaign to work for the freeing of political prisoners in 
Latin American and South American countries, particularly 
Argentina. To implement this program, YSA is organizing the 
United States Latin American Justice Committee, with chapters to 
be formed in each local branch of YSA. Recruitment of new mem- 
bers for YSA will also be a goal for this committee. 

( - eONriDCHTIAL ) (u) 

Subsequent sessions revealed YSA plans concerning: 

PoUtioal Activity . The Young Socialists for 

(YSJP) will concentrate on 

gaining the college vote for S WP Presidential 
and Vice President ial nominees I I 

and by sending YSJP promotional 

teams to the Nation's campuses. 


- 2 - 


CONFJS^IAL 





FBI Current Int^ligence Analysis 

Chiaano ProbZems . YSA will intensify its 
efforts to assist Chicano students and migrant 
farm workers. The Chicanes will be encour- 
aged to discard their allegiance to the two- 
party electoral system in favor of seeking a 
political voice through the YSA and SWP . 

BlnnV YSA members were urged to 

work with the black element in prisons. 

Format i on of a Black Task Force was discussed, 
with New York City, Detroit, Chicago, and 
Los Angeles selected as target cities for a 
campaign to organize blacks along YSA 
political lines. (CONFIDENTIAL) (u) 

YSA and SWP are operating in the black, according to 
a financial report given at the convention. During the past 18 
months, the SWP fund drive raised $350,000. A goal of $100,000 
has been set by SWP for the next six months, with pledges of 
$4,000 already received. YSA announced that about half of its 
funds come from sources other than YSA members. The report 
revealed that during 1971 over $13,000 had been raised through 
fees paid to YSA speakers. College honoraria were cited as an 
important source of YSA funds. (CONFIDENTIAL) (u) 

On the final day of the convention a secret election 


was held to select the national officers of YSA. A subsequent 



(UNCLASSIFIED) 


COMMUNIST PARTY, USA 


•5 CONFERENCE RESULTS 


During December, 1971, a Communist Party, USA (CPUSA) , 
National Industrial Conference was held in Chicago, Illinois, 
with approximately 80 delegates from throughout the United States 
in attendance. The economic situation in the Nation and the 
political activities of the CPUSA were highlighted. 

(CONFIDENTIAL) (u) 

Phases I and II of the Administration's current 
economic policy were attacked, and it was reported that 
President Nixon would probably announce a Phase III, outlawing 
strikes by labor unions. This was projected as an attempt by 
the President to destroy organized labor. CPUSA members were 


CONFIb€NTIAL 



FBI Current Intelligence Analysis 


told to strive to produce work stoppages in industry as a means 
of protesting the current limitations on salary increases. 
Delegates were also urged to support the promotion of CPUSA 
rank-and-file members into union leadership positions through 
the establishment of the CPUSA-organi zed National Coordinating 
Committee for Trade Union Action and Democracy in every shop 
pnc:cih1f>. f CONPIDCNTIAL) 

CPUSA National Committee member Danny Rubin reported 
that the auto, steel, electrical, and transportation industries 
have been selected by the CPUSA as concentration points for 
recruitment for party membership. Each CPUSA district and 
industrial club was ordered to formulate plans for recruitment 
activities for 1972. f CONFIDENTIAb r ) 


OTHER DEVELOPflENTS 


THE WHOLE TRUTH? 


I [Mike Davidow, WoTLd correspond ent in 

Moscow, Soviet Union. Recently an individual close to | | 

verbally attacked Davidow for not writing the truth about 
conditions within the Soviet Union in his Daily World articles 
Bayer replied: "It is not his" (Davidow ' s) "j ob to write the 

truth--he is a propagandist." ( COMFI DENT lAIr) 














FD-350 (Rev. 7-16-63) 


( 


(Mount Clipping in Space Below) 



• iySRED BAlfiro 

. • H«rard;s)aff WmBt 
. - Significant ppliticai . re- 
forms and well-trained police 
officers should keep' July’s 
Democratic National conven- 
tion in Miami Beach smooth-, 
running and peaceful, Police 
Chief. Rocky Pomerhnch pre- 
dicted Thursday. 

Xhe beefy Beach lawman, 
speaking before the Miami 
Beach Chamber p,f (Jommerce 
at.the Delano Hotel, said he 
is Cohyinced.- .that ‘‘politicar 
violence as a tpol has kind o£ 
peaked. It’S become kind of 
counfer-produofive, to ttse- 
this year’s Washington- 
word.” 

Porrierance-, veteran of the 
trotible-free 1968 Repuhlicari' 
National ’Convention andil 
designated by Gov, Reubin 
Askew 'as. chief law enforCe- 
merit-officiai at the July 9-15 
Democrat conclave, said; 
there is little chahCeof a re- 
peat of the violence that 
marred the Democrats’ 1968 
convention in -Chicago. 

SE said., that reforms 
such as ^giving 18ryear-olds 
the tight to vote ahd; making' 
Florida. Marine Patrol ' offi-j 
the delegate aelection. ;pro- 
cess more democratic shpuld 
help calm eipotions for the 
convention. The Democi'ats 
also- are not the incunlBeiit 
party this election, and Pbm- 
erance said dissent usually is 
directed at the party in 
power. 

He said that the more than 
$500,000 in federal and local 
money being spent to train 
and equip his 250Tman force 
tfus some Metro, Miami. 
Morjda Highway 


sfi«saKo«ld. produce law offi- 
cers able to bring off "effec- 
tive and humane .policing, of 
theconvenfion;’’ 

He said each, man 'wiill re-, 
ceive 90 to 100 hours; of 
classes',', conductedby Florida 
International' Univefsi^^ to 
learn, “air altifude of psycho^ 
logical evaluation -of crowd 
' codfrol;.*’ with; about half the 
- training devoted to Behavior- 
al psychology. 

Pomerance,, who. repeated- 
ly had said delegates will be 
treated likq VIPs since* 
"theybe all VTBs,; otherwise ' 
they . wouldn’t be there,’’ 
-.called for other .police -de-. 
nartments.in. the -sM6’to join ' 

force- -in being; especially ; 
bpurteous during the coitverir 
tmn. \ ' , 


"IN THIS particular con- 
ventionj I would sayTBaP 
some youngster witlt hair- 
down to his, shoulders: andi 
barefoot may be a- -delegate)”' 
Eomerancesaid, 

‘T would hate for our offi- 
cers to -look at every'youiig- 
ster in..sandais' and' long, hair 
md see -a potential bomb 
thrower.’” 


Pomeranceisaid; that Some 
of the, sophisticated. Cpmrau- 
hications and survelilance 
equipmqnf to, 'Be purchased- 
with thte' convention grant 
will be used to watch people 
from a distance and avoid 
.any unnecessary personal .in- 

cqnvenience'in.Screehing.p'er- 

,'sons. enteririg'.the' Convention 
Hallarea. , ' ' 



VV' 


(Indicate page, name of 
newspaper, city and state.) 


4-C 


MIAMI HERALD 


MIAMI, EL0,^IDA 


Date: 1-21-72 

Edition: 

Author: 

Editor: 

Title: DEMOCRATIC KAT'L 
CON’t^KTION, JULY 1975 

Character: 

or /3S3-^ 

Classification: 

Submitting Office: MIAMI, FLA 

r t Being Investigated 

^ 0" /3-S~3 
SEA5?CKa_-..Jji>^., 


s^i— r..#A ] 


i— " O,--— 




FD-350 (Rev. 7-16-63) 


f 


r 


/ • 


(Mount Clipping in Space Below) 



%bonnie;granat 

Rocky Pomerancet Beach 
police chief and head of 
security for the Democratic 
Natioriai Gonventign this 
summer, told the Miami 
Beach .Chamber of Gom- 
ijierce yesterday he didn’t 
like haying to he a part of a 
politicai cohvention. 

“It’s Sad that the police 
have to have sg active a part 
iin a politicai convention’’ 
Pomerance Said. 

‘d hope that foift years- 
froin riov? plice won^t have 
to-be; so Security conscious,” 
headded. 

Bubsiftce they must be, the 
Miami Beach police 
Department isspreparing for 
the cohvention like iio other 
policefoEcehas ;prepaEed)for 
anything before. 

Pattern )fpr preparation is, 
the mefihod, the department 
used in: 1968 Repubiicaii 
Natighat Convention held: in 
iMiaini Beach.; 

Police met with dissident 
groUpshefore the cOnventign 
and planned security 
precautions carefully. 

This time, however; Miami 
Beach;haS additionai help in 
theifor m-pf a- federal grant tp 
|heip give ■.pOlioe'the' training; 
I heeded for preparation for 
I the convention. 

Almost $400;0'00 was 



with potential disorder 
without confrontation. 

‘"The-mere fact.that.pohca 
activity and' security 
. arrangements are such a 
(finntiriued'On P.,3) 


RockyPomerance 


granted to the city for 
convention preparations. 

Only One per cent of the 
funds are for armaments,., 
Pomerance pointedrout. 

Members of the Beach 
pglice force aTe attending 
classes, seminars and 
workshops throughout the 
nation. 

They’re studying crowd# 
control,, the psychology of!, 
the political dissidents ahdj 
are learning ways to cope]; 


(Indicate page, name of 
newspaper, city and state.) 



JiilLY STJU REPORTER 
IIIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA 


Date: 1_21_72 

Edition: 

Author; 

Editor: 

DEMOCR-ITIC 
NATIONAL CONVENTION 

Character: 

or 


’Chief Sees 
Smooth CoMventioii 


(Continued from P. 1) 
conventions is-discouragihg 
to me,” Pomerance Said. 

“But we’II, be ready, and- 
we’re hopeful that things go 
as Smoothly as they fid in, 
19M,” he added. 

Ponierance Said that the 
Vftai^ctor at political 


18-yearpld. vote, the non- 
incumbency of the 
Democratic party and the 
recent delegate selection 
advances within: the 

Democratic Party were 
other factors that could, help 
the(jonvention go off without 
a shag. 


Classification: SO X 3^ 3 

Submitting Office: ^ 

\ i Being Investigated 


; i- . t 




V' 


a 

’\ 



( 


I FD-350 (Rev. 7-16-63) 


(Mount Clipping in Space Beloy/) 



Rocky is pionning 


smooth convesntioni 

July is a- long way off'^but I asked Rocky Pbmeraiice this 
question: What are yotir men going, to. do if 5,000. people, 
throwing, rocks and' swinging; clubs try to break up- the Demp'' 
cratlc;iJationai Convention? 

TheMiami Beachtpolice-chief took a-deep breathiandisald, 
he’d rather' take- . a positive: approach. A lot of things have 
changed since Chicago, said Poinerance:^ the Democratic: 
Par.ty has changed, the method of selecting delegates has . 
changed and there’s a wider fepresentatfoti of people' in the 
party than' ever'before. . £ 

ti InrShort,.:pomerance was trying tp say that the elemenm 
Ivhicii caused the horrendous riot at' the< Democratic Coiiven~l' 
Mohi fn- Chicago don’t exist at the moment. - • 

I said I’d buy that) but, v/hat if things change- between. . 
how and July 0th? What.if the youhg people findthemselves. a 
riew underdOg champion and sic 5,000 people oii. Convention 
Hail?' ' ' . ■ 

Well, said 'Pdtnecance, starting next month; he’s sending 
almost all of his 3(]0'-pers6n force, including civilians, to 
• schooL They’ll undergo 90'hours of physical ahd psychplogk 
cal training under the direction of Florida International Dni? . 
versity professors. So wilt key middle-management people 
from, other .police forces in Dade that are being asked to help 
in-policing the convention. 


Won’t give figute 
on troop ifrehgfb 

How many men does Rocky expect to have at the con- 
vention? He’d rather not say. “If I release a figure that sounds, 
high it will be an irritant.’’ said Pomerance- "If it . sounds too 
low, they (the would-be rioters) will say -.we can take that.’’ 
'The cldses.t Poiiierance would cbnle to committing HMselt' 
was to say that he required “several hundred” outside men to 
help:p61ice the Republican convention here in 1968. 

I'kept trying to, get back td. my hypothetical 5;000 rioters, 
bufPomerancfe kept khocking.me off balance with reasonable 
answers. He said that a poiiceman attacked would do whatev- 
er police have historically done. 

Did that mean they’ll start cracking heads with night- 
sticks? “No,” said Pomerance, “I’m not going to be drawn into 
tha t, Thf.glli use whatever defensive techniques. arfe available .! 

.. I — ..1 



(Indicate page^ name of 
newspaper, city and stote.) 


5 -A 


MIAMI NEiYS 


MIjVMI, FLORIDA 


Date: 1-25-72 

Edition: 

Author: 

Editor: 

Title: DEMOCRi\TIC 
NATIONAL COMVBITIOM 
StJiVMES 1972 

Character: 
or 

C iassi f i c o tion : 

Submitting Offlc 


80-1353 W 
flce:MIAMI, FLA. 


I I Being Investigated 


LiJ- 



( 


■ ( 


S i mp j nirfy block in the 90-hour police trainii^ rmi'r.^g. 
which is being, paid for but of a $4d0i006 federal grant, is de- 
. voted to studies of people who have used violent protest iii ' 
the past and- why. they protested. Pomerance believes that if 
police understand the people they’re dealing with- that Vio- 
lence' is iessdikaiy. 

Where •will protestors be allowed tp dembn^rate?- “Right 
in front brConvention-Halli’’ saii Pomerance, “Right next to 
the lovely hibiscus trellis.” (The flowers, however, WiU.be- en- 
twined in a chain link fence hence the use of the word 
trellis). 

Men will receive - - 

college credits 

Pomerance said;he thinks his men will be grateful for the 
f 'aining-they get, especially when itis determined that they’ll 
r iceive . college' credits for their work. 

! “We’ve handled .plenty of big conventions;” said, Ppiner- 
ance. “WMt makes this- different from the' others 'is-thepress. 
' Everyone will be^oii camera. The men learned. this-Jour years 
ago and I think they’re in the right frame of rnlnd. I’m very 
lucky, 1 have so many men who gained a lot of expertise 
working the Republicah convention, they-ll be directing- 
thingS'thistime.” , • . 

During the 1968' ReRUblipatt convention Ini Miami Beach, 
a riot.broke out in Miamils Liberty City area a riothlamed 
largely oii.4he fact that national TV cainerasrwere already on 
hand to record the scene. 1 didn’t.’ discilss.thi^ with POmer- 
ancei..however. That’s ndthisiaff air. 

■fhe Miami Beach police chief, an- amiable bear of a man, 
ishandling himself quite Well, He has made his, plans and will 
reinforce those plans with special training,- He doesn’t brag, 
about his plaris because his whole idea is. to'-biaintain- asio.w, 
profile-,. . a- difficult, taskf or amanPomerance’s size; 

Tm- happy he thinks- we won’t have trouble, r just hone 
^ 








is of the opinion there, will be people 
from the Boston area traveling to one or both of these con- 
ventions, particularly the latter and in this regard, he has 
offered his services to travel to one or both conventions in 
order to heap the Brnreaii appraised ot any plans on the- part 
of groups or individuals to disrup t e ?L ther convention, 

VThen Boston v?as advised by hilwaukee that a con- 
ference was being held in that city by the YIP, 3/7"^/72, 
Boston ifiinediately canvassed its informants, nowever, \oes 
.unable to identify any participants vrho raay have attended , 

Milvjaukee in its teletype of 1./9/72 mentioned that 
participants from Boston were in attendance, hov7ever, no 
mention is made of these individuals oy name, location or 
other identifying means. Boston is reciuesting at tnis time 
that Hilw'P.ukee, if possible, identify individuals rn atten- 
dance from the Boston area in order for Boston to cond’o.ct 
the proper and necessary . investigations on these people. 


I I ■ > 

all of whom are familiar with Mew I.^ft activity in the. Boston 
area, ' 57 ere contacted 3.s late as 1/18/72 re any individuals 
in attendance at the Milv^aukae conference who 'were from Boston, 
v?ith negative results. 


"h7n 






BS- 100 -38 3 


Boston has advised all investigative personnel 
handling Lett matters of the importance of developing 
informant coverage, particularly within extremist organizations. 
Furthermore, all Agent personnel have been instructed to im- 
raedxately furixish any information re any disruptions at 
either the Miami or San Diego conventions to the Case Agent 
handling this matter or their immediate supervisor in order 
that this informal: 5_on may be furnished’ to the Bur earn In th^=' ' 
most expeditious manner « Any such 5.nfor.aation will also be 
furnished to the Miami and San Diego Divisions. 





Routing Slip 
0-7 <Rev. 2-12-71) 

TO: SAC: 

~7~" Albany 
JTJ Albuquerque 

• Alexandria 

" ' "i Anchorage 
~3 Atlanta 
~'J2 Baltimore 
i Birmingham 
‘ : Boston 

' 1 Buffalo 
'Z2 Butte 

Charlotte 
t^nieago 
'i Cincinnati 
dl. Cie%'clancl 
«“*3 Columbia 
^ Dallas 
; Denver 
I ■ Detroit 
'“5 El Paso 
- '• Honolulu 




(Copies to Offices Checked) 


t I Houston 
[31 Indianapolis 
r~l Jackson 
r \ Jacksonville 
(31] Kansas- City 
i I Knoxville 
I \ Das Vegas 
> 1 Dittio Rock 

f I Los Angeles 
; I Louisville 
t I Memphis 

IX'i 

[“3] Milwaukee 
Minneapolis 
[31 Mobile 
f~3 Nevvatk 

N cw Haven 
[3D Nev,' Orleans 
(33 New York City 


{ } Norfolk 


1 — i Oklahoma City TO LEGAT 

[__3 Omaha [31 Beirut 

(33 Philadelphia ^3 Bsni 

[~~l Phoenix I > Bonn 

(33 Pittsburgh 313 Buenos 

f 1 Portland r'l Caracas 

{ I Richmond f3J Copenh 

f ( Sacramento [33 Hong K 

rn SL I^uis f ~| La Paz 

r I Salt I,ake City j ( London 

r~] San Antonio f i Madrid 

1 J I J 

33 San Frar).cisco f‘3 Mexico 
33 San Juan Ottawa 

33 Savannaii 33 Pans 

I — i Seattle 33 Rome 

I 1 Springfield 3~l Tel Avi 

i 1 Tfcr»pa I I Tokyo 

{ I Washington Field 
f"3 Quanlico 

/Date _a_/2.QZ'ia 


TO LEGATC'' 

3~j Beirut 

0 Bern 

1 > Bonn 

33} Buenos Aires 
33 Caracas 
f3J Copenhagen 
133 Hong Kong 
f — I La Paz 
i 1 London 
I — I Madrid 


33 Mexico City 
Ottawa 
I — 1 Pans 
3 I Rome 
33 Tel Aviv 
I I Tokyo 






HeBualrtel to all offices 1/19/72 


Retention For appiTjpriaco_ 

33 information ; j optional action > 3 Surep, by 

3J2 The enciot.ed is for your information. If used in a future ropoit, j t conceal all 
* soorces, 33 J paraphrase contents. 

33 Enclosed are corrected pages from -'eport of SA ^ 

dated 

pG.'narks; 

Dafes of Democratic National Conv<=^ntion 
7/3.0-14/7!^ not 7/27-*31/72y as stated in 
x'efe.renced aii'tel^ 2^ 3.ine 4„ Please 

correct » q 


sa?wia®, 


.BIS). 


JAN 2 r:i 97 ; 


<1 <5\ 





i 

t 

tIR DC2 DE C 0 D E 

1031 PM MITEL 01-14-72 OLB 

TO Ml AM I (SO- 135 3) 

FROM DETEOIf U 00-30025 > 2P 

MAY DAY COLLECTIVE CHDG>* 10 - MEl? LEFT 


REURAIRTEL, JANUARY ELEVE«, LAST» CAPTIOKSO DEMOCRATIC flATIOMAL 
COKVSBTIOrH MIAMI BEACH, FLA#, SUMMER, SEVEBTY-Tl®, 



PLAUS OF POSSIBLE ACTIOU DURIBO DEMOCRATIC BATIOUAL COfJVEriTIOJI, 
AUGUST, riEXT* 







PASS TWO 

HELD AT LAfJSIHG OR EAST LANSIHO^ RICH# 

FOR ItJFO, flEW YORK ADVISED JAflUARY SEVEM, LAST# 

PCPJ WILL HOLD HATIOtlAL COORDIHAtinG COMMITTEE MEETIKS 
JAMUARY tWEHTY TWO TmWTYTHREE# tJEXT# At COMHO HWEALTH 
SCHOOL, OWE FIVE OHE CO MMOO WEALTH AVE#, BOSTOM, MASS. 


E W D 


FBI m MB 
in AHD CLR 


DIRECTOE^ m 

(Attn: BOM^5?IC INTEILLIGEHGE DIVISION 

and TRAINING DIYISIOH) 

/^ SAC, HIAMZ (80-1353) 


DEJ^OCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION 
MIAMI BEACH, EIORIBA 
00LY 10-14, 1072 


IQ72 


On 1/21/72, a planning aieetlng Tfas held at 
Miami Beach Convention H^ll for the purpose of developing 
ideas for the curriculum for the training of officers 
who will be on duty during the upcoming convention* 

The following individuals were in attendance: 

ROCKt POMBRAHCE, Chief of Police, Miami Beach 
Bolice Department j 


Major^ 

Department j 

GaptainI 
Police Department 


Captain 

Miami Beach Police' 


Miami Beach Police 


(JTJ), Miami Beach 
Fo^ect Director j 


Training Officer, 


Assistant State Attorney: 


listant 



Ohio Police separtmen 


Director of Personnel, Dayton 


3 - Bureau 
(% •>* Miami 







SOI S0-t353 





Wasliiagto 
Florida j 


k, D, 

Miami, 


[ 




] Supervisor, FBI, Miami? 
Police Training Coordinator, 

Miami FBI 

TE 

i 

Training Division, FBJj 


I^^ect Director, Democratic 

national (xmvention. 


The aeetiag ms a general planning session 
mtth discussion and Ideas leading towards and 

content with the main idea in mind of trying to 
indoctrinate the officers who will attend the proposed 
training to alternate responses other than tSK? use of 
force and violence, 

ISie meeting was definitely worthwhile as a 
hasis for continued preparation of a curriculum, however, 
it appears that there is a great deal more work to he done 
before the proposed training plan will he ready to go into 
operation* 



FD-350 (Rev. 7-16-63) 


(Mount Clipping in' Space Below] 



(Indicate pa<?e, name of 
jiewspaper, city and state#} 


By LOUIS SALOME 

Miami News Poiiii«-'Wrller 

The Democratic Eart.y 
opened its national conveii- 1 
tion headquarters today in 
Miami Beach- atthe Washing- 
ton Federal Savings .arid" 
^f^ssopiation buirdifig, 
1701 Meridian Ave., and at 
the . Bermuda Apartments 
next door. 

The biiUdrngs are located, 

. behihd the cohyentiont center , 
where the Democrats will, 
nominate a presidential cam 
didate during the July 9rl4. 
convention. 

Richard Murphyj. conven- ! 
tion director, said there will ; 
be* six or , seven persons : 
Working pernianentry. from 
tlie headquarters arid that he 
will be here about three days 
, eveiyweelti 

He said headquarters will; 
move to the .Fontaineblealr 
Hotel one month before the- 
convention, but that the . 
present spape will be re-' 
.tained during thattime. 

Murphy said the planning, 

* and fihancing of this conven- 
r tion is better at this point 
I than during other Deihocrat- 
' i|,^CQnyention ih^y.,,rp.qeai: 


.full-page^fei^ 
national convention program 
i now are b e;im g sold at 
$l(>i000 each. 

George Bristol, convention 
’ ■ finance director said 60 ads- 
already have been sold and 
73 to 30 .ads are expected to/ 
be -sold. “We expect ‘to net 
,, Sl00;000 to $600;000 from it, 
if we’re luqky;” 

I .Bristol said money raised 
I from*this adveftisihg must-be 
I nsed'.fpr convention .activity, 
not to pay the party’s huge : 
deficifcor for campaigning., ' 

Murphy said -the party hi. 
tends tp pay its convention- 
bills in fulL 

A‘t previous conventions, a . 
number of people were au- 
thorized to spend money and 
debts piled up, he explaihedi 
0nly he and the convention' 
contfoller, Andrew Shea-; can 
authorize, spending for this 
convention, howeyer. 

Murphy said construction - 
plans for inside the hall are ' 
bemg made. He said all' state 
delegations will be assigned 
to hotels by Feb. 24 and con- - 

vention officers will be an- 
lipunced by Feb. 15. 

In the past, most of his 
planning was not done until 
two or three mohths before 
the convention. The faster 
pace is due to reformed party 
and, convention rules, he 
said. 

“To make it (the conven- 
tion) mgr e democraMe*tste^ 

‘ 0 n g e r and costs more : 


Murphy said be expects at . 
least 50,dp6 people -to come 
•to Miami Beach for the con-i 
vention or convention *-i-- re-: 
,'lated activities. This includes 
7, 2Q0 newsmen. 


MIAMI NEWS 


' FLORIDA 

, floor pf the convention wili ^ 

I be more restricted than be- 
fofe :fo; aybid confusion and 
^ distractions. . ‘ , I 


; 'The number of aides to, 
governors, presidential candi- 

• dates and , state party chair? 

* men also wiit be limited in 
their access to' the floor. 

He said the real- problem 
on the fidop has been' with 
the lights -and: -back-up men 
psually accompanying, teievi- . 
slon and .radio reporters, and 
; not -with newspaper report- 
‘ ers. He said the aim of the 
restrictiofis is, not to - lim i t 
coverage but to avoid .gbnfu- 
sibn. 

Each coiiventioh' session 
will run from- 7 p.rfi. to mid-, 
night. If necessary, Murphy 
, said, business wiil be con- 
■ -ducted-in- the afternoons, but 
these- .generally will be left 


Date: 1-27-72 


Title: DEMOCRATIC NATIOK 
AL CONTENTION 
SmiJJER 1972 

Character: 

or 

Classification: SO—X353 

Submitting Office: j FLA 

I 1 Being I nvestigated 




OPTICAL FORM NO. 10 

MAY 1062 EDITION 

GSA FPMR (41 CFR) |01>11.S .. 

UNITED %TAT^S GOVERNMENT 

Memorandum 


JS^IlFOBmriOH COlTMllI) 

I^piH IS iniCLASSTFIEri 
dH 02-16^2012 BY 60322 uC/LP/P- 


TO : 

SAC, 

MIAMI 

date: 1/28/72 

FROM : 

SA 



subject: 

NEW 

LEFT AND RELATED 



REVOLUTIONARY ORGANIZATIONS 
fdl-LouJflOd-' 

japbaiurfaod are observations, recommendations, 
and instructions issued as a consequence of the 
January, 1972, Miami Inspection. 


/» 



80-1353 (DNC) 
100-16028 (YIP) 
100-16495 
100-15755 
100-16201 


(SMC-MDJC) 
(PLANET) 
(EREE PRESS) 


HRA/dk 

( 8 ) 


15591 (N^ lEEt) 


b7D 



S’O- 



5010 - 105-01 



, As' you have indicated in your -STrite-ap, New Left 

/ activity in the liiani Division peaked sometine in Hay, 1970, 

/ yet the Miami area poses a potential for outbreak of serious 
/ violence under the direction of radical I'lew Left organizations 
?'• in the near, future. The target for such activity v/ould be 

your college and university campuses in the area, the siimmer . 
^Thite House at Key Biscayne, and the Democratic National 
Convention (DNC) to be held in Miami Beach in July, 1972, 

The instruments for such activity v/ould include the Student 
. HohilizatiGii Committee (SMC) at Miami-Dade Junior College, 

South Florida Peace Action Coalition, and the two underground 
publications in the Miami area. Additional stimulants could 
possibly come from developing organizations within Florida and 
alx’eady established Kev/ Left organisations outside of Florida, 
such as the Students for a Democratic Society (SBS) , the 
Weatherman organization, and the Youth International Party 
(YIPPI^). 

General Indications of stepped-up agitation on the 
campuses by Hew Left organisations have been stimulated by 
the opening of school last Fail and the estension of voting 
rights to persons aged 13. Another factor that may influence 
campus unrest is the publication of the ‘Pentagon Papers” and 
the indictments growing out of the theft of these docinuents. 
Militants and radicals will attempt to Justify their increased 
anti-v/ar activity and stepped-up violent revolutionary activity 
in the United States through these papers. 

5he Weatherman group has gone underground, and there 
are a number of Y/eatherman merabors v/ho are Bureau fugities. 
Instructions set forth in Bureau air tel to all offices, dated 
5/13/70, cautioned ”NSW LEFT HOYEHMT - VIOLEITCS, IS - 
HISCELLAHSOUS (YfSA'fHEBMAH) " and 10/1/70, and 6/15/71, cautioned 
"NSW LEFT MOVEMENT - VIGLI2ICS, IS - MISCELLAl^EOUS (EXTES-.-IIST) " 
must be closely adhered to v/ith respect to the investigation of 
organizations aiad individuals that may' bo organized within 
your division and follow the Y/eathenaan ideology. 

Bureau airtel dated 12/15/71, captioned ”2<SW LEFT 
MOVEMENT - VIOLENCE, IS - NEW LEFT", in part instructs 



~ 7 ~ 


each office of the new format for the monthly air tel 
to the Bureau which is to contain the identities and 
locations of cojamunes, total number of origin cases on 
individual extremists, informant coverage » programs 
against New Left-oriented communes and organizations, 
and local or Federal prosecutive action initiated against 
New Left extremists, A review of your files indicates 
these instructions are being complied with. A review of 
your files and communications to the Bureau in this regard 
indicates that there are no communes, organizations, or 
individuals adhering to the Weathensan or Hew Left extremist 
ideologies within your division. It is felt that the Miami 
area offea:^ a haven for the New Left extremists and in view 
of the forthcoming DNC, you should instruct all Agents to be 
alert for the formation of communes and Weatherman-oriented 
organizations and institute aggressive investigation in 
compliance with current Bureau instructions. 

New Left-oriented communes are known to be havens 
for revolutionary, violence-prone individuals, Including 
WGatherman fugitives and other New Left fugitives- Thes’efere, 
any indication that individuals are living in communal 
existence within your teixitory should be immediately 
investigated, in accordance with instructions contained in 
Bureau teletype to all offices, dated 4/17/70, and Bureau 
airtel to all offices, dated 5/13/70, both captioned 
LEFT MOVEMENT - VIOLENCE". 

In this regard, as you are aware, a series of 
demonstrations were held in April and early May, 1971, in 
Washington, D. C., which included many students and other 
individuals from ail over the country who vowed to shut down 
the Nation’s capital. Despite their lack of success, leaders 
of the Nev^ Left stated they would return to Washington, D. C., 
in the near future, with violence in mind, and plans for 
such activity were formulated and executed in the Fall of 
1971. You should stay alert to developing sources among 
activist students Vi/ho have a propensity for violence and who 
would, in all probability, participate in demonstrations 
throughout the country and specifically in the Nation’s 
capital. Such sources are vital to insure that the Miami 
Office is aware of each situation and in a position to 



advise the Bureau of extremist activities and plans before 
they actually occur. 

Concerning the Student Mobilization Committee, 
Miami-Dade Junior College, North (SMC-JIDJC) (MM 100-16495), 
your file indicates that a news article was published in 
the campus paper, dated 11/24/71, leaving the anti-war 
activists one choice - the SMC on the campus. This file 
further indicates one of the leaders in this organization 
to be a member of the Young Socialist Alliance, the youth 
organization of the Socialist Workers Party, which has been 
cited by the Attorney General pursuant to Executive Order 
10450. 


In view of this information, you should immediately 
request Bureau authority to conduct an investigation of this 
organization, in accordance with existing instructions, and 
upon receipt of such authority, you should fully develop all 
information concerning the true character of this organization, 
in accordance with Section S7B, page 12, of the Manual of 
Instructions • 

You have indicated that you have investigations 
pending concerning two New Left underground- type publications. 
These are ”The Daily Planet*^ and the ‘Tree Press”. A review 
of the file concerning these publications indicates the papers 
are being reviewed for New Left activity and copies forwarded 
to the Bureau, at their request. 

You should continue your reviev/ of these publications 
for New Left activity within your division, as well as indications 
of New Left activity elsewhere, and initiate investigation or 
inform appropriate field divisions where indicated. 

In addition to your reviev/ing these publications 
and submitting copies to the Bureau, you should intensify 
your investigation to develop information concerning the 
nature of the publications, location of publishing facilities, 
ascertain circulations, source of funds, identities of leading 
activists, connection with New Left organizations, and extent 
of domestic or foreign subversive influences ^ 

A communication suitable for dissemination, 
containing the above facts, should be submitted to the Bureau 
for each publication^ This communication should contain your 


recounaendation for further investigation as -warranted, 
pursuant to the provisions set forth in Section 87B 
of the Manual of Instructions, 

As you are aware, the underground press are the 
propaganda outlets of the New Left and frequently contain 
information regarding future plans of organizations connected 
with the movement, "While such information does not in any 
way supplant that available from live informants, it has 
provided vital information to aid in the targeting of 
developing Potential Security informants (PS Is) and sources. 

During your investigation of these two publications, 
you must be most discreet and conduct no investigation which 
would reflect adversely upon the FBI, All sources contacted 
by you should thoroughly understand that the Bureau *s interest 
is in underground publications which advocate civil dis- 
obedience, violence, or other extremist activity, and that the 
Bureau's interest does not constitute an infringement upon the 
freedom of the press. 

In your letter to the Bureau, dated 10/15/71, 
captioned ^*NSW LEFT MOVEMENT, IKTISNAL SECURITY - NSW LEFT”, 
you advised that New Left organizations within your territory 
no longer exist and that since c.ommencemenf of the Fall, 1S71, 
school term, previous groups failed to reorganize. 

In view of the former New Left activity in. yotir 
territory and in view of the forthcoming DNC and indications 
of disruptive activities during this convention, you must 
closely follow these matters and insure that cases are opened 
on new groups; Bureau authority secured to conduct investigations; 
and information developed concerning identities of members, aims 
and objectives, and activities of each organization. It is 
imperative that member-informants bs developed in any developing 
groups so that the Bureau is completely knowledgeable regarding 
their activities. 

Information has been received indicating that a 
fifth contingent of the Venceremos Brigade (VB) is being 
formulated with expected departure in February or March, 1972. 
Accordingly, you should expend every effort to identify those 
?B members within your territory to insure that investigations 
are promptly instituted regarding these individuals, in accordance 
with instructions contained in Bureau airtels to all offices 



TISimL -SEGUEITY - IJIM h 
1? two Tjending T7B cases 


I within your division* In 

handling these cases as well as future VB investigations, 
you should utilize the general guide set' forth in Bureau 
airtel to ail offices, dated 12/10/71, captioned “VENCEEEMOS 
BBIGiiDE, IHTEHNAL SECURITY - JHEW iOiS'T”, when considering 
subjects, whose aain activity has been connected with the 
?B, for the ADSX. Development of inforiaants during investi- 
gations of VB members must receive high priority. There is 
an urgent need for informants who can provide information 
regarding the VB on a national policy-making level and to 
place individuals with possible future contingents of the 
VB, 

IKF0RMA3ST PROGRAM - NEW LEFT MD 

RELATED REVOLUTIONARY ORGANIZATIONS 


The Bureau’s involvement in the security field 
is primarily that of an intelligence-gathering organisation. 

As such, it is essential that a core of (X'^ality informants 
capable of providing, in advance, pertinent timely information 
be available. Without such quality informant coverage, we 
cannot hope to fulfill our responsibities in this most vital 
area of the Bureau’s operation. 

Personnel of your office engaged in security-type 
investigations must be fully cognisant of their responsibilities 
in this regard and each must participate fully in the 
development of quality-producing informants. 

At the time of the last ir^pection, you v/ere handling 
one Security Informant (SI) and PSIs in this area of 
Hew Left investigations. At the time of this inspection, 
you continued to operate the same SI but have reduced your 
number of PSIs to one. You have one source under development 
who is furnishing information on New Left activity and 
possesses considerable potential. Your SI has been rated 
excellent and the one Bureau-approved PS I is rated good. 

It has been noted in your write-up concerning your New Left 
investigations, your SI and PSI are affording coverage of 
the organizations’ activities but are not members of the 
respective groups. In addition, you are receiving excellent 
intelligence from confidential sources reporting on New Left 
activities on various campuses,.- This indicates a need for 







the development of mote FSIs capable of becoming members 
an<fc^ reporting on the New Left movement and student agitation 

these rtnrl r>-n r^r-.l 


I You should point out to 

tne agents handling security matters the constant need for 
additional SI coverage that can provide information of an 
intelligence nature that can be disseminated to responsible 
agencies y in advance of such agitation. The acquisition 
of additional SI coverage in all phases of your security 
operations should be accented upon and stressed at ail times. 
All informants developed by your office to cope, with your 
investigative responsibilities in the security field should 
be the best available and all development should be in 
accordance with escisting Bureau policy. Special emphasis 
should be paid to the development ox Sis and I^Is who will 
be in a position to provide information concerning any 
dissident groups coming to the Miami area to encourage any 
disruptive activities during the DNC. In this regal'd, you 
should malse contacts at various hotels and motels, where 
such individuals ai*e staying while in the Miami area, who 
can help you in keeping you informed of their movements. 
Additional infoi'mants should be developed among area youth 
leaders, automobile rental agencies, and with the *’Miami 
SwitchiK)ard’% a Nev/ Left coiamunication center which is ’ 
further discussed hereinafter, to be specifically targeted 
toward the obtaining of additional information concerning 
the disruptive activities of New Left groups. 

Administrative Handling 


A review of the files maintained on your infox'mants 
and confidential sources furnishing information on New Left 
activities, indicates these sources are productive and 
producing valuable information. ■ ^ 







You should iiistruct responsible personnel to 
complete this form at the earliest possible date, ■which 
should be initialed by the Agent and supervisor upon 
its completion. 


With respect to 


you should 


complete your investigation in this matter and promptly 
request Bureau authority to designate this individual 
as an approved PS I, 


■b7D 

b7E 


Continue •to insure that justification letters 
(FD~40i), relating to informants, are submitted two weeks 
prior to the expiration date, in accordance with the Manual 
ox Instructions, Section 107, page 15. 


You should also continue to insure thai; personnel 
handling Sis reporting on Hew heft activity are complying 
with instructions contained in SAC Letter 71~9(C), dated 
5/4/71, and in Bureau letter to all offices, dated 6/30/71, 
captioned "IKFOESIAHT D^ICNATIOHS - SECUHITY OF S2SXDISNT 
AGSHCI^”, In particuiai*, background investigation such as 
addresses, etc., which would in itself tend to compromise 
an informant or source , should not be put in a communication 
unless it is a secure teletype. It is noted that prior to these 
instructions, the FD-401 j?equired that certain background 
changes be reported therein. You should instruct your 
personnel that informants and/or sources should be afforded 
a symbol number designation from the time any attempt is made 
to develop them regai’diess of status of development. The 
Bureau must be advised of the symbol number designations 
for record-keeping purposes. 


IHSTRIJCTIOKS 


Planned Activity to Disrupt the DHC, 

July, 1972, Miami Beach, Florida . 

The Miami Beach Police Department has been granted 
LEAA fiinds in excess of $400,000 in preparation of security 
responsibility surrounding the DNC scheduled to be held 
at Miami Beach, July 10-14, 1972. You are aware that the 
YIPPIES held a secret planning conference on January 7-3, 1972, 
at Madison, Wisconsin, to lay plans fox’ disruptive maneuvers 







13 - 


at the DKC in Miami Beach, You are also aware that 
infei^tioa has hsen rccoived that the Hay Day Collective 
were to meet in East Lansing, Michigan, 1/14-1-6/72, to 
draw up plans for their disruptive activities at the BMC, 

Heretofore the majority of disruptive tactics 
by the Hew Left have been directed at the national convention . 
of the political party in office at the time of that convention. 
This would, of course, refer to the Heiaublican Hationai 
Convention to be held in San Diego, California, in August, 

1972. T?hile Hew Left activists have indicated that disruptive 
activities would be held in San Diego, intelligence concerning 
these activities is in the formative stages at this time* 

Xn view of the obvious direction of radical Hew 
Left groups to move on the DHC for disruptive purposes, the 
Bureau has a paramount responsibility of obtaining, in 
advance, all plans for disi’uptive activities at either 
convention and bringing theni to the attention of Federal and 
local authorities, as well as presenting possible Federal 
criminal violations to appropriate tJ. S. Attorneys, Hie 
Bureau has advised that highlights of the plans thus far 
developed have been disseminated to The ^fliite House, the 
Yice Ihresident, the Attorney General, Secret Service, and the 
Defense Intelligence Agency. As the office covering the 
location of the DNC, it will be your responsibility to insure 
that prompt and logical investigation is conducted when 
information is received concerning planned disruptive 
activity. 


To enable your office to operate at jaaximum 
efficiency between now and the time of the DHC, you should 
immediately consider implementing the following? 







14 — 


Commence tlie preparation of photographic 
alhums containing descriptive and subversive 
charaoterissations of individuals \7ho can 
logically be expected to attend and -who are 
identified as activists in the Hew Left 
movement. Ihe use of these albums will prove 
advantageous to the Agents of your office in 
identifying individuals observed during 
surveillances as well as provide appropriate 
characterizations in submitting teletype 
summaries to the Bureau and eliminate the 
need for having auxiliary offices submit 
appropriate charac ter izat ions , 




Insure that all local law enforceiaent offices 
and military agencies have established appropriate 
channels to expeditiously handle information ^ 
furnished them by the Bureau concerning planned 
disruptive activities of Hew Left militants. 

Conversely, insure that all information 
obtained from local authorities is verified 
for authenticity prior to reporting to the 
Bureau,. In some instances, this will require ^ 
within~the-hour verification. 


You should insure that sufficient copies of 
the Bureau printed form containing the 
photographs and identities of Nsv/ Left 
fugitives are in the hands of all law 
enforcement personnel in the area. It is 
believed that this will prove beneficial to 
local law enforcement on the streets during 
the convention and will assist in identifying 
these individuals who could logically be 
expected to attend as well as agitate 
disruption during this convention.. 


Instruct major field offices having Hew Left 
activity to alert informants and instruct their 
Agent personnel to promptly report to the Bureau 
and Miami any information developed regarding A 
disruptive plans being made for the DNC or 
identities of Hew Left activists planning to 


V 



- 15 - 


ittGHd i 






Id be isstruetsd to forward 


descriptive and subversive characterizations 
to Miami for incorporation in your album. 

Instruct appropriate offices to be alert for 
quality informants who can logically attend 
any scheduled activity in Miami, who are in 
a position to furnish valuable intelligence. 
Insure that individuals recommended can C 

contribute measurably concerning intelligence r 
on disruptive activity and are not merely 
recommended for the futm-e value such attendance 
could prove to the informant in the division 
from v/hich he is sent. In considering an 
informant’s attendance at the DKC, submit 
recommendations to the Bureau and Miami for 
authorization . 


Instruct appropriate offices that while a 
majority of the Bureau's responsibility will be 
of an intelligence nature, it behooves them to 
be alert to the possibility of emerging 
criminal violations during their intelligence 
investigations concerning any support for iy 

disruption at the DNC, It is imperative where 
possible criminal violations are indicated, 
such as antiriot lav/s and civil rights violation, 
that necessary investigation be conducted to 
develop pertinent facts, to find v/itnesses 
cax5nble to testify regarding such facts, and to 
obtain pei’tinent physical evidence, such as 
tape recordings of speeches, transcripts of 
news conferences, photographs, etc. 

During the intelligence-gathering phase, Agents 
must be particularly alert for the identity of 
witnesses present during planning sessions who 
can testify regarding the details of such plans, 
overt acts, individual suspects involved, and 
pertinent specific statements made by each subject 
involved... Recording of such information should 
be handled in accordance with current Bureau 




instructions ’erhere it appears the inforiEatioii 
rgceiveci piay he used as testimony. Such 
information should he obtained in addition 
to that received from Sis of continuing value 
thereby alleviating the Bureau of the need 
to unnecessarily exposing these valuable 
sources. 

Where information is developed indicating a 
possible violation of a criminal statute, a 
separate case should be opened under the 
appropriate classification, and the Bureau 
advised immediately by teletype. 




looed by our Milwaukee (hffice during 



Your In 


to contain any information 



Inasmuch as the "Miami Switchboard" represents an ideal 
point for gathering radicals of the New Left during the DHC, 
you should immediately reopen your investigation of tliis^ 
organisation to determine its true character, source of funds, 
and connection with the New Left. Advise the Bureau of your 
findings by letterhead memorandum along with your recommendations 
regarding the possible utilisation of the "Miami Sv/itchboard” 
as a possible contact point by those New Left radicals. 

You should also institute investigation of | 

to determine his background and activity and submit tne resuxrs 
to the Bureau along with your recommsadations for further 
investigation. j37c 

You should not consider the above suggestions to be 
aH“inclusivec» As the time draws close to the convention date. 





tj 


% 


- 17 - 


additional procedures should be placed in effect to 
Icsure the E’jreau disoharges Its responsibility in this 
most important area. 

It is not intended that the Bureau is presenting 
an alarmist viewpoint concerning possible disruptions at 
the DNC. It will be your responsibility to carefully 
evaluate all intelligence developed from various offices 
throughout the country and present them to the responsible 
local agencies to enable them to handle their security 
consistent with available intelligence. In this regard, 
it is pointed out that the disruptions at the 1968 DKC 
in Chicago, Illinois, were first announced by the YIP 
organisation as a peaceful "Festival of Life” while, in 
fact, evidence was obtained from Bureau offices throughout 
the country indicating many of the demonstrators came to 
Chicago with only one thing in mind ~~ violent confrontation. 

Genex^X Instructions 

While there is little reported New Left activity 
within your d.ivision at the yiresent time, Agents working 
security matters in your office raust be insti’ucted that the 
Bureau must be immediately advised of any outbreak of 
demonstrations or proposed demonstrations within your 
division. In this regal’d, you should make, certain that all 
employees of your office are aware that such activities 
which transpire during late evening are brought to the 
attention of the Bureau prior to the opening of business 
at the .Seat of Government the following morning. This 
is e:-ctremely important as Hie vrnite House, the Attorney 
General, and interested Government agencies rely heavily / 
upon the Bureau to keep them apprised of ail es;treniist / 
and radical New Left activities throughout the United / 
States , — y 




«• • 





TELETYPE 



1-25-72 

COBEB 

KITEL 



BISECTOR j FBI (XOO-459711) 

ATTmiOHs ■ DOMESTIC HiTELLXGEHCE DIVISION 

BeSTOH 


FROM? MimUKES <100-17742) (P) 


y 


/ ' ' 


/C^ 


> 






^®-^ls_c^i^TxoH_j:Qs_PEAcx./jm_jssn.GE_^ j ^ " 

IS - OT 'left PJ Qt/Q'j ^ f 

FIRST AMS SECOND SOURCES ^ 1^0 HAVE PROVIDED RELIABLE 




< 



SOimCSS FURTHER ADVISED PARTICIPAJTTS DISCUSSED 
POSSIBILITY OF SPOHSORING MASSIVE DEldONSTRATIOM DURING 
PBESIDENT NIXON'S PLANNED TRIP TO PEKING DURING vMICH 
TIME THEIR THEME WOULD BE, ” GO TO PARIS" INDICATING EFFORTS 
SHOUID BE MADE TO OBTAIN AN END TO, SOUTHEAST ASIA WAR IN 
PARIS RATtlER THAN POLITICAL ATTEt'IPTS IN VISITING PEKING 
AND MOSCOW. 



IT WAS INDICATED EFFORTS SHOULD BE MADE ON BEHALF OF 
DEMOCP.ATIG PARTY BY PGPJ IN HOPE, AT TSffi OF COtJVENTION, 

PGFJ WOULD BE INVITED TO SEND DELEGATES TO ATTSJ® COIWENriON 
AT ICEAJIIL 


- •' x' 





m 100-17742 

PAGE THESE 

SOOECES ABVISED PMTICmStS AT llEETING EHDOESED 
LOCAL AHI> BEGIONAL DMOHSTEATIOMS OH APRIL FIFTEEN ON 
BEHALF OF TAX SESISTENGE M0VS^S1'0!S AIONG WITH Alf^' ACTIONS 

UNDERTAKEN BY Tm NATIONAL HELFAIE SIGHTS ORGANIZATION 
<m^RO)<, 





a 100-17742 

PAGE FOUR 

SOURCES ADVISED APPROXBIATELY SIXTY INDIVIDUALS 
ATTENDED CONFERENCE ON JANUARY TNStlTYriilRD, SEVENTYII^O. 
ADMENISTRATIYE 

RE BOSTON TEL TO BUREAU > JANUARY *n®NTYrHIRD, 
SOURCES UTILIZED IN inSTpm TEL ARE | 


FOR INFOSl'lATXON OF BUREAU SOU?vCES ADVISE 


AIR !-!AIL COPIES FURNISHED SAM DIEGO AND MAHI XNASl-SUCH 
AS FORTHCOMING COrWStmONS THOSE CITIE^^l^'^ONED DURING 

r - . . , 

CONFERENCE. 

MILWAUKEE CURRENTLY PREPARING LHM L^ICH WILL BE 
FORNASBED BUREAU AND INTERESTED OFFICES . 




F B I 


-■J 6 (Flev, 5 - 22 , 04 ) 


Transmit the fcilowing 

AIRTEL 


2/1/72 

(Type in plaintext or code) 

AIRMAI J,, - REGISTERED 

(Priority) 


FHOIh 


DIRECTOR, FBI (100-^43910) 

SAC, SM DIEGO (100-16200-Sub 10) (P) 


CALREP 

YOUTH lifTERI'IATIOHAL PiiRTY (YIP) 
IS - YIP V-LJ-r; 




''Derflonstratiou^DurTn^^'+^ 11 / 2/71 captioned 

to gS Political Cen-ipaign," 

<3ated"i/t577l JaSoAd 

xoui.,n J-ntea?na(.j.orjal Party, IS - vip 11 and unT.rpi,i-fl- 

Internationp?^® V9/72 captioned ''Youth 

inueina-cional Party, Pre-Conferenco, IS - YIP." 

(Yin) Youth International Partj*’ 

io;:-o p pjoacatcid it is planning to particinate jn the ^ 
19/2 Republican Convention at San Diego, Callfg^nla S 

4 - Bureau 

(2 - 100-467491) 

Chicago (100-^4975) 

Miami (100-16028) 


Miami (100-16028) 

Boston 

Mil-f-raukee 

Meu York (100-162260) 
Springfield 
WO (100-48395) 

San 'Diego 

(1 -'100-15393) (YIP) 


RSB : j am 
(21)'^ 


SEARCHED^.- 

SERIALIZES^ 


hjieElEO.., 

...FILED..,,,.-. 


Appiovod: 


Specjnl Age fit in Op.jrg.T 


i-i I . V. 


ffNir G or ncr; ta/i- 


^■c (■ 


SD 100-1 6200-Sub 10 


(develop _eiiecti\^e covorage of militant individuals 
might come to the convention, efforts 
shouio. be inruiated bv receivinr off-: cpc; to 

vmo vn.xi be able to travel to San Diego. " 

The^Burea.u ha.s instructed tha.t recoiimendations 

attendance at the convention should be 
q^hniii '■h*' Bureau and Sail Diego. Specific comments 

Should be made concerning each infornant's position in the 
organization or hew Left Ilovement, code name, mode of travel, 

es'^-i^-ited expenses. Also include 
number of individuals, including 
^ ele^.. i,e.>, v,ho will aioend convenuion from informant's 

Kecon.nandations should be submitted as soon 
as possible in order for the Bureau to evaluate each 
recommendation. 

ct-, prior to the convention, San Diego vrill 

fuinioh the Bureau and. receiving offices the contact 
telephone numoer and the name of the SDeclal Agent to be 
contacted by informants during convention. 


2 


_FD-3S0 (Rev. 7-16-63) 


(Mount Clipping In Spoce~Below) 


invention Bremm 

NAA€P' Woirmm 


(Indicate page, name of 
newspaper, city and state.) 


By The Assoclaled-PrsH 

. A Florida NAACP leader 
Monday sent a telegram to 
Democratic National Ghair- 
man Lawrence O’Brien warn- 
ing of a ’eiiicago.-like' situa- 
tion' at; the party’s, July con- 
vention nnless Democrats 
forccMiami Beach hotel and 
mo.teliownefs tb.hire blacks. 

Marvin Davies predicted; 
.thaf$566'iOOO being- spent to 
prepare -the city's police 
force for the convention-will 
not do “one; damn 'bit of 
good’’- nnless more blacks 
wereMred. 

: He;said .the work force in 
the city’s tourist industry 
should;b> 1$ pen pent black 
before the convention con- 
venes otherwise “1 can see 
another situation like Ghica- 
go.” 

. DAVIES, field, secretary of 
the Florida National- Associav 
tion for the Advancement of 
Golored Feople, called for 
spending another $500,000' 
on “hiring minority employes 
. . .notjustCJubans’’ whobe 
charged w ere shutting blacks 
odt of aTOilable jobs. 


“Em saying, -for the,- cause 
of peace they better hire 
some minorities and not just 
Cubans,” hendded. 

But Edwin Dean, executive 
director of the Southern Flor- 
ida 'Hotel and Motel Associa- 
tion, said the problem was 
that blacks didn’t want to- 
■work'on 'MiamiBeach. - 

“BLACIiS are fairly fully 
empioyed,” said Dean.. ‘We 
have worked with the Urban 
League to try and hire more 
blackS-.but tile fact isfew are 
available for employment in 
■hotels, 

'We would welcome any 
assistance the NAACP could 
give ug in recruitment of. 
blacks,”' Dean said. 

Davies said he would ask 
all the Democratic presiden- 
tiat candidates tp support the- 
demands he made in Ws tele- 
gramfo- O'Brien. 

“Lawrence O'Brien must 
use- his leverage to improve 
minority employment or the 
$500;000 they spend to beef i 
up the Miami- Beach police; 
force is not going to dp one 
damnbit ofgood,”’HS?SaiOf“ 


IIAMI HERALD 


IIAMI, FLORIDA 


2/1/72 


democratic 

NATIONAL CONVENTION 

Character; 

or 

Class! flcatlon ; 80-1353 

Submitting Office: MIAMI, FLA. 

I I Being Investigated 





(Indicate page, name of 
newspaper, city and state.) 


6-A 


MIAMI NEWS 


MIAMI . FLORIDA 


Date: 2/1/72 

Edition: 

Author: 

Editor: 

Title: DEM0CRAT.1C 
NATIONAL CONVENTION 

Character: 

or 

Classification; 80-1353 I 

Submitting Office : MIAMI, FLA. : 

Being Investigated 



( 


r 


. the As sociated Press 

Tallahassee — F i'dri&a. 
Gov. Reubin- Askew probaljly 
wilt emphasize the need for 
national' unity rather than 
maKe a wuer partisan atcacK 
on the NiiSn administration- 
when' he gives the keynote 
address at the 1972 Demo- 
cratic National Convention 
nextJuly. 

Askew’s selection as key- 
note speaker was announced 
in Washington yesterday by 
■pemocratic Party chairman 
Lawrence O’Brien. The con-, 
vention is scheduied to open 
Juiy 9 in Miami Beach. 

Askew has .never spouted a 
strident party line;. .In hiS 
1970 campaign against Re^ 
puBlican Gov. Claude Kirk, 
tile dark-iiorse, 43iy ear-old 
.Candidate ftoni Pensacola 
won, by discussing tax reform' 

. issues father than by making 
pefsonal attacte. 

I ■ 

'' 'In announcing thd choice, 
G^Brien said Aske'W “typifies 
Ithediigh- quality of Pernocrat- 
ic governors’’ across the na- 
tion.. 

“in his keynote address, he 
will be setting the scene for 
the most opeii and- democrat- 
ic poiiticaLconventiop in his- 
tory,’’ O’Brien asserted. 

Askew’s ■ press seefetary 
Don Pride, said that when 
the governor was informed 
of'Hi's selectionphe-expressed 
pleasure and said .he “feels It 
lis an hpnof for himself apd 
^ for Elofida to be assigned 
, this j:ole- after only one year 
in office,” 

\ 

J . lleceh tly, the majtaluiiljsd 
^y^some Democratic presi- 


dential h opefuls as one.of the , 

“ "new tSfeed” of Dixie leader^* 
spoke at a “New South” 
symposiumlh Tampa. 

In that speech, he urged 
souinerii poiiucians lu stop 
playing on the fears and prej- 
udices of their constituents. 
Instead, he said, they shoilld 
help them overcome those 
feelings. 

In one of hiS bestTkno'Wh 
speeches, he discussed the 
.busing, of school pupils to 
■\ achieve racial desegregation 
i Askew said the way to- en| I • 

Busing was to bring a^u| 

• the desegregation of iieigh*^' 
.borhoodsiahd end ‘'cbmiuuhi'' 
ty apartheid/’ 

Every major Dehiocratic 
presidential hopeful except • 
Alabama Gov:. .George WaD 
iape has praised the speech., 

: EroritfUhhihg, Sen. Edmund • 
Muskie of Maine even wrote ' 
dor a copy of .it. And lastErir 
day night in Ocala, Sen. Ed- j 
j ^ a r d Kennedy (D.-Mass.), ' ■ 
(uoted extensively from' it ' ; 
irid said senators who will, , | 
soon vote in Washington on-: 


'desegregation issulT should 
take'heed of its content. 

Askew got -the fifbt inkling 
that he might be selected as 
keyhpter.last week wheii he 
received a telephone call 
from Robert StrausS, Demo- 
cratic.Patty treasurer. 

• Strauss once remarked to 
Askew aides that He viewed 
the.wavyihaired governor as 
“aman- of destiny.” 

Askew received confirma- . 
tipn of his selection last 
night as he conferred with 
aides over the final draft of 
an address to be made today 
when the 1972 legislative, 
session convenes here. 

Speculation that the teato- 
taling former state senator 
would be selected as a vice 
presidential riinningrftiate 
immediately ran wi|d in the 
state capital when, the choice . 
became-'koowh; 

Askew has endPfsed no 
one fpr the.Dernpc^atic ipfesir 
dentiai nonimationi hut It ; 
had been expected he -would ■ 
do. so, after Florida’s second- 
ih-the-natipn'.presidential pri, ; 
mafyiMarch. 14.. 

ildweverv informed, sources i. 
saidlast night that Askew’S .■ 
•selection as keyhote.r mean's; ■ 
he WilLnot take sides .prior to 
the July 9,-.13>convenfi6n, ‘ 

Askew’s selection as. Key- : 
hgter also saves :iKim from-;! 
one- possible embarrassment ■ 

• that he would he a dele- ; 
gate pledged to Wallace. ’ 
Wallace •curfentty is running 
ahead of other bemperats in ' 
the hot Florida primary cam- 
pai^. AS an at-large dele- 
gate, Askew- would have 
been .pledged tovbte for the 
winner of the primary oi the 
first'baliot. 

But now, as keynoteri 
chances are Askew will not 
be a,delegate. 

In recent speeches before 
■Democratic fund-raising din- 
ners In Miami and Jackson- 
ville, Askew has stressed' na- 
tional unity as a higher goal 
than Democratic party unify. 

Aidbs said that in his key- 
note address Askew could be 
expected , to empha'size the 
positive aspects of the camr 
paign rather than rpount an 
a ttack on the Nixon a dminis- 
'Etottdnr*' 


FD-3S0 (Rev. 7-16-63) 


(Mount Clipping in Space Below) 


THE FROiST PAGE 


BjrJPHNPlINJilEKA^ 

■PL'OHlDA has hot heeii in the 
spotlight" of a riatiqnatBemocfatii: p6-. 
^ lifical; convention, "such as is shaping 
up for &IiamiBeach, for 12 years. 

That- earlier one 
was in Eos Angeles, 
yet Floriaa was in 
the- center of the 'ac- 
tion right thifough ■ 
the- cl^n sweep 
norilination of John 
E.. Kennedy and his 
acceptance of Eyh- 
don 'B, Johnson as 
his running mate. 

Johnson had; _ . , 

cometo the conven- Pennekamp 

tioil- seeking the Presidehtialhomina- 
tion. Florida had k favorite son 
former Sen." (jeprge 'Smathers. The 
state’s, governor, EdRoy Collihsi was 
the convention’s pemvanent ohair- 
■ihari. ■ ■ ■ • . - ^ 

interest was added to the Com- 
plexities by the fact that' Sihathffis 
was a close friehd and prote|e of hiS- 
ipentor; Johnson, aiid was Regarded' 
as' in an excellent trading positioh: ' 
civil fights' was to he a- major plank 
in the party’s platform and the state 
held two strongly divided viewpoints 
— both negative — hs to Paul Butl#, 
national Democratic chairman and ari 
arch-foe of Smathers. 

The dispute centered around 
whether the'sfate’s deiegation -by res- 
olution should be sharply critical of 
Butler foRprelimihary handling of the 
convehtieri, of soften M atttck oh 


CONVENTION follhwers also 


looked to Colliris as a, potential Vice 
Presidential candidate, 
sWn by'hls iteady exposure as. the 
convention's chairman and his. apf? 
ness as a speaker,.'He would make ah 
early address -to-the .convention. 

His position was’ 'ahalbgoiisj tO; 
that into which Gov. Reubin Askew 
finds himself after • selection as. the. 
keynoter .of this year’s; cpiivention, 

Both werepopular thf ougliput .the 
state and. had attracted; national at- 
tention for their performances as. 
:governor..As with= Collins,. Askew haa 
been mentioned? for -the Vice Presi- 
• dehtialiipraination. since his eiectioh, 
a. possibility that wasrenlarged when 
he- Won isubStahtial votef ;appfovai' of 
his corporate tax.esponkl. 

■ HIS' PROSPECTS could run into 
similar comprioationS'. In 1960i as 
ndwi." there .were a‘ liumBer of other 
Presidentialcandidateslookingforiah 
inipass&.BetWeph I^eniiedy "and. John- 
son that, might turn -the lightning 
.theif-Way, among them Stuart '^ym--.. 
■ington; Adlar SteVehsoh . and Mike- 
Mqnroney, ijdt unlike >the- cpnglpmer- 
ate'ih Flpfida.’s upcomingiPresidehtial 
primary. 

Ills Unlikely thaf this y?aris-cen- 
vetttidH Will .be -cehffpnted’ With the 
sleek, -prefessipnal, ■pfeiirainary plan- 
ning. displayed by the Kennedy fac- 
tidn.m I960.' - 

All pf thd alSp-rans-tP-be Held, 
hopes that Kennedy, who'Se substan- 
tial hoadstaft was conceded,, could ,be 
afhpped. When his forinlddbre numr 
her of pledged delegates made jir ap- 
parent that he Tvould be h ominated ' 
early, h strenuous hffort wasSde to 




’ delay the^ balloting overnight to . give 
; 'tES^ISeri an opportunity toJwerle«i 

! the delegates. 

that failed, and overnight came 
, the decision that Johnson would be 
, noniinatedfbr the Vice Presidency. In 
. this he was abetted by his stapnch ! 
Texas poUticai friend and political 
marshal, Sam Rayburn, House spegk- 
' er; . ' " 

JOHNSON’S- decision to accept 
the;second post •— ? which led to. his 
becoraing.BresidentW,ith the assagsl- 
ftatidnmf Kennedy — was g consider-r 
able surprise, 'as was Kennedy’s -in- 
clusiohof diimvon his’fichet' 

Johnson* whose 'Senatorial stature, 
was great,, wgs. believed, to be a No.t 
spot;man only. Nor was he highly re- 
. garded .in thd Kennedy rankSs .espe- 
cially by Ae fresident?&brother,=Rob- 
ert.F., later ‘to become U.'S. attorney 
general, the qUicklyTemedidd schism 
had -found much, of its . stimulation in 
thebaihpaign forthetop nomination. 

The' COtlilNS and Smathers 

prospectdfaded.in’the, overnight, trad- 

'■ing.. • - . : . 

>• SdidSmathersi 

“Welearned adessoh . 

■'If you went to be- President, 
dpn’.t Wait until the last minute to 
start making your bid. Eyddom John- 
son didn’t -make up- his mipd until 
about sik. weeks ago. Stuart syming-. 

ton, Stevenson- and Johnsdn. all were. 

. 'reluctant* candidates* • ■ 

‘‘Kennedy went but and fought 
farit, He won it thehardjva& Jodi 
cdirwlirfiyou figl^t-hafo^ i j 



FD-350 (Rev. 7-16-63) 


(Mount Clipping in Space Below) 


(Indicate page, name of 
newspaper, city and state.) 


17-A 

MIAMI HERAUD 
MIAMI, FLORIDA 


Date: 2/3/72 

Edition: 

Author: 

Editor: 

TitiecDEMOCRATIC 

NATIONAL CONVENTION 

Cri'aracter: 

or 

Classification: 80-1353 "33 
Submitting Office: MIAMI, FLA. 

\ I Being Investigated 



mmi 







gW|j£H 










( 


( 


/ .5j;. joh:-? r.icDEur.'iOTT 

!* H«rald Polllleatwrlttr 
rJWant to be a delegate to. 
i^e nemocratic N atlonal • cpa- 
Vfntion at MiainirBeach? 
r'Dade jDbmooratio' Chaiir-- 
jaan Ted do hen outlined- 
Wednesday the procedures 
^der •which 81 delegates 
^11 be selected to- represent 

S esState of Elorida-. 

Of those,, at least 18 Will 
?^me from the three’coii^es^ 

S inai districts aecving the 
eater'Miaini-area. . 
.IrPerSons, -wishing to- qualify 
safa candidate -for a delegate 
seatmiist fUedheit. intentions 
^foreFeb,..- ,17 with a mem- 
'Ipr of the Delegate Coprdlr 
luting Committee^ 

-' District- caucus.es will bq 
Seld-Feb, 28»or March, 25, de- 
ifending on whether iffie pres- 
idential candidate wishes, his 
*4elegates "named. Before or 
Mter’ the .March £4- prefer- 
,&ce,pr,imary-forpresident; 

‘^ Candidates fpi! delegate 
|seats, ■will be requited, to, 
ijlpecify whom -they are bac k' 

jm . , . - i -, 

1 Cohen said all .registei'|d. 


■nomnirr^tQ arp eltsible^* How-1 

ever,, to serve as a delegate| 
from a- specific congresslonal| 
district — Florida now has, 
12 districts — the individual 
must .feside in the district he 
seeksdodepresent. 

A-total of 61 delegates will 
be named;' to. represent .the 
. congressional districts. 'Rep-j 
fresentation is .based on thel 


lopulation of . the district;} 
_.mS, the' 10th distriof (North 
-Dade and Sou. A Broward) 
will have -seven delegates jand> 
three: alternates; the llth- 
(Miami BeachrHialeah) six 
delegates and four alternates;, 
and the 12th (mid^t-o wn 
Miaml-to -KerWesDfive del- 
|L egates and three- alternates., [| 
If Members of :the Democrat- 1 


Delegate Coordinating q 
lominittee include ( 16 ^ Dis- 1 
triot) G,. M. (Mack) Dai^is; 
Mrs. Ann Ml. Cramer and 
JRobert.Gu’Hisj alt ot'Broward 
' cbunty, and. Mrs. Mai (So- 
phie) Englander and Cohen^ 
for-Dade; (llth-p?stfict);Mrs. 
Englander and Cohen; (12th 
District) Haney Knightj 
,^Mrs..Mary S.'.Spottswdod?and-,n 
lEiiouch -Hi Walker, all pfH 


j(ey West; andlMrs. Eftglahii: 

er and CoHeii. 

A total of 20 delegates‘ wlL 

he selected statewide; ^th 
the- presidential candi^t® 
polling, the most votes win- 
ningtiie . group. Thdxongres- 
sionat delegates wll go to 

the candidate scormg_hignest 
in the nespeotivedlstrict. , 

Persons interested' in rtpJ 
?-ning m ay.,^ob taih a qualifying _ 

iorm .from 

jLincolh Road;, Miami Beach,, 
or by caUitt'g532i3463. 


FD-350 (Rev. 7-16-63) 


(Mount Clipping In Space Below) 


^noU)pl0W 

pn the Way 

J Warning that more .than 
10;0d0 yoiing people may be ■ 
cpmihgi a volunteer group 
^ith the unlikely naraeiOper- 
atioP Snowplow asited; for 
hplp. Wednesday in keeping 
^is July's Democratic ,Na- 
tfpnal convention peaceful. 

.a “We need to make plans. 
&efore the, convention;’* Lynn 
siavittv leader of the group, 
told members of the. Dade 
(^mraunify^llelatiohs Soard. 
vjStie said the- group — , : 
ipade: up mainly of ’ local- ; 
^uthi woinehjj members of i 
' the Gay Liberatfon Front i 
rapfesentatlyes. of. other dis- ; 
sMept .groups took the; i 
p%ie ..Operation; Snowplow’ 
“because its a nanae you. . 
wphWorgefc’* 

rMrs. Slavltt said the group 
hopes to- work with local 
^vernment and police tp 
eliminate the conditions that 
Ifd-up to -violence-at the 1968 
c|nvention-in GhicagOi 
I She saidi the young people 
I&rticularly will need soipe- 
p|ace to stay — probably 
outdoors -- food, healtkcara 
a|id possibly day-care- facili* 

irds, ' ■ 


(Indicate page, name of 
newspaper, city and state.) 


J.2.-A 


JUAMI HERALD 


JUAMI, FLORIDA 


Date: 2/3/72 

Edition: 


democratic 

NATIONAL CONVENTION 

/ 

Character: 

Classification: 8 0-13 53*^5/^ 
submitting Office: ^ FLA. 

I n Being Investigated 





FD-350 (Rev. 7-16-63) 


(Mount Clipping in Space Below) 


Demo SB 


urges 


- 5 ■- 


TO hiro^ iiiorO^ 

. . . f i *.', 

' A spokesriianfor "tlie Be'^ ‘4- ■ /3 

■ocratic llationat.CoiMmllte© 
yesterday 3«ged Mranit ,'!s 
Beach hpliel- and. hiotel o(vn^ 
e^s to eitiploy “a reasoiialie* '.1 


thd pe’taOcratte 
Conventibn-here laJuly* 

Richard Murp)ry(f^eohsen- 
tioAhiahag^ for the Bemor ^ 
cratib ■Eafty,,. said jin" Wash-' ,' "" 
ingtbii that he is ||re|iar^a>tQ 
speak personally wife- the - 
hjjtel .and inbtel; owhersr' ‘ftp: ^ * 
.make pur positibhiknowtc'’-^ 

‘T obvioiisly have lio cohf i 
ttpL over hiring: practices, at 
the motei^ ^ and E EranWy , 
rionit know what the s.iiua- ■ . 
tion is at the hotels,?’ he said.- ? 

1 

Murphy’s comihents .came t 
after a spokesman .for the 
Florida NAAGP charged: in- a 
telegram to the Deniocratic ’ j, 
hlatipnal Coihmittee that . 
Miami Beach motels arid ho,r 
tels have engaged in “racist, ^ 
Bigoted’’ hiring practices. 1' 
The telegram, Written by t 
Marvin Davies, ' field secre- n 
, tary of the Florida NAAGF, 
urged the Democratic Party t 
to support improved hiring t 
practices for minorities, be,: % 

faikih&Bemobratic National s 
Convention, convenes iCui.y:ff,. ^ y 




, ; Specifically, the telegram, ; 
addressed to Demhcratjcf Na- j 
tiorial-' Ghairinanr ’tawreiice ' 
• O’Brfehj.said; the work force 
in the hotel industry ^oiild 
he is per cent hlacic By the, 
time the Democrats, arrive. 

. Murphy said he .did . not. 
know, if Davies’ charges ate 
true, 'but he.* sai'd; he, ‘ ha$, 
talked with black community 
leaders in Miami and, they 
told him “the Ne^oes are 
notin a very goodpositionl’* ' 
On Monday, Edwin Dean, 
the executive secretary of ' 
the Southern Florida Hotef 
tnd.^Mbtel Association, is-j 
sued a strong demal of Da-i' 
vies’ allegations. . 


(Indicate page, name of 
newspaper, city and state.) 


MIAMI NEWS 


MIAMI . FLORICA 


Date: 2/2/72 

Edition: 


Title; DEM(30RATIC 
NATIONAL CONVENTION 

t 

Character: 

or 

Classification: 80-1353 
Submitting OfflceJIJAMI , FLA » 
I I Being Investigated 






f 

1 



i (Mount Clippl'ng in Space Below) 


% 


(Indicate page, name of 
newspaper, city and state.) 


5-A 

MIAMI NEWS 
MIAMI.- FLORIDA 


Date: 2/2/72^ 

Edition: 

Author; 

^Editor:. 

DEMOCRATIC 

mTioNAL convention 

/ 

' Character: 
or 

Classification: 80-1353 
Submitting Office: MIAMI, FLA, 

( I Being Investigated 


I 


RvunRERTR-STUtRERG ’ ’ would remember. ‘We figured that ‘Miami Snowgbw’ would 

^ '^Mi«niiN»wi.H»pbrttr ‘‘*‘"'''-’T?the. Sort of name thdt someone m the, i® die of Kansas 

The leader of a newly formed eoalitioh of liberal group* epuld never forget, "'she said. 

.'iWnfii .1 h nnn rtvinfacfovc n’h- ... i._ jt-jr ityrifAvMT' dMnTvi"n1attr AYnf<»tneri' 


xuc lettuci ui- a uksvyi^ AuiAijicu. ■v.wojuviwi* wi. 

in Miami predicted today that at least 10,000 protesters, ob- 
serveis^iuu uLuet ..uu-ut-lc^atCo v.'ill Visit Dade County' durir^ 
the Democratic'National Convention this summer. 

In an interview with The Miami News, Lyim Sl'avitt — 
head bf the coalition, the “Miami SnoWplow Company,” said 
it is “inconceivable to me” that the convention will not dfaW 
atleast that many outsiders. . V. 

“We are expecting, young people, minorities, iyomep and 
Third World people/ she declared. “Some will be here W pro- 
test Overtly. Others wiU come to protest by their presence^ 

“Of course, the numbers game kvpry tricky right now 
. . •. live heard estimates ranging ‘from 10,000 to 100,001);" she 
said. “But the factors indicate that there will be kids here, 
and it would be insane for.Snowplow;tot pretend that no one’s 
going tffbehere.” ‘ , , 

The “Snowplow Company,'’ a coalition of 221ocahorgam- 
zations, Was set up late last month to arrange accommoda- 
tions for the protesters and Other non-delegates, , 

The group, which is made up primarily of organizations 
from, Miami’s- counter-culture, is hoping, to arrange for hOuS- 
ing,.foQd, childcare, medicdlcare^aiidTegal' aid. 

/ Ms. Slavitjt an associate, director of the Center for Dia. 
1 logue, 2175 NW 26th St.„ explained that the group: chosfe the 
i nanie ‘‘Miami Snowplow” because “we were looking -for a 

1 name that was cheerful, youthful and apolitical.” 

She ;said the organization wanted ■* name^ttiat peoplO 


Ms. Siavitt, who. founded, Miami Snowplow, explaaneffi 
ihdl u.e fcrmcd hec?"5“ "•"’r •mAmhers’ of the i 

counter-culture here- were concerned that no arrangements 
Werebeing made-to accommodate non-delegateS, 

She said her group is hoping to help city and' county offi-> 
cials prepare for the influx of protesters afld othernomdele.^ 
gates,, and thereby redpce the chance of “unnecessary op stu,- 
piiconffontations.’’. - ' . , 

“It seems to me that there will indeed he.a large gtpupnf 
people coining- down here/r spe said,, “ahd pH want to he aliln 
ttf 'accommoflate- anyone wHo=needs our assistance. /■ 

“If there Is nO planning or organizing done, though, there 
could he a catastrophe. We want to creater a climate down 

here thOt wili-cause this thing to fae.peacefui;” - 

Ms'. Slavltt .said her prediction that thousands will come- 
here is ,base4on discussions she-has had with-New Leffcsouro- 
esin the,Mianii arpa.and elsewhere. 

She said members of Snowplow have been mopitorlng 
the-underground press around-.the couhti^ for severalmtmths, 
and'have concluded that “perhaps now the Movement is final- 
lycoming out of the doldrums.” 

'(There is beginning to be a kind of stirring atouha the' 
country.” Ms. Siavitt said. “People are Saying, ‘K[eyj the gop- 
ventions are coming this year and the first one’s gomg to be 
.in,Miami.”’ . - - , . - — : — -M 


ffiosehh'lhft’Easf <?a&sfr~ to,Miami. wner8 ,mru 

■ Tii'i.fifcted'that thefO' will he a number of ,ls- 

sues>'wiiie& cdp- j 

.tMn«ye;Ohpst?volktiled^^^^ she.5aid,.could be delegate p 

xesgntatiomat'the'conventidh, • ‘ ' 

> - -.Thi*-year.shft'.seW,:th^^to^ 

r- S..U 

> vy-M i d Gontiiiuerf oiiSA» Cole I 


1 


1 ■ Cpntiiin^;froni Eage;5A 

Shirley Chisholm, Jonner Sen^Eugene McCarthy and the like. 

“We’ll have •women for Shirley, McGovern Democrats, 
people who want to protest ,on the Beach,” she said. “And 
then there’li be people, jvhoilt just feel that their pfesehce will - ; 
make a difference one’ way or the other,”- • | 

People’s farfy 
plans convention 

In addition, sHe saidr “it is likely”' there Will be political 
protests planned- by -black activist groups. But "the blacks are 
not together yet Oft-What they^re'.going to doi”' she said. 

Ms. Slavitt noted that one national liberal organization, 
the People’s Party, is planfitog to hold- its Own convention in 
the Miami Beach Conventipa Hall after the Democratic con- 
vention ends there, immjd-july. 

She said that the convention probably -will attract Hun- 
dreds of delegates from all over the couhtryi adding to the 
crowds of young people and activists already espected. to be, - 
here. 

Thus far, no' national anti-war organization or dvil. rights 
group has announced formal plans to sponsor a demonstra- 
tion of any sort in the Miami area.. 

But she -said that, one group — .a splinter group of the 
•Youth Internatiohai, Party, the “Yippies,” has said that .it 

will hold “an MteEaate-.convention'’TnMiarai atthd‘same;time ’ 
the Democrats' affeiheeting ht4he Seaclt. , . . ' ’ 

The Ylppie- fafetipn, called, -the' ‘‘Zippies,” held’ a' meeting 
in Madison, Wise., three, weeks ago, she said, and; drew up 
plans ,to stage a parody, of the Dempcratic parley. | 


She said the Zipples are appMently planning'^'dbgpJJ pp-- 

litical'pjovea in Miami — ^ like filling up swimraing.pools witit 
jello and that sort of thing.*’ ’> 

According, to- Npw ‘Le||'-Soufel!S in-\?!ew.York City, the 
Zipplea arp-.distributing an , elaborate poster- in Sevefal', North- 
ern citie's, inviting- people to attend their "party” in Miami 
.this'sunimer. : 

*"This.wiIl he .no.'.ordinary party,” the- pgstersays. “This 
parSj* '-.will afiske tte' BMH; 6f -Irdtfs ioofe'dike: Bf iihch.’-’ ' • 
, it; j&;iipt known how serious, the Zippies’ intentions are, 
■of'if fe^anizatioahas-any following.. 

V-, , 

Ms,.Slavitt emphasizedthather-^up'hashot-tavlte^^^ 
Zippi^s or hiiy other=grpUp'Here, but Insteadbas. simply begun- 
t» make arrangements forprotestets and oth^f non-delegates.h 


She said that the Maml Snowplow Company is: striclw 
• neutral" and "hpnpoiiticai;” andidoeanot intend fo endorse j 
.or-condemn.any-protest'here. , ’ ' j 

A statement released by the SnowplpW §onipany last j 
week emphasized.the sam# point, saying,' ‘We .endorse or sup- 1 
portno pflsitionTaken by any local dr national groupi” | 

Two bask goals ! 

of Snowplow 

the statement -said the group has been fortned to carry I 
put-two basic.goals: ! 

pto-yide services.. i.d..iioUsmg, medical, iegal. pb'* d : 
care for young and minority visitors to Dade County; ] 


( 


( 


To facilitate the efforts of any group or groups 
Wish to' make theirideas or protests Jtnd'wn ih ahiorderly and 


Ms.SIayJit also said Snowplow hopes; any protests here 
wiilhe orderly andnonvipient. .. .. 

*‘We Would like to see the city standing after it’s .prar;”' 
she said, adding that Snowplow Would like to avoid thC sort 
of confrontation' between protesters and pdike that tooK. 
placeat the. igg& pempcratic convehtion In Chicago. _ ' 

Ms, Slavitt said- civic leaders -here shpuld realize that 
' a major confrontation between protesters,, and polke Could 
have disastrous consequencesfor.thearea. ■ ^ 

Her view’was echoed by Hal Spaet, Who- ischairmaa of 
the County Youth Relations Board ahd'is an /active-Tnemfaer of 

SnoWpiow- . ■ . ^ 

' ’ 

In an interview with The Nhws„ Spaet said he, has^also- 
talked with dvie leaders In. IWiaml and’has found.:. that' “right. - 
noWi peopIe don’t want to hear uSj They ijiwt-doh?t wanfcto 
worty about. us.’’ ‘ ‘ <• 

“It’s funny,’’ he said,, "wheh it comes to -having.a. conven.i. 
tiOn here, alL:&e businessmemand ciwO leaders ioYC thevidha. 
In; fact they love the ideaNenpugh totput'up^bmUlion'tffiget 
the.cOnvention here.. , ’ . ' ' . ' ' ■ 

“But when it comes time td pi^ the price' of having, .a 
cOavehtionhere.!r^.I|,ke,.iaking;caip of-the ybungpeopiewKoJU 
hecpihing4QwmW.it -Seems thathd-ohewanfeitb^tak^^ 
".•spnnsibility for that?'"..' ■ , ' ' " 

Businessmen urged 
to help pot - - 

spaet. said he:hppeS thhf'bdlihessraOhdn-MiOTtw 

pgdza thefr responsibUit^ acconimpdkta.yisltpjs. to 

thecpnYentipb,.and wifl-'Offer-t^^^ coOpeijation feSnOwplpw^ 
before it is tboslate- to prevent major probldihsi \ • 

Wiust have a.feeling thatihe people hefe are 

an emergency’’ Spaet ;said. “Maybe wheht ibidO,® . to 26,0Q0i , 
pePpiaare stapdihg arpUnd Biscaynb Bouleyatd ](^i4r. hQWbera. 
to gpi the pepple wiiMinailydo.spmeAtagi’^ ’ ' ■ ' . 

'B.dth Spaet.and Ms. Slavitt';said they are liphing'to edist 
the cooperation of business and government tabelp 

them resolve their first matter’ of business; finding a.site fpt . 
- the;e.xp'ected:crawds:of ptote5ters.andmd4:deIega{eSi . . 

, ’“sjraerSaid that Snowplow is considering five potential' 


siteSwHere the crowds cbuld stay — Watson IsJaaiJta^'^" 
"^. Yirginia.Key, Bayfrpnt Fark and'Gratigny BarirOprated 
nccr.f'**cmi-Ccdc JunicrCc’Icgy,.HGrtli.i.aiupuSi. 

According to Spaet,, SnowpIoWis hoping to receive per-! 
mission, to- use, either Watson Fark or ihterama as campsites, 
fotthP expectedithousands offpuit-of-tpwn visitors. i 

. SpaeysaidvSnpwplowTavprs'.thpse two sites because ttey 1 
ardjafge'bnough ip hdn4e the ejcpectedcrowds, and are ofose- ; 
enough .tp.the Beach so -thatnon-delegates. could-vislt'thasite 
of the.:convention.. 

Spokesmen fpr the- 'Miami Beach police -have said they 
, will permit nonrdelegates'tp<.visit *-7- and .protest —at ■(he 
.Beachj.sp long as -they- are peaceful and do not disrupt tt*. 
busihess:p£tKe convention'. 

"Never thought’. : 1 *; 

of resiricf/ng pedp/e' 

Capt. Ozzie KnudeftiCrrOfficer in'’ch'arge of tactical po- 
' lice planning for the:- convention, said Beach police have ' 

, “Nev.er thought nbdut restrMng people from, coming over' 
here,’’ - , - 7 

. ■.HMdehier-'saidrthat^, sdfar,.BeSch'polieihave-'had nh 
dication that- demonstrations. Wili tafe .place-at ‘Miami. Beach,- 
Buthe. said, that if large-groups of protesters show up, thepOr 
lice will be .prepared.’to.bandle;the crpwds, 

, Ms: Slatdttand pther'Shot^low ieadew are^^^ 
meptWifriBeach ppHce on basis between now j^dl 

thetJuiycpnvendon,- 

. Snowplow leadersare pimining--td‘ meet with-dther. civic ; 
groups' and agencies as welL In fac^ Ms. Slavlft was sched- 
. uledtp'meCtwith-thg.Gomniuni^ Reiations^^^^^ 

Aside from- the • fienter Tor Dialogue and; the Yputh 'Reliir 
tipnsiBpar'd, the; otherdrganizati&nsfepresented- ih ShoWplpw 
,are:. /' J- . . . - ’ 

■ Switchb6,brdi;Free Medical-Clinic: Natiorial'Qtgapization 
for'Wbmeii: American CivilliibSttleS'Hnipn; ;Fjorida Interna- 
4on4 -llniversity's Police Training Froject (training Mialnt 
, leach for'-the Convention): Young 'SoeiSi.st- Afliance: Hnder^ 
grpUndil'adiaNetWprk; Radio-Station WBUS; The.Daily Plan* 
etffhe-Free--Press: iiniversity *f 'MfaratChaplains: The Wonfc, , 
en’s-fiienter;;People’-s.FaW.: Miami Liberation Front; ChristiUB: 
Cpfiimunity -Leadership - Conference!, Iputhern- Ch^stian Lea^: 
efship Conference: Gay- 'Eifa.efation Front; Interfaitb Cbuhcil' 
,.fo; fS Pciai.'|ustisef^eb:CPilrisd|ng:.Clte^^^ 
ty.'Sbh6ol. V - ' • - • ■■ 

k tk, 






Cs-!f='j=‘c»Rc> o’ Key 

CITY MANAGER 



OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER 

CITY OF MIAMI BEACH 

MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA 


February 2, 1972 


Mr. Kenneth Whittaker 
Special Agent in Charge FBI 
P. 0. Box 52-157 
Biscayne Annex 
Miami, Florida 33152 

Dear Mr. Whittaker: 

Let me extend to you the appreciation of our Mayor and 
Council and this office for your having taken the time 
to meet with us and discuss the participation of your 
agency in the security affairs concerned with the 1972 
Democratic National Convention. 

It was our pleasure to have met with you again, and 
let me assure you that the participation of your agency 
in this community project is sincerely appreciated by 
this city. 




tr' fcr' 


Airtei 


To: 


SAC £3, Boston 
Chic:^o 
Jaclisonville 
Los Angeles 


IvSami 


From: Directox’, FBI 

VvFATHFIfG 
CO; CMCAGO 


New York 
Portland 
Sacramento 
San Llego 


W VA>Xt« 


4 


2/4/72 


San Francisco 




ReBuairtel to Albany and ail other offices_dated 11/2A1, 
captioned "Demonstrations Du'ring the rbi’thcoming Political Campaign, 




Receiving offices are rominded that in carrying out instmctions 
in reaix'tel- regarding the f,"iihorlBg and reporting ot information Ymich may 
relate to the rocthcoming political camp?t.ign co not overiooi^ tiio need to 
keep tile I natiii ana San Diego O’licos iijj'oiancti Oi any pertinent oovciop -^ 
mento In “V-’eathfog and other i<C‘V; L:it /DgKive cares, incluciag' Ten 
Wanted Fugitive caces, v;hicli m:iy have si-axificrAce in tills regard. This 
would inciudo any information do'/elopci during tho fugitive Investigations 
which could have a beating on the forthcoming convondons or which might 
relate to possible activities preliminary tliereto. Tlds not only relates 
to travel or contanipiated travc4 spcciAicaliy dealing with the subjects but 
should include anytMng of pctontlal interest to tnese oificet> to do Y«?.th 

suppoii ps 2 ^onnei and identity of automobiles, presence of which in Ean 
Diego may oe^gnUicant. 

The Bureau, of course, should be a-dvised in accorciance v.iih 
instructions to reairtel. 




1 3 0> -^Y 





In Reply, Please Refer to 

File.\o. 100-44975 


DECLASSIKtMTIOH AUTHORITY DERIVED - FROM: 
FBI AUT0^5 DECLASSIFICATION GUIDE 

DATE OZ-OT-ZOlZ 


UMTKD DK P VRTM K ?VT OF JUSTICE 


FF.DEKAl. 1)1 REAL UF IN VESTIGATIO.N 
Chicago, Illinois 
January 25, 1972 



YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY 


On January 22, 1972, a first source made 
available a circular which was distributed on that 
date on the street in the vicinity of the 2400 block 
of North Lincoln Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. The circular 
contained the following information: 

’’ZIPPIE - Vote Rock in 72 

The new ZEITGEIST INTERNATIONAL PARTY, the political wing 
of the Youth International Party, will nominate a rock for 
president in 1972. Each state will hold a convention to 
decide a favorite IT candidate. The National ZIP convention 
will be held in Miami, the same time as the democratic con- 
vention. ZIPPIE, a firm believer in party politics, will 
hold a five day party during the nomination. 

The rock will then switch parties (taking John Lindsay ’6 
place as a Republican.) This change will be announced in 
San Diego during the republican convention. The Illinois 
nominating convention will take place on January 23rd in 
Chicago, All are welcome to submit candidates. The con- 
vention location will be the IWW hall 2440 North Lincoln 
Avenue in Chicago. 

Although the convention will be held in Chicago, we are 
pledged to resist interference from the Mayor's office. 

We will not let Daley choose our rocki 


ILLINOIS NOMINATING CONVENTION 2440 N. Lincoln Ave. 

•^^^ARY 23 

IMPORTANT meeting: 2 P.M. 


Further Information: (312)525-3776.' 





This document contains neither recommendation nor conclusions 
of the FBI. It is the property of the FBI and is loaned to 
your agency; it and its contents are hot to be distributed 
outside your agency. 



YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY 


The Illinois Bell Telephone Company, Public 
Information and Address Servioft, advised on January 22. 

19 72. phone numberl I is listed toF 

at 

YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY 

The Youth International Party, also known as Yippies, 
is a loosely knit, anti-establishment, revolutionary 
youth organization formed in New York City in January, 
1968. 

On January 24, 19 72, a second source, a third 
source, and a fourth source. I 

auvxsea a meeting was neid, as advertised by the circular , 
during the afternoon of January 23, 1972, in the hall at 
2440 North Lincoln Avenue, Chicago. Appro ximately twenty 
persons were in attendance at this affair, I I 


zoou North Haisted, phone 525-3776, Chicago, Illinois, 
which address is to be used as the temporary ZIPPIE head- 
quarters in Chicago, until an appropriate store front 
location can be obtained. It was noted ZIPPIE is to be 
the designation for YIP participation in the 1972 Presi- 
dential electoral process. 

During this a ffair it was stressed neither 

H or anyone else is an official 
spokesman for YIP or ZIPPIE and there is no formal YIP 
or ZIPPIE organization either on local or national levels 
which requires officers, spokesmen, or individual members. 


CONF] 


2 





\ 

conf; 


/ 


NTIAL 




Everyone is potentially a YIP or ZIPPIE and all are 
qualified to participate, regardless of age, in YIP 
or ZIPPIE activities. Anyone who desires to express 
themselves or associate with others in the trend of the 


current youtn culture in the country, wlii oe welcomed. 

YIP and ZIPPIE events will just occur, notice of 
"happenings'' will appear in future circulars or in the 
underground press. When such events are announced, 
everyone is to spontaneously show up, be happy and not 
be grim or closely allied with any specific political line. 


It was announced a Presidential candidate is 
to be selected from each state in the nation by YIP-ZIPPIE. 
These candidates are to be referred to as ”IT" candidates 
instead of "favorite son" candidates since the term "favorite 
son" has been discarded in view of sex connotation because 
"IT" candidates may be male or female. Each state "it" 
candidate is to be known as the state's "Rock." All state 
"Rock" Presidential candidates will appear at a ZIPPIE 
convention to be called "National Freak Show Exhibition," 
to elect the ZIPPIE "Rock” from the state "Rock" candidates, 
for the ZIPPIE 1972 national Presidential candidate. The 
National Freak Show Exhibition is to occur July 9 - 15, 

1972, at Miami, Florida, during the Democratic National 
Convention. The ZIPPIE national "Rock" candidate for 
President, after completion of the Democratic National 
Convention, will campaign across the country to the 1972 
Republican National Convention to be held August, 1972, 
in San Diego, California, At the Republican NationalCon- 
vention, the ZIPPIE national "Rock" candidate will switch 
parties, like Mayor John Lindsay, to seek the Republican 
party nomination. 


The following were announced as the YIP-ZIPPIE 
calendar of events, it being again emphasized that these 
activities are only tentative and a close watch should be 
maintained for announcements of events as they are to 
occur : 



3 




YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY 



February 22, 1972 - Chicago, demonstration at American 

Broadcasting Company (ABC) , 190 
North State, The network will 
refuse a one-minute "equal” TV time for the ZIPPIE Illinois 
"Reck" candidate to respond to other Presidential candidates. 
Will call ABC prior to demonstration time asking for the 
equal political time. When refused, will demonstrate against 
discrimination. 


March 3, 1972 - 

March 4, 1972 - 

April 1, 1972 - 

April 15, 1972 - 

April 15, 1972 - 

May 1, 1972 - 
June 2-4, 1972 
July 1-3, 1972 
July 4, 1972 - 


Chicago, ZIPPIE bands to perform 
at either the IWW hall, 2440 Lincoln 
Avenue, or Young Lords Church on 
Armitage Avenue. 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin - ZIPPIE 
bands to perform March 5, 1972 - 
Madison, Wisconsin - ZIPPIE bands 
to perform. 

Chicago, ZIPPIE marijuana "smoke- 
in" in Lincoln Park to express 
opposition to marijuana laws. 

Springfield, Illinois -"ZIPCOMETAX" 
meeting to plan for Illinois state- 
wide marijuana "smoke-in". 

Springfield, Illinois - statewide 
"smoke- in" to protest anti-marijuana 
laws. 

Nationwide-"Joint Day" protest 
against marijuana laws. 

Madison, Wisconsin - Midwest 
regional ZIPPIE meeting. 

Washington, D. C. - "Gathering of 
Tribes." 

Washington, D. C. - Third national 
annual marijuana "smoke-in" protest 
against anti-marijuana laws. 



4 


YOUTH INTERNAT IONAL Pjf^TY C Olmx^S^fl AL 

July 9 - 15; 1972 - ftfiami, Florida - Democratic 

National • Convention, holding of 
ZIPPIE National Freak Show Exhi- 
bition. 

August, 1972 - San Diego, California - Republican 

National Convention where ZIPPIE 
"Rock" Presidential candidate will 
sv/itch parties. 



w ® '■■k ■ 

In Reph , Please Refer tu 
File -\w. 


L^■ITED STATES DEPART^rE.^■T OF JUSTICE 

1- I-. D 1:, H A L B L K L A U OF 1 A’ V E S T 1 G A T ION 

Chicago, Illinois 
January 25, 1972 


Title 


YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY 


Character 


Reference 


INTERNAL SECURITY - YIP 

letterhead memorandum 
dated and captioned as 
above . 


are conee.tii; (except any listed belov) whose Identities 

iSo^tloi in th^lLT f”»iehed reliable 




I>D-36 (Rsv. 5-22-64) 


Transmit the following in 


V^in A I R T E L 


DECLASSIFICATION AUTHORITY DERIVED | I 
FBI AUTOMATIC DECLASSIFICATION GUIlJl 

DATE OZ-07-Z01Z I 


Date: 1/25/72 


(Type in plaintext or code) 


(Priority) 


DIRECTOR, FBI (100-448910) 


FROM 


SAC, CHICAGO (100-44975) (P) 


SUBJECT: YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY (YIP) 

IS - YIP 

(00: NY) 

Re Chicago Nltel to the Bureau dated 1/24/72. 

Enclosed for the Bureau are eight copies of 
a Letterhead Hemorandiua (LHM) dated and captioned as 
above. Copies of the enclosed LHM are designated for 
offices as listed for receipt of this airtel. 

Copies of the enclosed LHM are being furnished 
to U. S. Secret Service, Chicago, and Region 7, 112th 
Military Intelligence Group, Fort Sheridan, Illinois. 


Chica 




W*Jl 


rsx so 
cond s 
ird so 


Approved: 


Special Agent in Charge 












CG 100-44975 


COPIES 


(1 

(1 

(1 

(1 

(1 

(1 

(1 

(1 

GGP:CMS 

(25) 


Bureau (Enc. 8) (RM) 

(100-1«02S) (Enc i. 3) (EM) 

100- ) (democratic national convention, 1972) 

Milwaukee (100-15948) (Enc. 2) (RM) 

New York (100-162260) (Enc. l)(Info)(RM) 

San Diego (Enc. 2) (RM) 

(1 - 100-16200) (REPUBLICAN NATIONAL CONVENTION, 1972) 
Springfield (100-15948) (Enc. 2) (RM) 

WPO (100-48355) (Enc. 2) (RM) 

U. S, Secret Service, Chicago 
(Via Courier) 

112th Military Intelligence, 

Fort Sheridan, Illinois (Via Courier) 

Chic£^o 


100- 

100- 

100-52009 






CONVENTION, 1972) 


- ii - 



CG 100-44975 


The enclosed LHM is classified ** Cuuf iUentiall* 
because it contains information received from sources 
of continuing value, the unauthorized disclosure of which 
could reveal their identities, compromise their future 

effectiveness and thereby adversely Effect the security 

of the nation. 


MIAMI, MILWAUKEE. SAN DIEGO. SPRINGFIELD AND WFO 


Will inform appropriate law enforcement and 
interested government Intelligence agencies of announced 
activity in their respective divisions identified in the 
enclosed LHM. 

CHICAGO 


follow 


AT CHICAGO, ILLINOIS. Will continue to closely 


Les oi 





F B I 


(Rev. 5-22-64) 


Transmit the following in 


TELETYPE 


Date: 1/27/72 
ENCODE 

(Type in plaintext or code) 

URGENT 

(Priority) 


TO: DIRECTOR, FBI (100-^59771) (ATT: DID) 

FROM: SAC, NEW YORK (100-169939) 

V 

PE0PLES__C0A LITION FOR PEACE AND J USTICE ( PCPJ), IS-NEl-7 
LEFT, 00:NY. 

PCPJ/.SELF DESCRIBED AS CONSISTING OF OVER ONE HUNDRED 
ORGANIZATIONS USING MASSIVE CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE TO COMBAT RACISM, 
POVERTY, REPRESSION AND WAR. ITS NATIONAL OFFICE ISIDCATED AT 
ONE FIVE SIX FIFTH AVE., NYC. 

SAS 0F FBI OBSERVED PCPJ PRESS CONFERENCE IN FIRST 
FLOOR AUDITORIUM AT THREE FOUR FIVE EAST FORTY SIXTH STREET, 

NYC, ON JANUARY TWEITTY SEVEN, INSTANT, BETWEEN ELEVEN TEN AM ANd! 

(DEMOS, DEMOCRATTO CONV£mOJl)r:(AMr'^^^ „ \ 

Mnn- ‘ — T~1 T (AM) j-a ^ /7.^j I 


"2i^Nev/ark (100- V I (AM) 

•i (1-100- ) I I , 

2-Philadelphia (100- D ~l (AM) 

(1-100- ) (HARRISBURG DEFENSE COl-MITTEE) 

1-San Diego (3 ,00- 'I f DEM OS. REPUBLICAN CONVENTION) (AM) b7( 
l-lOO-lgS^-^T} ] I 

1 - 100 - I I (i( 5 ) ^ 

1-100- CtjriRT.Ti vvAr v r-’.n^iPRRRwr’.R) (44) b-V 

1-100-170991 I I (42) ' ' i) I -J T, 

1-IQ0-1606AA VwAw^ (hp\ . . . 1..1 .- 

1-100-85686 I (45) . 

1-100-146684 (WSP) (42) • isEARCHfr.' , — I j 

1-Supervisor #42 - > — 4 seriah?' ^ ^ ^ - | 

JFM-.ihr / 

/ 


Approved: 


lp% V.-- 

11 ktI Rc 


Special ftgont in Charge 


.M Per 



FD-36 (Rov. S-22-64) 


Transmit the following in 


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NY 100-169939 
PAGE TWO 


ELEVEN FIFTY AM. ABOUT TWENTY FIVE PERSONS ATTENDED. ON STAGS 
PACING AUDIENCE WERE 
OP PCPJ 

FAMILIES OP SERVICEMEN DETAINED IN NORTH VIETNAM (COLIFAM), 


AND AN UNIDENTIFIED WHITE MLE IN GARB OF CLERGYMAN 
WHO ACTED AS MASTER OF CEREMONIES'.’ 


READ PARTS OF A PRESS STATEMENT ISSUED BY 
PCPJ IN ANSWER TO THE SPEECH OP PRESIDENT RICHARD M. NIXON ON 
JANUARY in-lENTY FIVE, LAST, ON PEACE INITIATIVES OF UNITED STATES 
GOVERNMENT TO BRING A NEGOTIATED SETTLEiyENT TO END THE WAR IN 
VIETNAM. COPIES OF STATB 4 ENT WAS ISSUED TO THOSE IN ATTENDANCE. 
V 7 SISS STATED THAT THE EIGHT POII^S PRESENTED BY THE PRESIDENT 
WERE NOTHING NEW. SHE EMPHASIZED THAT IN ORDER TO OBTAIN PEACE, 
THE PRESIDENT MUST SET A CERTAIN DATE FOR TOTAL WITHDRAWAL OF AL 
UNITED STATES FORCES AND EQUIPMENT^ FROM INDOCHINA AND IT IS ONLY 


Approved: 


.M Per 


Special Agent in Charge 





frj.'iSJT.li the following in 


Date: 


(Type in plaintext or code) 


(Priority) 


ni 100-169939 

PAGE THREE 


AFTER DATE IS SET CAN A POLITICAL SETTLEI4ENT BE REACHED. ALSO 
THE UNITED STATES 14UST STOP THE BO^^BING IN INDOCHINA IMMEDIATELY 
AND I-iUST WITHDRAW SUPPORT OF THE REGIME OF PRESIDENT THIEU OP 
SOUTH VIETNAM. 


SPOKE AND STATED THAT THE SO-CALLED NETf 
PEACE INITIATIVES ARE MERELY A REHASH OP THOSE ISSUED BY FORI'IER 

■b’ 

PRESIDENT LYNDON B. JOHNSON IN THAT BOTH ARE BASED ON THE b 

MAINTENANCE OP UNITED STATES POWER IN SOUTHEAST ASIA. A SEARCH 
FOR A SETTLEMENT IN VIETNAM ICUST -INCLUDE A SHARING OP POWER IN 
SOUTH VIETNAM BETWEEN THE NATIONAL LIBERATION FRONT AND OTHER 


ELEMENTS. 



NNOUNCED THE FOLLOWING ACTIONS BY "PEACE 


FORCES" IN. A CONTINUANCE OF THE PEACE STRUGGLE: 

FEBRUARY ELEVEN TO THIRTEEN, NEXT: A LARGE NUl-lBER OF 
AMERICANS WILL PARTICIPATE IN WORLD PEACE CONFERENCE IN PARIS, 


PRANCE. 


FEBRUARY TWENTY, NEXT: DEMONSTRATION AT AIRPORT ^sTiEK 


PRESIDENT NIXON DEPARTS FOR PEKING. 


Approved: 


Special Agent in Charge 


.M Per 





FD-36 {Rev. S-22-G4) 


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F B 1 


Date: 


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(Priority) 


HY 100-169939 
page four 


APRIL TITO TO POUR, NEXT: PEACE FORCES IN EAST WILL 
CONVERGE ON liARRISBURG, PENNSYLVANIA TO DEMONSTRATE ON BEHALF 
OP "HARRISBURG EIGHT" ON TRIAL FOR CONSPIRACY TO KIDNAP A 
GOVERNMENT OFFICIAL AND TO DESTROY GOVERNMENT PROPERTY. 

APRIL FIFTEEN, NEXT: LOCAL DEMONS TPAT IONS THROUGHOUT 
THE UNITED STATES TO PROTEST USE OF TAX PAYERS DOLLARS TO 
COl^TINUE WAR.' 

EARLY IvlAY: SERIES OF DECENTRALIZED DEITONSTRATIONS AGAINS 

UNITED STATES CORPORATIONS PRODUCING WEAPONS FOR WAR CULMINATING ’ 

\ 

IN A LARGE NON-VIOLENT CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE TYPE DEMONSTRATION. 

DATE AS YET UNDECIDED. - 

■ JULY and AUGUST: DEMONSTRATIONS AT DEMOCRATIC AND j 
REPUBLICAN PARTY CONVENTIONS AT MIAMI, FLORIDA AND SAN DIEGO J 
CALIFORNIA. 


OTHER SPEAKERS INCLUDED MEMBER OF EXECUTIVE 

COMMITTEE, VIETNAM VETERANS AGAINST THE WAR (WAW), WHO 

be 

CRITICIZED THE PRESIDENTS SPEECH AS PRESUPPOSING THE RIGHT OF b?c 
THE UNITED STATES TO INTERVENE IN THE VlAR IK VIETNAM. 


Approved: 


Special Agent in Charge 


.M Per 



Fp*35 (Res-- 5-22-64) 


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m 100-169939 

PAGE FIVE 


F B I 


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ALSO SPOKE OF REPRESSION IN THE UNITip STATES AS MOST RECENTLY 
ILLUSTRATED • BY THE ARREST IK FLORIDA OF A REGIONAL COORDINATOR 
OF V\?AW ON TRUMPED-UP CHARGES OP KIDNAPPING AND EXTORTION. 

OF WOMENS STRIKE FOR PEACE (WSP) STATED 
U?HE WSP WILL ISSUE A PAPER ACCUSING THE PRESIDENT OF STALLING ON 
THE PEACE ISSUE. THIRTEEN ^^E^^BERS OF WSP WILL B\ RTICIPATE IK 
¥ORLD PEACE CONFERENCE, PARIS, FRANCE, FEBRUARY ELEVEN TO 

b ^ 

THIRTEEN, NEXT. .* . b/ 

THE WSP IS A NATIONAL WOf4ENS ORGANIZATION THAT HAS IN 

THE PAST PARTICIPATED IN DEMONSTRATIONS AGAINST THE DRAFT, NUCLEAR 

TESTING AND THE V7AR IN VIETNAM. ' 

OF HARRISBURG DEFEI'ISE COMMITTEE AND 

NATIONAL INTERIM COi-OvlITTEE OF PCPJ, STATED THAT THERE ARE OBVIOUS 

• \ 

PARALLELS BETViEEiT PRESIDENT NIXON’S STATEMENT AND REPRESSION IN 
THE UNITED STATES. HE ACCUSED THE AMERICAN GOVERNMEOT OF ■ 
ATTEIviPTING TO DISCREDIT THE PEACE MOVEMENT, PARTICULARLY THE 
"CATHOLIC LEFT" BY IvlAKlNG I*T APPEAR THAT THOSE IN THE MOVEMENT 
ARE TERRORISTS. . ’ 


Approved; 


Special Agent in Charge 


.U Per 



Fp-36 (Rev. 5-22-64) 


Transmit the following in 


Date: • 


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(Priority) 


NY 100-169939 
PAGE SIX 


3 P 0 KE ON THE LACK OF CREDIBILITY OF 
THE CURRENT ADMINISTRATION AS ILLUSTRATED BY REVATIONS EXPOSED TI- 
THE "ANDERSON PAPERS." 


COPY OF INSTANT TEL DISSEILENATED TO SECRET SERVICE, 


NYC. 


administrative 


RENYTEL, JANUARY TV 7 ENTY SEVEN, INSTANT^ 
OBSERVING SAS WERE IaNdI 




air mail copies to MIAMI ’regarding DEI-IOCRATIC 
CONVENTION, TO SAN DIEGO REGARDING REPUBLICAN CONVENTION AND 
PHILADELPHIA REGARDING AND HARRISBURG DEFENSE 

COMMITTEE. COPY TO NEWARK REGARDINgI I AND 

liHM TO FOLLOW. 


Approved: 


Special Agent in Charge 


-M Per 


tr' tr' 



FD-350 (Rev. 7-16-63) 

(' 


(Mount Clipping in Space Below) 


(Indicate page, name of 
newspaper, city and state.) 


6-A 


MIAMI NEWS 
MIAMI , 3F1,0RIDA 


Date: 2/3/72 

Edition: 

Author: 

Editor: 

Title: DEMOCRATIC 
NATIONAL CONVENTION 

dharacter: 

or 

Classification; 80-1353 
Submitting Office; MIAMI, FLA. 

I { Being Investigated 



I 


By ROBERT B. STULBERG ! 

Mlafni ' Ntws'Rtmrl tr 

Miami BeacK Police Chief 
Rocky Potilerance today an- 
nounced that police •will set 
aside two Ittgd lots outside 
the Miami Beach Convention'. 
Hall for protesters wishing to 
demonstrate , at the Demo- 
cratic National Convention 
this summer. . 

Speaking at the monthly 
forum of the Community Re- 
lations Boc^, Pomerance 
said the two Jots ^ll accom- 
modate about “a thousand to 
t'wo' thousand” protesters 
each. ' 

Asked at the meeting what 
police will do if additional 
protesters arrive at the 
Beach, the poHcef chief said, 
“Wi^lihave: to worry abouitit 
at the: time, but we?U have 
additional pans to fall back 
tOi” ' 

He declined to say what ; 
sprtof “additioiial plans” the • 
Beach police have made, but 
He said thS security forces 
for the convention will he 
prepared for large numbers ' 
of demonstrators. 

Pomerance made his re, 
marks aftef two speakers 
. told the CRB- that at least 
i 0 , 06 d protesters, observers 
and other non-delegates are 
expected to visit Dade Coun- 
ty during the convention this 
July. 

\ The speakerSj Lynn Sfavitt. 
M the Center, for Dialogic 

f nd Hal Bpaet of the You|i 
•Relations Board, addressed 
the CRB ns representatives 
<jf “The Miami Snowplow 
Company*’ — a newly 
formed coalition of. liberal 
groups in Miami set tip last 
monOI to arrange aoconimo- 
dations for the thousands of 
non-delegates. 

The Snowplow Company, 
which Is made up of 22 orga- 
nizations in Miami, is trying 
to arrange for food, housing 
and medical and legal aid for 
the expected crowd of non- 
delegates. " ■ “'t ■ 


The group , whinlij consists 
p rimar ily of representatives 
from Miami’s counter-cul- 
turSi is iiylng to enlist the 
cooperation of the CRB and | 
other local service groups m 
its effort. 

At • yestetday’s meeting,, 

J ls. Slavitt, founder of Snow4 

ow,. told the CRB that be- j- 
tween 10,000 and 50,000? 
yoUng people, women, minor- 
ities and other nbn-delegates 
are expected to be here dur- 
ingthe convention. 

She said that if- the CRB 
and other groups in the city 
make-preparation for the in- 
flux, Miami will be able to 
avoid any “unnecessary con- 
frontation.” 

“No one here needs to he 
told what happened in Chica- 
,go,” Ms. Slavitt said,, .refer- 
ring to the 1968 Democratic 
Convention in, Chicago, 
which was the scene of vio- 
lent confrontations between 
protesters and police; 

“Whathappened in Chica- 
go happened because thertf 
was no piartning before* 


fhand,” MS, Slavitt said, add* I 
- ing, “If there is proper plahi : 
ning here, Miami can coma 
out Of this looking like a ter- 
rific cityj” ■ 

In bis-remarksi Chief Pom- 
erance echoed Ms. Slavitt’s 
statement about the conven-r 
tion, saying he also is hoping 
‘ ‘to avoid any friction with 
non-delegates-here. 

He said, -the Beach police 
have already begun special 
training courses at Florida 
International University t° 
leam how to deal with large 
crowds, of protesters, in the' 
event that they should arrive. 

“We’re trying to ^va the 
officers ati intelligent ap- 
praisal of their own rolei” 
the polic e, chief, .s aid. “We 
want to show tSe^olice offi- 


cerwhy-hq ' 

the community is expecting 
ofhimi^’ 

In addition, he said, the 
riU trd;r.:r.s pr?sr!»r" 
geared to helping . the police 
“better •understand the -dis- 
senter,” To this end, he said, 
the police are being trained 
hot only i n crowd - control 
tactics, but in “behavioral at- 
, titudes" and In the history of 
dissent in this country. 

Pomerance told the audi- 
ence of 100 thajt the police 
Will tty to “stay in the back- 
ground” at the convention 
and “will try -to maintain a 
supportive role” throughout 
the event. 

He said that one oMiis pri- 
mary goals .at'thecon.vehtio!t 
will be to “remove the abra* 
sive role of the police as a 
factor.” 

The federally appointed 
Walker Commission, v;hich- 
studied the 1968 confronta- 
tions in Chicago,, concluded 
that abrasive police -action* 
Was largely responsible for 
what it termed “i police 
riot" in that city. 

Pomerance told the CRBt 
that he has. written 'g letter - 
|o' -the Greater Miami Coali-1 
ion. suggesting- that they inis 1 
iate a study of problems'] 
Concerning the convention, i 



fn Reply, Please Refer to 
File No. 


DATE 02-1^201Z 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 


DECLASSIFICATION AUTHORITY DERIVED FROM 
FBI AUTCj|J|IC DECLASSIFICATION GUIDE 


FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 


Milwatikee, Wisconsin 
January 28, 1972 




lAL 


YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY 
PRESIDENTIAL NOMINATING CONVENTION 
JANUARY 23, 1972 
CHICAGO,. ILLIN0I-S 


DEMONSTRATIONS DURING THE 
DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION 
JULY, 1972 

-MIM4L,^ORIDAr 



(Reference is made to Milwaukee memorandum 

aptioned, ’’Youth 1 
January 7-9, 1972^ 


dated January 14, 1972, captioned, ’’Youth International 
P«T*fcv? ’ Pr*A— Cntrf * • .laniiA-rv 7-9* 1972f Madison* 


Party I Pre-Conference 
Wisconsinc”) 



This document contains neither recommendations nor 
conclusions of the FBI. It is the property of the 
FBI and is loaned to your agency; it and its contents 
are not to be distributed outside your agency. 



< 


* * 



YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY 
PRESIDENTIAL NOMINATING CONVENTION 
JANUARY 23- 1972 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

DEMONSTRATIONS DURING THE 
DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION 
JULY, 1972 

MIAMI, FLORIDA 


YOUTH INTERNATIONAL ' PARTY 


The Youth International Party 
(YIP), also kno’tra as Yippies, 

•is a loosely~knit, anti- 
establishment, revolutiona^ 
youth organization formed in 
New York City in January, 1968, 

A first source, who has furnished reliable 
information in the past, advised on January 26, 1972, 
that a flyer was publicly distributed in the Madison, 
Wisconsin, area on or about January 22. 1972, bearing 
the caption, ’’Zippie— Vote Rock in *72’’. 

This flyer, in part, reads as follows: 

"The new Zeitgeist International Party, 
the political -wing of the YIP will nominate 
a rock for President in 1972, ^ Each state 
will hold a convention to decide a favorite 
IT candidate. The National ZIP Convention 
will be held in Miami the same time as the 
Democratic Convention, . , 

II 

• • • 

”The Illinois nominating convention will 
take place on Janua^ 23rd in Chicago, All 
are welcome to submit candidates. The con- 
vention location V7ill be the IWW Hall, 2440 
North Lincoln Avenue in Chicago. 


CONFIDSOTIAL 




YOUTH INTEBNATIONAL PABTY ^ 
PRESIDENTIAL NOMINATING CONVENTION 
JANUARY 23j 19?2 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

DEMONSTRATIONS DURING THE 
DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION 
JULY, 1972 
MIAMI, FLORIDA 



iney also tentatxveiy agreed on the toiiowlng tunctions 
to be held prior to the Miami action: 


February 22, 1972 Demonstration against the 

American J3roadcasting Corpora- 
tion (ABC) Network, 190 North 
State Street, Chicago. This 



4 




CONFIDENTIAL 


YOUTti INiERiNAilOwAL PARiY 
PRESIDElMilAL NOMlNAlTNG CONVENTION 
JANUARY 23. ]l.97,2 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

DEMONSTRATIONS DURING THE 
DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION 
JULY, 1972 

MIAMI, FLORIDA 


demonstration will be for 
the purpose of demanding 
"equal time for our candidate, 
the rock." Invitations will 
be extended to news media of 
all types, 

February 23, 1972, Chicago press conference. . 

March 3, 1972 .Chicago rock group benefit, 

April 1, 1972. Chicago anti-marijuana law 

"smoke-in" to commence at 
12 noon, 

Springfield, Illinois, State 
Capitol Building anti-marijuana 
law "smoke- in". 


May 1, 1972 





YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY 
PRESIDENTIAL NOMINATING CONVENTION 
JANUARY 23, 1972 
CHICAGO, -ILLINOIS 

DEMONSTRATIONS DURING THE 
DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION 
JULY, 1972 

MIAMI, FLORIDA 


In addition to agreeing on pre-Miami YIP functions 
in Illinois, other YIP functions out of state were tenta- 
tively mentioned. These functions are as follows: 

March 4, 1972, ,,,,,, .Madison rock group benefit. 


March 5, 1972... ...Milwaukee rock group benefit. 

April 15, 1972..,,,., Madison “Zipcome Tax Day”. 

Regional pre-Miami ZIP 
Conference, 


A representative at the Conference from the 
Midwest Dope Dealers Association said that his group 
would provide marijuana at wholesale prices for all 
of the YIP "smoke- ins"; however, the money for this 
commodity would have to be obtained in advance. 

Tom Forcade, a YIP activist from the East 
Coast, is scheduled to provide the music for the 
rock group benefits. These benefits will hopefully 
raise the necessary funds needed for the YIP functions. 
Forcase was not at the Chicago Convention. 


■bo 

b7C 

b7D 



6 



• . • 



YOUTH INTEINATIONAL PARTY 
PP^SIDENTIAL NOMINATING CONVENTION 
JANUARY 23, 1972 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

DEMONSTRATIONS DURING THE 
DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION 
JULY, 1972 
MIAMI, FLORIDA 



tr cr' tr' 




(FriorUy) 


FIIOM 


DIRECTOR, FBI 
SkC. MILWAUKEE (P) 


SUBJECT: YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY (YIP) 

IS YIP 

BUFILE 100-448910 
MI 100-15948 

DEMONSTRATION DURING THE 
FORTHCOMING POLITICAL CAMPAIGN 
MI 100» 18949 

MIDEM 

MI 100-19451 


bearing dual caption, "Youth International Party (YIPjj 
* Pre-Conference ^ I January 7-9, 1972? Madison, Wisconsin; 
IS - YIP** and "Demonstration During the Forthcoming 
Political Campaign. " 


Bureau (Enc-13) (A.M-RM) 

2 ~ 100- (YIP) 

1 - 100- (CALREP) 

1 - 100- (midem) 

1 - 100- (Deinonstration - Political Campaign) 

Milwaukee 

1 - 100-15948 (YIP - Madison) 

1 - 100-16644 (YIP - Milwaukee) 

i - 100-18949 (Demonstration - Political Campaign.) 

1 - 100-19451 (MIDEM) ^ 

1 - 100-16557 n /> J 

1 - 100-17598 X 

1 - 100-15922 J , X / 

2 - lOO-new LNU) ^ — / 


TRMfgms 


SEE PAGE 2 FOR ADDITI 


Special Ar.ent in Chare 


if if 







FD-36 (Rev. 5-22-64) 


Transmit the following in 


Date: 


(Type in plaintext or code) 


(Priority) 


MI 100-15948 
MI 100-18949 
MI 100-19451 


COPIES CONTINUED: 


8 - CMcago (EnC“8) (AM- EM) 

I - 100- (YIP) , 

1 - 100- (Demonstration - Political Campaim) 

1 - 100- (Midwest Dope Dealers Association) 

1 - 100- >^qF■F■n^ 

1 - 100- bo 

1 - 100- b7C 

1 — 100 — 

1 - 100- i NU) 

3 - MiaiBi (Enc-3) (AM-KM) 

1 - 100- (YIP) , 

1. - 100- (Demonstration - Political Campaign) 

100- (MIDEM) 

3^'~New York (Enc-3) (AM-RM) 

1 - 100- (YIP) 

1 - 100” (Demonstration - Political Campaign) 

1 - 100- (T. FORGADE) 

2 - Springfield (Enc-2) (AM-RM) 

1- 100- (YIP) 

1 - 100- (Demonstration - Political Campaign) 

3 - WO (Enc-3) (AM-RM) 

1 - 100- (YIP) 

1 - 100- (Demonstration - Political Campaign) 

1 - 100- (t, FORCADE) 


Approved: 


Special .Agent in Charge 


M Per — 

'(ir U. S. COVEriNM^NT PRINTINS OFFICE^ 197 i -4I3-I3S 


FD-36 (Rev. S-22-64) 

• . • 


Transmit the following in 


Via 


MI 100-15948 
MI 100-18949 
MI 100-19451 


F B 1 
Date: 


(Type in plaintext or code) 


(Priority) 


L 


Referenced airtel enclosed a letterhead memorandum 
(LHM) setting forth functions agreed to at the Madison, Wis- 
consin, "Pre-Conference” to publicize Youth International 
Party (YIP) protest plans to be held durj-iig the Democratic 
National Convention at Miami, Florida, during the Summer 
of 1972. 


Enclosed for the Bureau are thirteen (13) copies 
of an LHM, dated as above, and captioned, "Youth Inter- 
national Party (YIP)| Presidential Nominating Convention; 
January 23, 1972; Chicago, Illinois” and "Demonstrations 
During the Democratic National Convention; July, 1972; 
Miami, Florida," 

Enclosed LHM is classified "CgpBSd^tlal" as 
it contains information furnished by confidential sources 
of continuing value, the unauthorized disclosure of whose 
identities may compromise them, thereby possibly having 
an adverse effect on the defense 3.nterests of this country. 

The enclosed LHM has been prepared by Milwaukee 
to apprise the Bureau and interested governmental agencies 
of all infoiCTation ascertained by Milwaukee regarding the 
Illinois Nominating Convention, 


Sources concealed in the enclosed IHM are 
identified as follows: 



Approved: 


Special Agent in Charge 


Sent M Per 

'fir U. S. GOVE->!NKE1 hT PR.NTfNiS OFFICE: 1971 -A13 -I2S 



vii 


MI 100-15948 
MI 100-18949 
MI 100-19451 


I I individual identified in 

enclosed LHM as the person from Wisconsin who initiated 
the trip of Wisconsin people to the Illinois Convention, 
is on the Milwaukee ADEX, 

Other individuals identified, from the Milwaukee 
Division, as having attended the Convention j — are subjects 
of Milwatike e security investigations excep t (LNU), 

who resides 

A new security investigation is being initiated 
on this pei'son to effect her identity and to detemine if 
she is a threat to the security of this country^ 

Chicago and Springfield should insure that 
appropriate local authorities are apprised of !^IP pro- 
test activities planned for their respective territories, 

Miami is being advised of the results of the 
Illinois Convention as YIP matters discussed there con- 
cern the Democratic Presidential Convention to be held 
in Miami , 

Copies of the enclosed LHM are also being 
furnished to New York and Xteshington Field as planned 
acti\d.ties for TOM FORCADE were mentioned at the Illinois 
Convention. 

Milwaukee will follow YIP activities planned 
for Wisconsin and insure that the Bureau and interested 
governmental agencies are advised on a timely basis of 
pertinent information ascertained. 


4 


Approved: 


Special Agent in Charge 


Sent 


M Per 


U. S. GOVE:RN^r*^.^T PRINTING OFF«CC. 1971 —419—133 



SD 100-l6200~Sub 10 


coverage of militant individuals from this group who 
might come to the convention, efforts should be initiated 
by receiving offices to develop informants v/ho will be able 

J 4 *1 J n ^ ^ -Tv J - - 

oo uu w cuj 

The Bureau has instructed that recommendations 
concerning informants' attendance at the convention should 
be submitted to the Bureau and San Diego, Specific comments 
should be made concerning each informant's position in the 
organization or Nex^ Left Movement, code name, mode of travel, 
and a concise breakdov/n of estimated expenses. Also include 
in recommendation estimated number of individuals, including 
delegates, xirho will attend convention from informant's 
immediate area. Recommendations should be submitted as 
soon as possible in order for the Bureau to evaluate each 
recommendation . 

Shortly prior to the convention, San Diego v/ill 
furnish the Bureau and receiving offices the contact 
telephone number and the name of the Special Agent to be 
contacted by informants during the convention. 


FD-350 (Rev. 7-16-63) 

% 

{ 


(Mount Clipping in Space Below) 


s iiMM 


(Indicate page, name of 
newspaper, city and state.) 


7^k 

MIAMI HERALD 
MIAMI, FLORIDA 




Date: 2/8/72 

Edition: 

Author: 

Editor: 

DEMOCRATIC 
NATIONAL, CONVENTION 
/ 

Character: 

Classification: 80^l353"y|^^ 

Submitting Office: MIAMI, FLA 

I I Being Investigated 









, S, BRGDEStr ‘ fi. 

Of Th» Washington Post 

THE. Democratic nomination B^ttigris 
off to a good starti with enough. contra- 
dictory signals from Arizona, Iowa, 
Florida aiid New Hampshire to confuse 
the commentators and 
to create the pleasant- 
ij 4<,riglmg sense of an 
‘ ticipation that the con- 
test will, Indeed, build- 
to a climax in Miami 
Beach, in July. 

If that proves to be^ 
the case, then , it might 

; be well to keep your- 
, eye on Lawrence F. 

OlBrieh. The Demo- 
cratic national chair- 
man will be right in the middle cf the i 
; action in Miami if this convention, i 
.which he insists will be his last hurrah ; 
at the party helm, turns out to be the j 
,wirigding:it promiseSto be. 
i 0’Brien is determined to' do every- 
thing, possible to se,e- that the Democrats, 
emerge from the 1B72 oonventiOn with^ 

, out the damage to their morale and 
■unity ^they suffered in Chicago in 1968.' 

' That, is a tall order, but if ihefei is any- 
one iiitheparty whO'-cambring .the DetiiT 
■dcrats through Miami ih .oiie p.iec-e i 
0!Brieh is the, manl ‘ ‘ ' ' 

DESIDED by sortie liberals fop his 
1968' flip-flops on- candidates and issues, 

I distrusted by some p.irty reformers, ahi 

denounced by Geotge Wallace, the old 
pro. from- Springfield, Mass.,, appears to. 

■ be enjoying his;place.at the center of the 
Dempcrafic stofm. 

it is his decidedly old.-fashioned no- 
tion that one- of the things the country- 
needs in this electron year is -a return to- 
two-party politics a chance for the 
winning candidate tO'gaih- a .genuine.ma- 
jority, instead of the- .wobbly plurality ' 
wl&'Which Mr; Nixori has been attempt- 
itigho govern. 

As a partisan, 0'Bfign 'is phrsuadedi,: 
of course,, that the Demoefats haye the 

■ best chance of winning that, maibrity. 
But whoever wins, he says held father 
-take- his chances in' a- strajghi-out test 
between the-major parties than. In aeon- 
test clouded by Wallace and perhaps 
some champion of a left-wing; fourth 

I party as well. ' • 

\Believing‘this, O’Brien has somewhat 
grudgingly accepted the necessity of 
dealing; it}: Miami with every breed of 
-Democrat from Wallace to Eugene J. 
McCarthy. 

HE HAS backed Off from his chal- 
lenge tp Wallace’s right to call himself a- 
Democrat and' has accepted the Ala- 
bama governor’s promise -that* his- dele- i 
gates would, sign the party'loyalty oath. 

.To satiatv the McCarthy ' refoime.rs 
on the opposite flank, he is^trinng td 



si 


pro-ve the openness, of the- cotlvennoh oy 
flooding the country with detailed how-, 
to-dodt kits instructing would-be dele- 
gates hoW they can enter- the ‘pre-con- 
vehtiombattles, in.their-o.wn:states. ’ ' 
While opening the, doors to all self- 
proclaimed Democrats, however obstre- 

pirC’JC rlnir»rT’V»i<l friscf fo 

control of the -vital power centers of the 
convention. His former Post Office De- 
partment deputy, Richard, J. Murphy, is 
the convention, manager which means 

OiBrien will control the logistics,, the 
schedule and the communications nrt- 
worlrin MiamlBeaoh. 


1 -He has his. personal choice,. Patricia- 
Roberts Harris, running the .credentials 
, conimittee , having engineered' her elec- 
tioii by -the national committee over 
Sen. Harold ,E. Hughes In a stiff strug- 
gle that pitted his power against that of 
most of the major Presidential con^ 
tenders., 

V yERY shortly now, -he will exercise 
h s option to name the temporary chairj" 
n an.of the platform Committee. He is ,s; 

i^t on file rumors that he -kas his eyi 
on a Sdufhem-accented young progre!. 
sive -’for that post, but it’s safe to- say: 
that whoever OlBrieti picks, there will 
be'complaints. 


As tha chairman realizes full well, 

„ the Democratic convention' cannot be’ 
tranquil,. There will be .open' battles over 
everything from the seating- of the -dele- 1 
gations, to the drafting and ratification; - 
of the pUtform to the choice of the, 
PrMidential nominee. 0’*Brie,mexpects .a- 
nufaber of flbor nominations for Vic2 ' 

Pipident,.everr:if the Presidential candl 
djjte exercises. HiS rightfo “retibnimen# ' 
'a.riinning-mate. 

Blit .O^Brien.’s boast is that he-wiff 
see to- it that- whatever the outcome of' 
these, fights, every “reasonable”’: Demo- 
drat‘is going to- fe§i"he.’s hadLS fair, 
shake. That fair-play pledge- is his- hope 

: fof'preveriting, pr minimizing, -the party 

split that could- bring a- tHfqe-pafty br 
fdur-paftyblectibn. , ' .. - 


By boldly asserting his prerogatives;! 
, as' bhairmaaln'brgatiizing' the conven- 
tion, O’Brien -has; taken -on a heavy rtir. 
spqnsibility for bringing the- maj’brity- 
party Into thti election in strotig-enbugh 
cpnditipftto make an-effectlve challenge; 
to Mr. Nixon. . 

there was no vsiay, probably, he 
could avoid being on that fppt, but 
O’Brien seeriis tb be reveling in the foie, 
If he can make the convention one that ' 
strengthens the Democrats, rather than" 
splintering them, he will have capped a. 
quarter-century of unbroken labors fob 
his party with a feat that will merit 
e-ceev Pemipp.ratl.s appreciation n, i m i i.nr.ri.i.' , 


FD-350 (4-3-62) 


(Mount Clipping in Space Below) 


(Indicate page, name of 
newspaper, city and state.) 


{ By ROBERT STULBErA 

Miami News Reporter 4 

•The .executive director.. oi 
the Interama Authority has 
invited leaders of a coalition. , 
of liberal groups here to dis- 
cuss plans, to uSe'Interaina as „ 
a campsite for ncin-delegates 
expected during the July 
Democratic. National Cdhveh- 
tion., ' , 

George Headley, director of i 
the seveh-man state- author- j 
iy',' extended the invitation 1 
this week in a letter to the : 
Miami Snowplow Companyj. 
a ioosely-knit coalition of 22 
groups formed' last month to 

{ •“Trange accommodations for 
le expected crowd ,of i on- 
elegafeS. ■ - 
Snoitvpiow C04 made-up 

|rimatily of ' organlzatiflhs 
. drd'tvh from Ivf iamiis countir- 
wlture, is expecting at lefet 
MiOOO and perhaps as many 
as ibO,o6o protesters and 
dthernoh-delegates. to be; in. 
Dadeieoun^'during thecdn- 
■vention, 

About 4.W0 -weeks ago, Hal 
'Spaet, chairman of the Youth 
: Relations Board and a mem- 
ber of Showpiow, wrote a 
letter to the Interarna Au- 
, thority requesting ah oppor- 
tunity to-meet with the board 
to discuss the use of Inter- 
ama in North Bade. a$ a 
- campsite, 

Yesterday, Spaet disclose il 
tb It Headley,, writing on hi 1 ,- 
hjlf. of the authority, t:^ 's 
week replied to his letteri. iik- 


vifing Showpiow leaders to : 
hfeel with the anthdrilyFebi 
lpor21. . |p, ’ 

JsSpaet said that Headllby- 
TOlained in his lefter tljat - * 
i the interama Authority ‘ 
would not be- able to take / 

the. matter ’foruidlly until 

f arch. - 

But he said that the Inti ra- 
ij la directofc stated that he, 

I j long with-bther memb'en of 
j rae adthortyr, were interasN 
I ed .in the proposal and were’ 

willing td discuss the details 
pffthe plan at a special®‘pfe- 
liifenatymeedng;” ^ , i , 
Bpaet said that Hejkdley 
explained in the ietter;,|‘The 
authority will require a 
• closed iheefing first;. . . at- 


which tintfe it can be deter- 
nsined whether or not Inte«a- 
nla cdn offer suitable spaee,. 


a|cpmm6datiohs, safety, ie- 
djirity and control, and a^o- 
u-hder what conditions, 
-whose; responsibility, and 


0 ^ V, 


whose expense the, project. 

' will be handled;”’ 

He .said' Headley wrote 
that ‘‘I am of the* opinion 
that it woiild be possible to 
dojwhat yoii We ih mind;”' 

' but added, ”1 would have -to 
work out most of the details 
with you before making my 
recommendation ttf. the au- 
thority.”- 

Headley’s comments abdut 
the Snowplow proposal are 
similar to those ^pressed, 
last week by Dr. Elton ‘Gis- 
sehdanne^, pfiairman ,.qf the 
interama' . Authority; who 
told-The MiamlNewsithat iie 
fVouId ‘'wholeheartedly sdp- 
Iport” the project if ‘-‘4e 
Ihing’s going .tor be hahdlM 
■%ht” ' " , \ 

Gissendaiiner said that Ife- 
Ws4tt-|avpr of using Interanm 
, as a campsite if the detbiS 
canbe-wofkediont satisfactik 
riiy. But he said, that since 
; Interama;is state property, <‘I 
wiil.Ieah ijeavlly on the Gov- 
ernor’s office for guidance in 
this matter,”' 

Gissendanner was sched- 
uled to meet with advisers 
to Gov. Reubin Asked today 
to discuss a number of. mat- 
ters pertaining to Interama. 
Gissendanner said' yesterday 
. that he Will probably men- 
tion the Snowplow proposal 
. to them during his disctis- 
■ sions. ' ' 

itesjJndCT the Snownlnw prnJ 

/ Xc.c; C.:;:: 


Initials ...*•• 


MIAMI NEWS 


MIAMI, PLORjTOA 


Date: 2/9/72 
Edition: Blue Streak 


Title: DEMOCRATIC 
NATIONAL CONVENTION, 
' JULY, 1972 


Classification: 

Submitting Office: MIAMI, FLA. 


" EBIC1972 



( 


( 


posal,' the Iftterama site, 
e atea -' en- ' B boitt ;600 ®ea|id^ 
and filled acres of the 
sprawling Graves tract in 
hforth Bade, would lie pop- 
verted’into amppen-air camp- 
site !or the out-of-town visi- 
tors; 

Snowplow leaders' have, 
said; they arehoping portable -1 
toilets,.cah be mstalled'.on the 
site and attached tb existing 
sewage pipes .-there; They 
■have said the^ would dsb' ' 
like to set up portable .field 
.kitchens, on the site .for thft, ' 
' crowds. - j 

Spokesmen for ShowpibW 
have said thal; they would 
■like to secure' . Interama' pr 
Watson Blanditoduse-during 
the cpnventloit primariiy’ber 
pause- both sllpuid- be large 
enough to handlh the expect- 
,ed crowds aiid' are* fairly 
close ' .to Miami Beach Con-- 
vention - Hajh - site, pf the. 
Democratic conventiem. 

Otlwr pites being cohsid- 
e,|ed'.by-the;group are Vplii- 
a : Key BayfrOnt Park ' and 
C ratigny Park- (located! near 
h|iMnpBade d'uriipr. Cd]Iegei : 
nOrthpaftpus). ^ , 




STEPHEN P. CLARK 
Mayor 



METROPOLITAN DADE COUNTY- FLO RIDA 

DADE COUNTY COURTHOUSE 
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33130 


February 4, 1972 



Mr. Kennetb Whittaker 
Special Agent in Charge 
Federal Bureau of Investigation 
P. O. Box 52-157 
Biscayne Annex 
Miami, Florida 33152 

Dear Mr. Whittaker: 

I just wanted to drop you a few lines to let 
you know how much I enjoyed getting together 
X'Tith you on Janu^y 31 at Joe's Stone Crab 

T?pgrgii-r^r af- joHinh f-TTne we discussed the 

up comin^ Cl9Zj^effincrat T n TJgl-f a rt a.1_, Co nvention ^ 
that will convene here July 9-14, 1972. 

Please let me assure you that Dade County is 
behind the efforts of those involved in making 
this convention a successful and peaceful one. 

It is a pleasure to work with you and I do hope 
you will contact me whenever I can be of assistance. 

Kindest regards. 



Stephen P. Clark 


SPCijj 

SEARf'^itD 
SEF;i. L... . 






XT fcr' 


FD-350 (Rev. 7-16-83) 


(Mount Clipping In Space Below) 


mu: 


(Indicate page, name of 
newspaper, city and state.) 


-32-G 


- MI AMI HEHALP, 


-MIAMI, FLORIDA 


t t ^®ubin-AskeW' 'to decide wheth&ftHS 

"ii6ff:.delegates’’ to,the-&m-= 
' 2?^ Convention to camp on Interama land- i)r 

Eltow-Gissendanner said'Erida^. • • — ■ > 

tl?e''Principfe-of the'idea.” the&tera- 
m 'Authority chairman said; ’ib'ut certainly there* wouldMve 

thP-Inn ® worked put Before we dould'S 

the-600 orsD'a'creSover to -caffipers.’l! . • ' ' 

10,000-20,000 youthful visitors 
nere tor the July Oigonvention Be; acpommodated on the va- 

• ttan'yn’f Miami came from Harof Ipaet lal- 
man of Dade County’s. Youth ’Relations .Soard, 

said complete proposal,’* Gisseiidanner 

1.> ^ <m to,the governor’s office. Iherenre gues- 

Sjup aSa^^^^ the-cpsfa of clean, 

a*cohfrohtatiori.such,as I 

^id '‘We ^® ^™oi”’the'chairman 

ff5l might evenigo so far as to find some down-thesbay 
•fWteiJa^nsportation. from Iriterama Conventioh.Hall; just 
to;keepthemvoffthe'Streets.” ’ 


Date: 2/5/72 


Title: DEMOCRATIG 
NATIONAL CONVENTION 

Character: 

or 

Classification I 80-1353 

Submitting Office* ii/r*v th'v l 

MIAMI, PLA, 

I I Being Investlgoted 





In Reply, Please Refer to 
File No. 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 
Washington, D. C. 

February 10, 1972 


NATIONAL welfare RIGHTS 
organization (NWRO) 


On February 8, 1972, a confidential source, who 
has provided reliable information in the past, advised as 
follows : 


A meeting of the Executive Board and National 
Coordinating Committee of the National Welfare Rights 
Organization (NWRO) was held at the Dodge House Hotel in 
Washington, D. C., during the period February 4-6, 1972. 

Forty-five persons were present and this included 
two (2) American Indians, about six (6) whites and the 
remainder who were black. Eighteen (18) states and the 
District of Columbia were represented as follows: 


Arkansas 
New York 
Wiscons in 
Missouri 
Ohio 

Pennsylvania 
Maryland 
Rhode Island 
Massachusetts 
Michigan 





tr' tr^ 


national welfare rights 
organization 


Nevada 
California 
Virginia 
West Virginia 
Connecticut 
Mississippi 
New Jersey 
Indiana 

Washington, D. C. 


follows ; 


National officers of the NI^^RO present were as 





All of the main functions of the meeting were held 
in the Capitol Room of the Dodge House Hotel and almost all 
of those attending the meeting resided at this hotel while 
in Washington. 

Activities - February 4, 1972: 


conducted by |_ 


Th e first meeting began at 9:00 a.m. , and was 


Almost the entire 


morning was spent discussing why the meeting was changed from 
the Virgin Islands to Washington, D. C. After much discussion 
and confusion, it was announced that the change was apparently 
effected as many thought it would be too expensive to attend 
in the Virgin Isla.nd. The meeting was adjourned for lunch be 
with nothing accomplished. t>7c 

At 1:30 p.m. , in t he afternoon, February 4>, 1972, 
the session was conducted by 


She discussed the duties of a member of 
the National Coordinating Committee and the overall structure 
of the NWRO. Thenl ~ I who was on the NWRO staff. 


gave a brief outline of the current bill that is soon to be 


3 




national welfare rights 
organization 


passed by Congress concerning the Family Assistance Plan 
(FAP) . This session terminated at 5:30 p.m. 

On the evening of February 4, 1972, the various 
regions represented, central, eastern, western and southern, 
each held separate meetings to discuss a proposal for a 
Children's March to be held in Washington, D. C., on 
March 25, 1972. 


Activities - February 5, 1972: 


On the morning of February 5, 1972, the meeting 
.consisted of two parts. One was preparing a letterhead 
memorandum rega rding the Children's March under the 
cha irraanship .°.C 
was conducted by 


be 

b7C 


The second session 
and he was critical of the groups ' 


failure to get down to business and outline a calendar for the 
next session's activities. He noted that on March 16, or 
March 17, 1972, there would be a "children's hearing" regarding 
welfare before Congress. He wanted the Children's March to 
be held on March 25, 1972, at Washington, D. C., and the 
marchers would consist of children of welfare mothers. 


Saturday afternoon, February 5, 1972, consisted of 
primarily reports from the regional meetings that were held 
on the previous evening. 


The eastern region reported that they feel most 
of -the children for the Children's March will come from 
their area due to their proximity to Washington, D. C., and 
they feel accordingly, they should be responsible for 
arranging transportation to get the children to Washington 
from surrounding areas. The central region reported that they 
fully support the march and were considering a similar program 
in their areas . 



• • 

national welfare rights 
organization 


The southern region indicated that they supported 
the Children’s March and would discuss it further at a 
Southern Regional Meeting to be held at the Town and Tourist 
Motel in Columbia, South Carolina, during February 17 - 20, 
1972. 


The western region said they also would support 
the Children's March and would be doing something "at home" 
the same time the march would be going on in Washington, 

D. C. Source noted that the regional representative for the 
western region who made this report was from California, city 
not known. 


i 


Saturday's meeting broke up around 6:00 p.m. , 


follox'jing which there was a staff and Executive Board 
meeting, following which a party was planned for 9:00 p.m. 
The Executive Board meeting did not go v ery well because 


1 fromi 1 


got into a fight with 


1 The fight 

involved quite a bit ot 


pushing and shoving; however, it was broken up before it was 
necessary to call the police. be 


Activities - February 6, 1972 


of 


A meeting was held on Sunday under chairmanship 


from Newport News , 


Virginia. The Executive Board presented a proposal that the 
summer conference of NWRO would be held in Miami, Florida, 
and that a main event at this conference would be some type 
of disruptive action in connection with the Democratic 
Convention to be held in Miami in July, 1972. This proposal 
w^as agreed upon by all those present at this meeting whicfT 


was under the chairmanship oi 


It was 


announced there would possibly be more details regarding this 
possible disruption of the Democratic Convention in forth- 
c oming mon t hs . . 


5 



national mFARE RIGHTS 
organization 


Source noted that it was evident throughout the 
weekend that the M-JRO, as an organization, is experiencing 
serious internal and financial problems. There was a 
considerable amount of internal dissension and fighting 
throughout the meeting and it was’ difficult for anything 
to be accomplished. It was announced that the National 
Staff Officers would probably not be paid for the current 
week due to lack of funds. Delegates from Nev? York x^ere 
very vocal in stating that they have been the primary support 
financially of the NVTRO. Due to their disagreement with 
national officers on several key issues, they are considering 
withdrawing any financial support for operating the M-ifRO 
nationally. Source noted that NWRO newspaper, the Welfare 
Fighter is still published but only very infrequently, 
apparently due to a lack of funds. 

Source stated that the general consensus is that 
■ no one knows what to expect when going to a NWRO meeting 
and at these meetings everyone wants to "be the leader." 
Source noted that there was no extremist activities or any 
known national extremists observed in attendance at any 
of the functions of this meeting. 

The next National Coordinating Committee meeting 
is to be held in May, 1972, at a presently unknown location. 

This document contains neither recommendations nor 
conclusions of the FBI. It is the property of the FBI and is 
loaned to your agency; it and its contents are not to be 
distributed outside your agency. 


FD-35 (Rev. 5-22-64) 


• • 

F B I 

Date: 2A0/72 


(Type in plaintext or code) 

AIRMAIL 

(Priority) 


TO: DIRECTOR, FBI (157-8813) 

FROM: SAC, JACKSON (157-9032) (P) 

national welfare RIGHTS 
ORGANIZATION (N\^0) 

EM 

00: WFO 

Enclosed for the Bureau are the original and 7 
copies of an LHM regarding mmO National Coordinating 
Committee meeting held at the Dodge House Hotel, Washington, 

D. C., 2/4-6/72. Two copies of LHM enclosed for other offices 
as noted on copy count as perti.nent information of interest 
to these offices reflected in enclosed LHM. 


Confidential source mentioned in LHM is 



J 

Transmit the following in 
V(n AIRTEL 


Bureau (Enc. 8) (157-8813) (RFI) 
Boston (Enc. 2) (RM) 

Chicago (Enc. 2) (RM) 
Cincinnati (Enc. 2) (RM) 
Columbia (Enc. 2) (RM) 

Los Angeles (Enc. 2) (RM) 

-Miami (Enc. 2) (RM) 

Newark (Enc. 2) (RM) 

New York (Enc. 2) (RM) 

Norfolk (Enc. 2) (RM) 
Pittsburgh (Enc. 2) (&N) 

WFO rEnc. 2^ (RlM 


TF:cbw 

(27) 

Approved: 



FEB 141972 

FBI — 


Sent 



-M Per 


Special Agent in Charge 


GPO ; X970 O - 402-735 



JN 157-9032 
LEADS : 


MIAMI DIVISION 


Arp T>r-rA^.rT nOTTATTV'^ PT OD TI'lA 


Advised local authorities regarding possibility 
of W7RO demonstrations at the Democratic Convention in July, 
1972. 


WASHINGTON FIELD OFFICE 
At WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Alert local authorities regarding Nl^TRO Youth March 
to be held in that city March 25, 1972. 

OTHER recipient OFFICES 

Review enclosed LHM and index names appropriate to 
respective division. 

JACKSON DIVISION 

AT 

Will follow subsequent developments with 

b7D 



2 




FD-350 (Rev. 7-16-63) 


‘i. 


(Mount Clipping In Space Below). 



Mofjdety,: an* innQvertive- law' enforcement project 
trdiningMor police officers for the. 
•1-972 I^mcser'atie Ngtiondl 'Gonyention will feegim- 
4®^*.'; project is et joint effort of the Miami Beach 
Police Depaf,tment cmd Florida, fntemcitronal Uni 


• Pr. James":^e*e6^3e is (liigm 
man of the Grimineil Justice Pio' 
gram, which 5s a part of the 
Schooi of Health an^ .Social Serv: 
ices at Florida International. 

; fPhis University, which vidU open 
for approximately ,5,000. students-j 
‘ this; September, has been involved- 
in eommunity servica and offrcanr-, 

' pus educational programs for ovefj 
, a year; 

I Pointing- to this themei ©r. 
Perry said the current, project 
"wiE link teaching vidth, service 
and. bring the- classroom, where' the; 
need is;" 

Before the estimated ISjOOO. 
Bei|iocrats. arid coriventlon dele- 
gates. arrive in .the summer,! Hane- 
■Wicz— working mth Chief Pomer- 
ance’s, command: staff ,which pro- 
vided law enforcement service^ to 
the 1908 National Republican Con- 
, vention at Miami Beach— will have 
trained the- officers in crowd psy- 
chology, philosophy of dissent, arid 
conflict management. 

. Harieivicr said he plans to pre- 
pare the- officers for a wide vari- 
ety of experiences., His emphasis;. 
■wUl be- upon the preventive’ and 
protective fples officers must as- 
sume. 

Commenting upon his* assign-^ 
ment, Professor Hanewicz' said! 
that "we-'re concerned with the; 
preservation of the basic rights- of | 
freedom. * 


Planning cir.the ”trajnirig project 
has, ;been -uhdeh way since last 
Noveinheh, when the Pollen pe- 
'the commmid o£| 
Pohee Chief Rocky Pomerance, 
received p * grant of $395,424 to 
prepare police (Officers for the July 
convehtjoii, ' ' 

Comihentihg on the graht,; Chief 
Eoiperaiice said thgt “90 per -cent 
of the grant is;, devoted, .to; educa- 
tlori;,-and' training, and innovative 
comriiumcahoh, techniques,’’ ' 
"fhe 'grahtTT-the'- first o£,its; Hnd 
—was approved November S, 1971 , 
by the Ba'w Enfofcemeht Assist- 
ance Aamiriistration’- of the U S' 

. Department, otjpstice., , j’ 

sfiehtag. .session .wm- begin 
■' 1 'February 1^1 

m the Cypress Room of Cohveri- 
faoh Hall- Scheduled to speak are 
©r,.:Charies E. Periy, President of 
Florida rritefriatiorial', CMef Eom- 
‘>ther.;qity(.and county 

Wayne B. Hanewlcz,| 
of Flond'a Interiiatlonai’S Criihin-I 
f .Program,, will direct the 
■project Hanewicz, who holds s 
B.S. degree in. police administra- 
tion and M;s. in criminal justice 

State University,, and has done 
doctoral work in political phUoso- 
Phy, formerly directed the erhn- 

otl program at Montana 

State University. 

He also served as Planning Pi- 
rector of the .Southwestern Wis- 
consin Regional Law Enforcement 
Plannmg Commission arid as Re- 

search Ang,IysS fOC the Wlsconslni 

Gouncil on Criminal Justice; 


(Indicate page, name of 
newspaper, city and state.) 


2 - A 

MIAMI BEACH TIMES 
HIALEAH, FLORIDA 


2 / 11/72 

Edition; 

Author: 

Editor: 

DEMOCRATIC 
jNATiONAL CONVENTION 

Character; 

or 

Classification: 80-1353 
Submitting Offloe:'MIAMI , FLA . 
I I Being Investigated 


g |lj:n. 

. : ■ 




■«, ' 


( 


"Oiie of tiiese rig hts is that of 
the delegates to Assemble and. 
select a candidate, a right that is 
critical to our democratic' and' 

pnlltTosrl Tirof»PR«;p«? 

“This reqiuires' informed and sen^ 
sitive law enforcement That is 
the goal of our program.’’ 

Speaking of the program and its 
aims, Chief Pohierance- said it will-, 
help "provide for effective>and hu- 
mane policing on the highest 
level.” 

Regular weekly classes, in. te- 
, i^or,.- legal and teghnical tre(3 1- ^ 
' ng will he^n Saturday, Februai y 
19. Attending the ■ 96 hours it ; 
-classroom work wUl he the 250- ' 
person Miami. Beach poliofe force, t 
and key middle-management of- 
ficers. from variousK other ‘Dade* 
County Police Departments^ 

■Ihe classroom 'work will be held 
each weekend, in three four-hour, 

: sessions, through Sunday, June 18,' 
as follows: Sa.turday-r*8 a.m- to 12; 
noon, and 4 pm. to 8 pm.; Sun- 
, day— 11 a.m. to 2 pan. The-stagr.- 
■gered sessidhs wiU allow regular 
police shiffe t'e continue. 

In preparing the project, vari- 
ous. planning sessions have- been' 
held. The last session,, on January 
,'2i,. was. .attended by behavioral 
scientists,, educators, law enforce- 
ment xepresentatiYes and dthefS 
from around the nation'. They ii» 
eluded: 

Professor Robert Shellow, CeriT 
ter for Hrhan: Studies' .Carhe^e- 
Meiloh lustitute, Pittsburgh;’ Dr.; 
-Harvey Longett, Assistant Profes- 
sor Psychiatry,- -Hniversity of 
Florida; John Angell, administra- 
tive assistant teJ the Chief of 
Poliee^ Dasrton, Ohio; John Karsh' 
of the Research and; Planning TJnit 
Federal Bteeau of Investifationi 
Training . bivisipn, iyashington;- 
Johri P. Adarris, Director, Depart-. 
meht of Law, Justice and Com-; 
inunity Relation, 'United; Melhod- 
ist Fellowship; Jack O. Gassiday, 
Minister of Metropolitan Mission, 
United ChiBwi|F“^ef* Christ; Dr. 


! Leonard Ha ber. . nsv^ ologist: pr. 
Park -Fitzhugh, Director, Law En- 
forcement Rrograni, .Center for 
Urban Studies, University of 

Mrs. Colleen Ericson, Instructors - 
in the Schoolof Education, Florida 
i International; Seymour' Gelber;. ; 
'Administrative Assistant to State 
Attorney Richard Gersteiil; and ; 
Jom Qross, Christian Community’ 
iS.ervice Agency. 

After- the cohvention is over;; ‘ 
■there will.be intensive -post evaluar- 
tipn sessions, which will inphidi- 
ah -eyaiuatioh of the methodology, 
utilized and publication of appro- ; 
priate material^ .according to Pro- 
’ fessof'Hanewi cj. 


FD-3S0 (Rev. 7-16-63) 


I 


( 


(Mount Clipping in Space Below) 




A spbkesmap for the Miami 
Beach. Police Dep^ment 
said today Beach pdiice are ■ 
honing to arrange “demon- 
strations by appointment’* 
for dissident groups expected 
during the Democratic Na- 
tional, Convention thiS’ sum-, 
mer-. , ‘ ' 

In ah interview with the 
Miami News, Capt. Ozzie' 
itruidenier, the officer in 
charge of security arrange- 
rhents for the- July conven- ■ 
tiom said his office would 
like to he able “to plan to 
some degree”, where and 
when demonstrations will be ; 
held. 

“We will havg a space set . 
iside‘iOUt'side the Gohventib t 
lall to iiandld large number : 

: If demonsWaoril’^ KM 
;r said, “hud we^ll have cah»' 
iras, platforms and all set up 
. right by the demonstration 
site so the protests will get 
exposure^’ 

“We're just hoping thatwe 
can keep lines of communica- 
tlons open with these ' 
iiroups,” he said. “We hopl 
' hey’ll tel l us ab out their 

ilans . . ^We can help them, . 
3lan it.” i 

KmWenier said last week 
that Beach police will set 
aside two lots “each the size 
of a football field” in front of 
the Beach Convention Hall 
for demonstrations. 


, limit thel5inffiif”of partici* , 
’ pants. 

i ’“We wouldtiit stop a spon- 
taneous demonstration,, but 
. would try to help them, esr ^ 
cort them,” thecaptain saidi 
Kr.uldenier said he believes 
that most demonstrators in- 
tend to do so in a, non-vio- 
: lent manner. 

( “These people are nol 
hmlng down Td '“fight g6| 
ice,” He said; ; “They’re coml 
ing Sown to mpRe a point; to 
, make thein.presence felt . . . 
Welre not gding to heep 
these people front coming 
over.” 

Kruidenier 'made his com-’ ' 
ments after attending a- 
^ meeting of the Miami Show- 
' plow ed.,, a newly-formed co.- 
alitidn of liberal groups set 
up to arrange accommbda- 
, tionsfbr protesters and dther 
non-delegates expected dur- 
ing-the conyention. 

I Representatives of Miami 
Snowplow have predicted 
that from 10,000 to- 100,000' 
o=u:t-o f-town. v isitors will 
_eoi^to Miamiin* July. 


(Indicate page, name of 
newspaper, city and state.) 


5 -A 


MIAMI NEWS 


MAMI, FLORIDA 


2/14/72 

Edition! 

Author: 

Editor: 

DEMOCRATIC 
NATIONAL CONVENTION 

Character: 

or 

Classification: 80—1353 
Submitting OffloeMIAMI , FLA . 

I I Being Investigated 


But he said Beaclj police 
will not attempt to break up, 
spontaneous ’“’"pWlS®, or 






FD-350 (Hev. 7-16-63) 


(Mount Clipping in Space Below) 



Yippie Leader Jerry Rubin; ‘ 
told University of Miami sta- ' 
dents Monday it -would be’ , 
possible to get as many aS 
SOiOOO people to demonstrate 
in Miami during tbe Demo- 
cratic convention tHis-sum- : 
mer and “thenrgo all the way , 
do San Diego.” 

Rubin, leader of -the -Youth 
International Party, told 350 , 
tJM students, they ■ couii 
malte history in many ways, 
“by having the Democratic . 
■convention in* your city.” 

He' said he enjoyed; bemg " ; 
inPlorida and “would like to 
’■ 'Organfee' the; (Yippie) party 
here,” 

, Found guilty irt February 
1970 of ihciting'to riot at the 
' 1968 Democratic National : 
Convention, ' Rhbih . blasted ; 
the U.S. political, economic 
and educational’ systems. and 
said the only candidate -for 
president he copld support is 
; Shirley Chisholm. 

, Last October,, Rubin said' 
Yippie protesters would '“de- 
feat Nixon in 1972 like we 
■ helped defeat Humphrey in 
,1968.” He later vowed that 
the Republican National Con- ' 
ventiOn will be the scene of 
the biggest 'demohstration in 
a decade bilrtfflrB'ffpeacBful. 



{Indicate page, name of 
newspaper, city and state.) 


13 -A 


MIAMI HERALD 


MIAMI, FLORIDA 


2/15/72 

Edition: 


DEMOCRATIC 
NATIONAL CONVENTION 

Ch'aractef: 

or 

Classification: 80-1353 
Submirnug Office: MIAMI , FLA. 

I I Being Investigated 




1 / .. 

j 


FD-350 (Rev. 7-16-63) 


(Mount Clipping in Space Below) 




■fl 

EK 



E! 

m 


(Indicate page, name of 
newspaper, city and state.) 


22-A 


j! BjrTRED TASKER 
HsraldSfalfWritw 

^ A request by Metro Youth 
‘ ^Relations Board Chairman 
, Hal Spaet for $6,500 to set 
Up an office to coordinate 
housing, food and crowd-con- 
trol help for youthful “non 
delegates” to the July Demo- 
cratic National. Corivention 
was,, turned dovyh by Metro 
commissioners Tuesday. 

"WeYe probably going to 
have a great -deal of young 
; people -Here- ‘.t6.':dem6nstrate ‘ 
id some way,” Spaet told 'the 
commissioners,* 

“SOMEflQW, we’Ve got to- 
•prepare the, area for the com^ 
ing of these people.- We’ve 
gpt tpJJhake sure their activi- 
ties, as 'long as they’re ;law- 
Ivfl, . are as harffiohiou^> as 
possible w|th the; communi- 
ty,” he said.' ■ - • ' 

,; “T appreciate yopr mo- 
tives/” 'Copiriiissionei# ^arvey 
Reiseinan ■said, '301 .undue 
publicity' itf the prjss adi:o 
w^tyou’re. doing to feed, 
i ^ss and give ml^ital ck^ 
i tft®se people seems to me , 
j'to . imply an ihvltatipn, td-- 
/ have great numbers of , n0n4<- 
r '' delegateS'hereJ’ 



i Hal Spaet • 

. . ^.losex bi$ 

Spaetniade the request on , 

I hehair oF Operation Miami 
Snowplow, an association' of 
35-. local civic . and; geverm- ' 
mental groups preparing for. 

' a youthfuD invasion • during 
the convention. 


MIAMI HERALD 


MIAMI , FLORIDA 


Date: 2/16/72 

Edition: 

Author: 

Editor: 

Title: DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL 
eONSENTION 

Chc/racter: 

or 

Classl fica tion : 80-1353 -Vf' 

Submitting OfflceJIIAMI , FLA , 

I I Being Investigated 


(Indicate page, name of 
newspaper^ city and state.) 


Ir® 

m&m HERALD 
MAMI FLORIDA 


bate: 2/15/72 

Edition: 


Authoc: 

Editor: 

Title: 


DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL 
' CONVENTION 

Character: 


Class! ficatioh : 80-1353 

Submitting OfficeMIAMI ^ FLA , 


1 I Being Investigated 




“if we make a mistake in enminal in^^estigatieii 
we lose tke case. If you make one mistake in the area 
of human lelations you pan lose a city.” 

-r^Pttul Rundlbi 
Head of convention Secret Service force 


Miami Beach and Greater Miami police began a 
pre-convention training . prograrn Monday amid warn- 
, ings that “one mistake in. the area of human rela- 
tions, . and you can ’lose ai city;” 

^ The federally funded ,^39^424 .program -is de-- 
signed to.' prepare the officers for an onslaught of 
more than SOjO'OO-pefsons gathering for the July .9' 
Democratic hominating convention. 

. And some of thosg.comirig, a party official Said-, 
•may not he wishing ,us well.” 

■ ®iA^ING'Ot|RlNG the .96 hours of classroom 
. work, which will be -conducted over the' next 18 
weekends will be in the hands of Fldrida IptCmation- 
el University professors- and will be-aimed'at kinging 
“the totich needed '.Understanding;- that- is required., 
between -the poHcerhan-arid the, average,', 'atld nof-so- 
average citisen,’.’ according .to Fltf president Charles- 
E, 'Perry.- ' . " , 

P,kl.yundle, whQ wilfheaddhegovenimerit’sSe- 
'force' here during the convention -period, 
told officers ;at .the introductory session at Miami 

Beach.gonvehtion Hall: ‘ | 

I ‘If we niake a -inistahe in' criminal", investigatioril 


Jvve.iose the case. If youmak'e onemistake in the ardk’ 
w human relations, you, can lose a d.ty.” ‘ . 

Ricked J. Murphy, the. ESemocrafs’ convention 
■ manager and chairman pf arrangements, said the 
• party was determined not to have .a repeat df the dis- 
'.ruptive and violent demonstrations which .niarred its 
: 1968'meetmg-at'Ghicago. 

Briefing the .officer? as to. -what they can expect 
, l athe way -of crowds, Murphy said; 

I n 


Hfee will- be 3i000 delegates and 2,000 alter-^ 
nates: more than 7,200 members of the news media;.’ 
60 senators, 30 governors and over 2O0 congressmen, 

: ,plus=a. multiiude''Of 9fficials,5from .the .50' slates.- 
! 15,000,'.” he said, ’“cari' get in Gon- ’ 

I mention Hall, 'ttere .will be many more thousandspf ' 

; 'Visitors coming to the Beach just for the fug of it, 

; ahd'som? demonstrating groups many -of them not ‘ 

^®shi^g;us!well.” 

' I 'Rdndie told , the police 'the Secret SeHich wohl41 


Aoh-ba'nd Mto guard the,bqdies”'of the.majqr>candi| 
, dates. 4Brihg the coriyention-, “but law 'dn'd .Order af 
' the convention complex and throughout the city is in . 

, yourh'adds;" - ^ it . 

Murphy said the Democrats wefe coming, to ; 

• MiamiBeach'withbhree major ponventiomobjectives. ‘ 

-Tirstvwe'want.peace ahd tfanguility in the City; i 
•• 'second, adordferly Cohveatibnby thedeiegaiBs.thera- ^ 
; selves; sokhat we, may seriously .deliterate themat- 
, ters before us, and third. We 'waiit to •permit every 
' group'.ahd.evefy person-.to- express bis .views, includr 
ingpCaceful dissentv.so that we may protect Ourcivil 
•lihefties;’/ ‘ _ 

Recognizing that only a; limitedmumber ,of .per- 
sons cdmilig' tO' Miami Beach can be admitted to -fte 
actual-pfqceedings, 'Muiphysaid .the Demqcrais 'wefa- 
.planning a diversified. program of morning .eriteftaid" 

• fnent arid meetings at tbs' Convention Hall -which 
only “nondelegates” can attend. 

THERE be program? for women, labor 
urii.da representatives, -ffle blacks .-arid the ijatins ~ 
-even rock music -.concefts and riances fof’ the young” 
people;” J^utphy said. 




PREFACE to Page 1 

Herewith submitted is a revised application for the Grant of Discretionary 
funds under the project titled "National Political Convention Law Enforcement 
Services Project." 

Our original Grant application was submitted to the Florida State Planning 
Agency in April 1971. A series of modifications and resubmissions have ensued. 
Precious time has been consumed during this process and we are now faced with 
a time factor which demands accelerated action in all areas of this undertaking. 

The initially enormous responsibilities in providing security for the 
Democratic National Political Convention, the Platform Hearings, and related 
meetings of some 5,000 official delegates and representatives continues to 
burgeon with added demands for police services of the most sophisticated sort. 

This proposal has within its compass, not only the highly necessary 
training of participating police officers but also meaningful research, equip- 
ping evaluation and documentation with regard to the most contemporary methodo- 
logy and the application of police services. 

The complex law enforcement problems which will be encountered will present 
the most difficult of challenges under circumstances having great national and 
international significance. 




r 




B.O.B. Ko. b}.RO(i72 
1-30-7S) 

(Editton 12>30«69) 

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

enforcement assistance 

ADMINISTRATION 

application FOR GRANT 
DISCRETIONARY FUNDS 
PAGE 1 

Appllcitlon 1i hereby sadt for • Qrant under Section XK 
of the Omnibus Crlnte Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 
(PL 90*351) In the amount and for the purposes set forth In 
this application. 

(LEAVE tLANK.IUH 

Aliplietttan Nunbtr 

OFUCIAl USE OHLVJ 
ProgrtH Olvltlon Atsigntd 

Date Received 

Revlon Assigned 


SKort Title of Prt>Ject:Tbo r>oi txceed ont tjrptd line) 


National Political Convention Law Enforcement Services Project 

^7 Of Appiic»t1on: (Check One) 

VV Hevtsion Continuation of 6r>nt Ho» 


DUcretlontry Pro^rtM Under Which Application Is 

1971 DF Program D--Large City/County Special Grants 


4. Project Duration: -i j- 

Total Lenoth 1 0 wnths 

5. LEAA support Sought: 

» 395,424.00 

Applicant or Implementing Agency or Govcrnnental Unit: 
(Naiee, AddresSg and telephone} 

Police Department 

City of Miami Beach Florida 

120 Meridian Ave., 33139 
. Fxt. 462 

7. Project Director (Hane, title, addressi and telephone) 

To be Selected 


9. official Authorized to Sign Application (hane. title* 
address* end telephone) 

Clifford W. O' Key, City Manager 
1130 Washington AvenUe 

Important parts of the statement of project plan presented 

Accounting Sijpervisor 

1130 Washington Avenue 
Miami Beach, Florida 33139 
534-7511, Ext. 462 

)6« Project Sunnary* - •simurfteg in approxinately 209 uordi, the «os 


In (ppHcntton Um 22 (nge 6), briefly covering project goels end progrin Mtliods. tvpect, scope, end eviluitlon. 


The purpose of this proposal is to train and equip law entorcement 
officers in the handling of a National Political Convention. 

This project will research and document requirements for law en- 
forcement services during National Political conventions. It will 
concern itself with the recognition, evaluation and control of 
individuals and groups who pose a threat to the orderly conduct of 
convention proceedings, the general welfare of the community and 
the personal safety of delegates and candidates. 

Key personnel and operational procedures of agencies providing 
services during prior political conventions will be consulted. 
Innovative techniques in conflict management developed by police 
departments will be analyzed. 

Emphasis will also be given to evaluation and acquisition of on- 
site communications, non-lethal control systems, surveillance and 
identification procedures, and equipment. 

(see continuation sheet) 


\ 


■bo 

b7C 


Continuation Sheet -- Page 1, Item 10 


Following the research and documentation set forth above, in-depth 
training curricula will be developed and implemented to upgrade the 
abilities of all local law enforcement personnel who will participate 
in providing convention security. Equipment which has been acquired 
will be introduced into local operational convention procedures, in 
accordance with the most effective and promising methodology developed 
by our research. 

The final phase of this project will document and review all preceding 
stages, up to and including law enforcement services performed during 
the 1972 National Political Convention. Dissemination of the docu- 
ments generated, will be made in accordance with LEAA recommendation. 




PORM LEAA-OLHP‘6-0 
(Edition 1t/l8/70) 



e.O.B. NO. 43-R0472 
(Appr. exp. 1/30/76) 


United States Department of Justice 

LAW ENFORCEMENT ASSISTANCE 
ADMINISTRATION 

APPLICATION FOR GRANT - Page 1 
DISCRETIONARY FUNDS 

Pcogiam D 



1 (LEAVE BLANK'FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY) 

Application t& hereby made for a grant under Section 306 
of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 

APPLICATION NUMBER 

PROGRAM DIVISION ASSIGNED 

forth in this application 

DATE RECEIVED 

region assigned 


t. SHORT JITI.£ OF PROJECT(S): (Do not OMcend one typod line) 

National Political Convention Law Enforcement, Services Pro.iect 

2. TVPE OF APPLICATION: (Chock Ono) 

im ORIGINAL REVISION I ! CONTINUATION OF GRANT NO. 

3. DISCRETIONARY PROGRAM UNDER WHICH APPLICATION IS MADE: 


1971 DF Progrem D— Large City/County Special Grants 


4. PROJECT DURATION; 

1 ^ 

Total length > ^ months 

5. LEAA SUPPORT SOUGHT: ^ 

e..395^424.._00 

6. applicant or implementing AGENCY OR GOVERNMENTAL UNIT: 
(Namo, address* end telephone) 

Police Department 
City of Miami Beach 
120 Meridian Avenue 
Miami Beach, Florida 33139 
534-7511, Ext. 212 

7. PROJECT DIRECTOR (Name. tula, address, and telephona) 

To be Selected 


9. OFFICIAL AUTHORIZED TO SIGH APPlICATlON 
(Name, title, addrnss. and tel>tohun<;) 

Clifford W. O' Key, City Manager 
1130 Washington Avenue 
Miafhi Beach* Florida 33l39 
534-7511, Ext. 411 

Accounting Supervisor 

iiiiU Washington Avenue be 
Miami Beach, Florida 33139 b7c 
534-7511, Ext. 462 

10. ELIGIBILITY CATEGORY: (Check appropriate box) 

L ^City with population in excess of 200,000 

r . Jcountv with population in excess of 600.000 , 

r Icity over SO.CXK) with Model Cities fund eligibility 
r "*lc»ty over 75.000 with specified high crime index 
CZDiargest city in State not otheiwise eligible 
[123 City or County with Special crime problem 

n. ESTIMATED PROJECT FUNDING: Federal Matching Total 

Protect mi ... _ _ . . 

Total 

12. APPLICATION attachments* iCheck appropriate boxes) 

1 1 Attachment A • Description of Overall improvement Plan 

Attachment B • Descnpt.on of Each Project to be Supooned bv 
OF Grant 

1 1 Attachment C • State Planning Agencv Certification ants 

Endorsement 

15. Ooos the agencv accept and umloitake to comply, if o grer>t 
IS awarded, with the LEAA Grant Conditions and the proorarn 
specifications for the Largo C>ty/Cuuniy Special Grants 
program (1971 Discrettonary Qram Guide, p. DF 23)t 

13. DATE: 14..^riTr^ PAGES IN APPLICATION; 

Oct. 8, 1971 41 

yesF^I 

t6. SIGNATURE OF AuTHOffiZEO OFFIC^^iA (See item 9 of Application): 

TITLE: / L / y^/ yf /! /j y Clifford W. O' Key, City Manager 



OF 171 



form IfM-ollP-s (RfvUKl) 

''•Ji’-" '^-30-691 



U. S. OrPAklMENI OF JUSTICE 
LAW ENFORCEMENT ASSISTANCE 
ADMINISTRATION 


APPLICAT ION FOR GRANT 
DISCRETIONARY FUNDS 
PAGE 2 


11- DETAILED PROJECT BUDGET-- include the estlMted cott or value of all ravourcet tvecessary to undertake 

the project. 


inn »SM .T » | .|.rttliMJ » I ’ J ' M J 13 ■ l iM-: Uf l .» ' ■■ I' I ' MC! '] 


reject Director (15 mos.) 100% 0 $20,000. annual 


ecfetanai \io mos; luux annua 


part-timed 5 weeks) $378. bi-weekly 


42048. 


12384. 


ng sessions 


84328.' 35000. 




once & Clerical Ketirement & insurance 


[■wiiinpnipmw-'ngirrMtiGaf 

I Iin ■ tmm I ill I I'MM ! ■ I \ 


4600. 


rvice Orgtntiitloni 4nd AssOCt«tiOni 


nt devoted} 


earn i ravel (I9 Individual Trips 
Tnstructors 
Consultants 


Local I rave I cars Tor 
$195. mo. rental plus 4i per mile over t 


oTograpnic 


vision 




MM WllINhhBTii iaiBiMgnr 


Office Space $5250. , Telephones $1175., Offic e 
Eq pt . costs $3350, Document, Purchase & Printin 


Classroom Re 


•cnwii 


imm 


































12. BUDGET NARRATIVE 


B»,ln b.lo. .nd .dd »ny contlnodtlon p<«« (3d. 3b. tte.) dt -y b» rydtMry to rtldU tho ItdK hud,dtdd to orojtct .ctivttt.j. 

•nd coMipWte th« r«<^utr#d Justlftcitloo •*pl«n»tiwof th« project budptt. 

Bu(jqet Narrative 
A. Personnel (Empi oyees ) 

(1) Salaries 

Project Director 15 months (100%) at $20,000. per annum (LEAA Support 
$25,000.) (To be selected) 

A full-time Project Director will be necessary for this program. 
Qualifications required of the Director include a background in law 
enforcement or related government service, at the executive or ad- 
ministrative level. Successful experience in the areas of research, 
advanced and vocational education, and operational planning will be 
expected. The ability to make in depth evaluation and full documenta- 
tion will be required. 

Assistant Project Director (2) 15 months (100%) at $21,504 and $20,544. 
per annum respectively each. (Grantee Contribution $42,048.)^ 
Full-time Assistant Project Directors will be needed to maximize 
the opportunity for research and operational planning contained 
within the terms of this project. The Assistant Project Directors^ 
will be Police Captains who will be detached for 100% project utili- 
zation. One will be selected on the basis of field operational ex- 
perience in Uniform and Patrol functions; the other by virtue of 
investigative and intelligence background, thus providing an input 
to the Project Director concerning specialized local law enforce- 
ment expertise in the major areas of operations. 

The Assistant Project Directors will have a five-fold role: 

(a) To assist the Project Director. 

(b) To conduct field interviews and research under the 
guidance of the Director. 

(c) To relate findings to local resources and problems. 

(d) To assist the Director in drafting operational plans 
and training curricula. 

(e) To assist the Director in the evaluation and dcrcumenta- 
tion of research products, training and execution of 
operational planning generated within the project. 


DF 15 



- Page 3a - 







Secretav'ial 

One (1) (100%) 15 months at $9,276. per annum - $12,384. 

One (1) 15 weeks @ $378. bi-weekly - $2,835. 

For secretarial, clerical, receptionist and stenographic work, a full- 
time secretary is necessary. Local labor market cost of $9,276. is quoted. 

This individual will handle the dictation, typing, filing, telephone answering, 
and other routine administrative clerical duties. 

A part-time secretary will be heeded for three (3) five-week periods at a 
cost of $378. bi-weekly. This person will assist in the stenographic and 
duplicating work necessary to produce the initial research reporting, lesson 
plans and training outlines, operational guides and final project documentation. 
Police Personnel $119,328. 

200 Officers x 96 hours @ $5.65 - 40 Officers x 48 hours @ $5.65 

($84,328. LEAA Support - $35,000. Grantee Contribution) 

Compensation will be paid to 200 local off-duty police personnel at their 
regular hourly rate which averages $5.65 per hour. The following sets 
forth hourly pay ranges for Captains, Lieutenants, Sergeants and Patrolmen: 
Captain $8.02 Sergeant $6.39 

Lieutenant 7.00 Patrolman 5.34 

In our "pyramided" rank structure. Patrolmen are most numerous and exist in 
an approximate 6 to 1 ratio to Sergeants. Sergeants exist in a 4 to 1 ratio 
to Lieutenants, etc. 

For an"average" class of 36 persons (1 Captain, 2 Lieutenants, 5 Sergeants, 

28 Patrolmen) the overall hourly rate per person equals $5.65. 

An additional 100 police officers, deputy sheriffs and other "mutual aid 
law enforcement personnel employed by nearby governments will not be com- 
pensated with project funds while attending classes. 



j 




Page 3c 



Oc 



and at 25.35% for clerical employees. Insurance subsidies furnished by 
the Grantee city currently are $26.34 per month for each police officer 
and $24.54 per month for other employees, this amount may increase due 
to renegotiations of insurance contracts during January 1972. 

Total Police Personnel salaries (Training Sessions) equal $119,328., 
multiplied by retirement costs of 28.2% equals $33,650. Grantee Contri- 
bution in the aggregate amount of $57,771. will be provided. 

B. Professional ■ Services 

Instructors $15. per hour (average) 759 hours — $11,385. . 

Consultants $100. per day 46 days — 4,600. 

In this project, instructors will be utilized in the presentation of 759 
hours of training materials. It is expected that qualified local per- 
sonnel will handle 185 hours of this total at no cost to the project, by 
virtue of cooperative agreement with local government agencies. 

Salary cost of instructional services varies from $12.00 to $17.50 per 
hour in the local area, so an average is set forth above. 

Consultants having full professional status in Psychology, Sociology 
and Law will be utilized in several phases of this project. Initially 
it is contemplated they will assist in evaluation of field research 
products in the amount of 10 consul tant/days. They will be also 
utilized in the construction of the training curricular with reference 
to content validity and emphasis in their own specialized area. An 
additional 28 consul tant/days will be necessarily expended in course 
instruction. We plan to utilize the remaining 8 consul tant/days in 
review and commentary on the final project documentation. 


L 


j 



C. Travel (Transportation and Subsistence) 

Total $15,568. 

LEAA Support 9,568. 

Grantee Contribution 6,000. 

Research Team Travel LEAA Support $4,243. 

The Project Director and both Assistant Directors will initially 
function as a field "Research Team" and will engage in a total of 
nineteen (19) individual three-day trips to seven major cities 
whose police agencies have functioned to provide security for 
national political conventions and/or are recognized as being 
the locale of massive dissident activity. Selected cities and 
current economy class round trip air fares are as follows; 

Atlantic City, New Jersey $190.00 (2 persons) $380.00 

Chicago, Illinois $178.00 (3 persons) $534.00 

New York City, New York $166.00 (2 persons) $332.00 

Washington, D.C. $146.00 (3 persons) $438.00 

San Francisco, California $334.00 (3 persons) $1002.00 

Research trips to Los Angeles, Berkeley and San 
Francisco will be combined in order to conserve 
east-west travel costs. This inter-city travel is 
computed to be $132.00 $132.00 

$2818.00 

Subsistence funds at $25. per person 

($25. X 57 days) $1425.00 



Instructors Travel LEAA Support $3,000.00 

It is anticipated that travel funds will be required 
to bring approximately ten (10) instructors from other 
areas at an average air fare of $225;, economy class. 

Each instructor will be expected to teach for a period 
of approximately three to five days if traveling to our 
city. Air fares (225 x 10) $2,250.00 

Subsistence (25x10x3) 750.00 

Consultants Travel LEAA Support $2,325.00 

While the utilization of local Consultants will be 
maximized in the interest of prudent fiscal manage- 
ment, it is expected that certain particularly well 
qualified professionals will require transportation 
from other areas. Expenditure for such travel and 
subsistence will be held to eight round-trip air 
fares at an average cost of $225. Subsistence costs 
is anticipated to be $25. per day for a total of 
twenty-one (21) days. 

Travel $1 ,800. 

Subsistence 525. 

LEAA Support $2,325. 

Local Travel Grantee Contribution $6,000.00 

Project Director and two Assistants 
A minimum of two standard automobiles will be required by 
the Project Director and his two Assistants in order to ac- 
complish local travel and transportation needs related to the 
project, particularly in reference to liaison between the 
several "Mutual Aid" enforcement agencies who have agreed to 




- Page 3g 


ment "D" LEAA Support $228,408.00 

The National Political Convention Law Enforcement Services 
Project encompasses research regarding innovative techniques 
and tha devel opment . execution and evaluation qf operational 
pi anni ng . 

To be fully meaningful, a variety of operational equipment is 
budgeted for acquisition. Otherwise unavailable devices will 
thus be made a part of our research effort and will also be of 
benefit to local police agencies in the accomplishment of police 
services . 


Previous experience with a National Political Convention in 1968 
has tended to focus our attention specifically upon the items 
listed below. Each grouping will be commented upon with regard 


to the Project, 


(1) Three Pose mugging camera 

This camera simultaneously takes a full face, 
profile and standing photograph of a subject. 
It is expected to facilitate rapid identifica- 
tion procedures in multiple arrest situations 
and reduce film costs in that all images are 
made on one negative. 

(1) Movie Camera 16 mm Canon "Scoopic 16" with 

(1) Wide Angle Lens and 

(1 ) Fitted field case and tripod 

(1) Film Processing Tank 


$ 3,684.00 

950.00 


$ 1,250.00 


- Page 3h 


The subject camera combines the capability of 
relative low-level illumination picture taking 
with "zoom-lens" magnification and range. Docu- 
mentation of crowd conduct is coupled with the 
ability to zero-in on targets of attack and in- 
dividual leaders. 

This device holds considerable promise as a 
method of gaining intelligence and evidence con- 
cerning concerted group activities. 

(12) Polaroid cameras @ $28.50 each $ 345.00 

(125) Pkgs. Polaroid film @ $3.11 each 389.00 

The twelve (12) Polaroid cameras will be utilized 
to photograph events at the convention site and 
arrested persons, along with the arresting officers 
and any evidentiary items connected with a partic- 
ular event. The ease of use, and rapid development 
of a finished photo, will permit accurate means of 
identification during any possible mass arrest 
situation. Film in the amount of 125 packs of 
eight (8) exposures each at $3.11 per pack is re- 
quired for anticipated coverage. 

Armory & Protective Equipment $ 4,585.00 

(40) Face Shields, for helmets 400.00 

The above protective devices will be furnished to 
members of the Special Tactical forces who will 


- Page 31 


operate in three squads of forty (40) men each. 

These squads are expected to be deployed in the 
event of severe physical confrontation. 

(120) "Gas Hopper" grenades $ 600.00, 

(20) Launchers for above 700.00 

The "Gas Hopper" grenades are indicated to be a 
modernized and effective variation of a previously 
well-known tear gas device. While older grenades 
could be "thrown back" at police officers, the "Gas 
Hdpper" variety, once ignited, continue to move 
fapidly about, defeating attempts to capture until 
the contents have been depleted. 

(5) Gas Dispensers, Federal "on/off Aerotrol" or 

similar. 475.00 

(10) Gas Dispenser Refills for above 400.00 

These units permit a continuous smoke or gas dis- 
persing capability with a high degree of portability 
and rapid initial activation. Inclusion in the 
project will permit field comparison with other gas 
dispensing apparatus and an objective evaluation of 
recently developed equipment. 

(1) Gas and Smoke Generator (Pepper Fogger Type) 375.00 

This continuous emission generator will be deployed 
for use as necessary by selected and trained sub- 
units of the Special Tactical forces. It is considered 


- Page 3j 


to be a necessary adjunct to other equipment 
and represents a capability in non-lethal weaponry 
which is not d-uplicated by other devices employ- 
ing "single shot" delivery systems such as have 
been relied upon in the past. 

(1) Metal Detection Sweeper, with Amplifier $ 200.00 

(2) Metal Detection "friskers" hand held 595.00 

Proper and adequate searching for weapons and 

other metalic devices concealed upon the person 
of individuals who must be rapidly processed 
into custodial facilities can best be accom- 
plished by Metal Detection Equipment. 

Additional utility is gained in the search of 
premises for pipe bombs or other explosive devices 
having metal parts. Prior experience during the 
1968 convention indicates that bomb threats requir- 
ing rapid and discreet searches will occur, not 
only in the assembly areas but in the hotel facilities 
occupied by candidates, delegates and party officials. 

(2000) Plastic Retaining Cuffs, disposable nylon 

plastic $800.00 

(20) Marking Pens, for nylon cuffs 40.00 

The use of standard metal ratchet-locking hand- 
cuffs during periods of rapid multiple prisoner 
processing poses serious problems of equipment 
accountability and the continued capability of 



- Page 3k 


the officer to restrain a second or third 
prisoner. Disposable plastic cuffs may be 
carried by individual officers in sufficient 
quantity for twenty-five prisoners or more. They 
may be marked with the arresting officer's name, 
a case number or the code section under which the 


arrest was made, thereby facilitating booking and 
identification procedures. 


ht Vision & Optical Equipment $ 1 E 

(4) Sylvania Model 221 Night Viewing Devices 

@ $2,995.00 each 11 

(2) T V Adapters 0 $250.00 each 
(2) Camera Adapters @ $250.00 each 

(2) Binocular Viewers O $600.00 each 1 

(2) 28 mm Lens @ $157.00 each 

(2) 50 mm Lens @ $119.95 each 

(2) 100 mm Lens @ $149.00 each 

(2) 300 mm Lens 0 $485.00 each 

(4) Carrying Cases 0 $52.60 each 

(1) Zoom Lens 25mm - 100mm 

(1) Zoom Lens 15mm - 145mm 

These electro-optical devices require no indepen- 
dent light source such as Infra-red. The unit 
amplifies any existing light and displays an image 
similar to a television picture. Using these units, 
convention complex security officers could observe 
any night-time activity that may be of an immediate 


$ 19,138.00 


1 1 ,980.00 
500.00 


threat . 


- Page 31 


(2) Mitralux High Intensity Lights, with portable $ 1,660.00 
110 volt alternating current generators 
These lighting devices are extremely powerful, 
portable light sources capable Of illuminating 
an area equal to one city block to an extent 
that conventional photography is possible. 

Contemplated applications during the national 
political convention are numerous and include 
nighttime emergencies, crowd control, and situ- 
ations where adequate lighting will enhance the 
security of crucial locations. 

Porta bl e Field Fingerprinting Kit 290.00 

Kit contains inks, rollers, plates, cards, mag- 
nifiers and related cleaning equipment for portable 
field usage. 

Gym and Physical Conditioning Equipment 
(1) Universal 15 position mini-gym 
( 1 ) 20 ' x20 ' Resi 1 i te Mat 

Labor and materials to construct outdoor obstacle 
course. 

This equipment is required to condition and 
train police personnel with regard to physical 
demands which are most likely to occur during 
convention related events and crowd control. 

Conditioning is particularly important with 
regard to minimizing fatigue factors and psy- 
chological enhancement toward predictable con- 


$ 5,000.00 

2,600.00 
800.00 

1 ,600.00 


f rontati on . 


- Page 3m 


Radio and Communications Equipment 

LEAA SUPPORT $178,486.00 

(45) Portable Radio Transmitter Receiver Units, $50,700.00 
5 Channel, transistorized F.M., rechargeable 
at $1,060.00 each $ 47,700.00 

(45) Batteries, spares @ $50.00 each 2,250.00 

(5) Battery chargers, six unit for above (to afford 

twenty-four (24) hour capabi 1 i ty ) ,@$1 50 . 00 each 750.00 

The above described "walkie-talkie" type units 
are highly necessary for field deployed operations 
as coriimand comirtuni cations equipment and also as 
intermediate links between command officers and 
sub-units or individual officers who are selectively 
deployed. The five channel capability permits 
flexible and timely inter-network coordination be- 
tween "mutual aid" enforcement agency commanders 
and compatibly permits communication flow among 
subordinate units attached to any of several "in- 
dependent" agencies. 

1. We presently have twenty-four (24) 2-channel portable 
radios which are crystalled for routine police 
operations. These units are between 2 and 8 years 
old. 

2. Severe limitations in overall capability were ex- 
perienced during the 1968 Political Convention. 

A. Timely communications were impossible because of 
incompatible borrowed equipment; equipment was 


- Page 3r, 


unfamiliar to our men; design incompatible 
between our equipment and that which was pro- 
vided by Department of Defense; impossible to 
effectively relay information between diverse 
cooperating police agencies, necessitating 
radios with five (5) or more frequencies which 
were unavailable. 

3. The minimal number of five (5) channel sets is re- 
quested and can be expected to serve twenty (20) 

Field or Squad Supervisors while the existing twenty- 
four (24) 2-channel sets are committed to convention 
and non-convention activities. 

4. Assurance can be given that all 5 channels can be 
used in conjunction with the diverse cooperating 
agencies . 

5. This choice of channels will prevent possible total 
jamming of all communications with Command Personnel. 

Spare batteries and battery chargers are necessary 

to provide continuous operational capability for the 
portable radio units. 

Radio Crystals 200 sets @ $30.00 each $ 6,000.00 

Frequencies used in transmitting and receiving 
are determined by specially fabricated crystals. 

In order to provide inter-unit and interdepart- 
mental cross communication, two hundred crystals 
at $30.00 per set of two are needed. 


Page 3o 



Helmet Radios , microphone and speaker, transistorized, two- 

way $ 7,950.00 

(35) Units, single speaker @ $150.00 each 5,250.00 

(IS) Units, two speaker @ $180.00 eacn 2,700.00 

In recent years the proliferation of "required 
items" which a police officer must wear or carry 
has resulted in a situation tending to deprive 
him of the full use of both arms. Most portable 
radio transmitter units in current use require 
the hand manipulation of the entire instrument, 
or at least a microphone and switch, in order to 
engage in transmission. 

When the need to use the radio coincides with the 
physical requirements of arrest or search, or in 
subduing an unruly prisoner, either the business 
at hand or the radio message must wait until the 
officer can afford to free at least one arm. 

An innovative modification holding promise in this 
regard is the Helmet Radio listed above. One speaker 
(or two for use in high noise areas) are placed 
within a police helmet in close proximity to the 
wearer's ear. A bone-conduction microphone is 
mounted in the upper inside portion of the helmet. 

Thus equipped, an officer confronted with respon- 
sibilities requiring full use of both arms is not 
jeopardized because of the need to actuate a radio. 


- Page 3p 


The 50 units would serve all diverse cooperating 
agencies. 

Experience has proven that: 

A. Both arms must be free in crowd control. 

B. Military clip-on types have been used unsuccess- 
fully. 

(1) Attachment devices are designed for military 
steel helmets cind frequently fell off. 

(2) Frequencies were military and incompatible 
with existing equipment. 

(3) Wires running from officer's belt to his 
head-set interferred with his ability to 
function in crowd control. 

(4) Transmitter tied up one hand during use. 

(5) Receiver was unintelligible in high noise 
areas. , 

Maintenance and retention of this unique item would 
provide a continuing capability with regard to 
frequent situations occurring in connection with arrests, 
searches, crowd control, et. within this region where 
complete freedom of both arms and hands are necessary by 
officers . 

These units will enhance the communications capability 
during the time of greatest need and experience has shown 
that this method approaches a minimum acceptable standard. 
These units will provide dependable audio reception in 
areas of high ambient noise. 





- Page 3q 


6. These units have automatic voice actuated trans- 
mitters requiring no manual manipulation. 


Radio Paging System , complete $ 15,600.00 

(1) Basic System 7,011.00 

(23) Pagers 7,830.00 

(3) 5 unit chargers 360.00 

(5) 1 unit chargers 100.00 

(23) Batteries 299.00 


This system is necessary to provide the ability 
to reach key command or technical personnel whose 
duties do not require two-way radio capability. 

Persons in this category are those who may be 
field deployed but who need to respond by telephone 
or in person based upon a general call. 

Mobile Command Van $ 42,300.00 

(1) Van, customized, with portable llOV. AC generator 

andair-conditioning 35,000.00 

(3) Mobile Relay Units, 2 channel, 100 watts 6,400.00 

(4) Antennas, for above 900.00 

Deployed Field Command communication capability 

is of utmost importance when dealing with either 
massed or skirmish-like disorder situations. 

Usual police emergency radio dispatch centers are 
engineered to provide effective communications in 
a generally acceptable but limited spectrum of 
situations. Routinely, individual units assigned 
to defined zones deal with a predictable range of 
police service situations which we have learned to 


- Page 


3r 

codify with "Q signals" and "Standard Operating 
Procedures . " 

Extensively dissimilar radio capabilities become 
mandatory as new tactical groupings are adopted 
in response to needs best met by massed platoon or 
squad effort. 

The physical separation of field command communi- 
cations from the usual police dispatch center (while 
maintaining secure radio links between both) permits 
"close in" advantages to the Field Commander while 
maintaining the operational integrity of the basic 
radio system. 

1. Experience has shown that proximity to the scene of 
events requiring police services is mandatory for 
effective command control. Communications are the 
heart of field command operations and as such, they 
must be in immediate and dependable readiness at al 1 
times during this convention. 

2 . Experience with borrowed equipment in 1 968 resulted 
in its loss during a most crucial period. 

3. Adapting borrowed equipment of such complexity to 
serve the convention needs requires: 

A. Planning and command documentation 

B. Deployment of personnel 


C. 


Training of personnel to famil iarize them 
with this resource. 


- Page 3 ^ 


D. Compatibility of ■ communicati ons equipment. 

E. Liability on part of borrower. 

F. Time frame of required availability prior 
to and during the convention makes rental 
or 1 oan impracti cal . 

4. Critical events requiring presence of command personnel 
occur in diverse areas throughout the entire city thus 
resulting in the need for the mobility that this equip- 
ment would provide. These occurrences are only in part 
predictable requiring great flexibility of movement and 


rapid implementation of command procedures. 

5. Routine municipal police services must be maintained in 
all operational aspects without overload or disruption 
from convention generated activities. Particularly in 
the area of communication this equipment will provide 
the necess ary , cros s- communi cati 0 n link. 

Radio Scrambler System $ 22,621.00 

(1) Radio Speech Scrambler, Base station unit 

at 466.00 


(^) Radio Scramblers, mobile units at $297.00 each 

( 6 #) Connecting Cables @ $5.00 each 
74 ' 

(^) Scrambler Modules @ $14.50 

Police radio communications are effective only to 
the extent that they are secure from unauthorized 
interception by persons who would capitalize on 
the information transmitted. 


si.61 790 . 0 0 
TfrS ^O - OO - 
00 

3-9-e-rOtI 

^ O 0 

az-0-^ 


- Page st 


j 

1. This equipment will permit this department to 
maintain the integrity of its command communications 

1 with regard to unauthorized interception by dis- 

ruptive groups which, past experience has. shown, desire 
to embarrass or defeat law enforcement agencies in provid- 
ing security services during the convention. 

2. This department is currently without any of this equip- 
ment and attempts to rent and borrow have been futile. 

3. Past occurrences within the City of Miami Beach have 
proven beyond any doubt that clandestine monitoring has 
and will continue to occur. Availability of this equip- 
ment now will be of significant benefit in insuring the 
protection of the dignitaries and candidates frequent- 
ing this city from .now and thru the convention's many 
events . 

Closed Circuit Television Equipment 

(2) Cameras "Low-light level" with remote pan-, tilt 
zoom lens at $5085. each 

(4) Cameras, Standard with lens at $1495. each 
(8) Monitors at $320. each 

(5) Microphones at $70, each 
(4) Microphone Boom Stands at $45. each 
(1) Sound Mixer 
(1) Synchronizing Generator 

Lighting Equipment 


and 


$33,315.00 

$10,170.00 
$ 5,980.00 
$ 2,560.00 
$ 350.00 

$ 180.00 
$ 650.00 

$ 1 , 100.00 
$ 1 , 200.00 
$ 4,200.00 


.(100) Video Recording Tapes at $42. each 


- Page 3u - 


•v 



(1 ) Video Tape Recorder at $2,600. 

$ 2,600.00 

Spare Parts 

$ 1,850.00 

Cabling 

$ 425.00 

(6) Desk Stands at $25. each 

$ 150.00 

Tripods, Pan Heads, Switching Equipment, Field Test 
Instruments and Accessories. 

$ 1 ,900.00 


1- To provide a capability for observation of those crucial 
areas which are not practically surveilled, i.e.: the rear 

of the speaker platform; crowded spectator areas, points of 
ingress and egress, demonstration areas, (both designated 
and spontaneous), areas adjacent to platform and credential- 
meetings, caucauses, and other critical events generated 
throughout the convention. 

2. All indications lead us to believe that it would be impractical to 
rent or lease this equipment. This analogy can be made because: 

A. The required training for maximum utilization. 

B. Planning for conceptual utilization requires through 
knowledge of equipment capability, and factors of mobility 
and dependability. 

C. Placement, operations and maintenance must be done by in- 
house personnel to prevent possible compromise. 

3. Past experience has proven that evidence recorded in this method 


is admissible in court for prosecution provided that the custodial 
chain of evidence has been maintained. 


4. Manpower resources, otherwise encumbered in surveillance may be 
re-allocated to other demands. 

5. Actual observation by the commander provides more efficient and ac- 
• curate information for decision making and response. 

6. ' The proposed equipment has been selected because of its flexibility 

and effectiveness in various levels and kinds of ambient light, and 
due to need for portability and speed of installation and applica- 
tion. 

Mini Bus, 22 Passenger $14,500.00 

The need for a medium sized wholly controlled vehicle of 
this type was generated from prior experience in 1968 during 
the Republican National Political Convehtion. 

The transport of police personnel in Task Force or Tactical 
squad size is made possible with such a vehicle. Bulky equip- 
ment is also moved about as field problems require. The same 
vehicle is particularly useful for prisoner transport in multiple 
arrest situations. Leasing or rental of similar equipment was 
impossible during the previous convention due to the demands 
placed upon public and private transportation companies. 


Graphic Status Display Devices $2,725.00 

(1) B7 (4‘ X 6') Charcoal Gray, Magnetic Board $ 185.00 

(1) B3 (3‘ X 5') " " " " $ 94.50 

(6) SP3 (3‘ X 5') Solid Gray, Magnetic Board $169. 

each $1,014.00 

(1) Wall Bracket $ 140.00 


Card Holders, Inserts, Adhesive Stickers, Tape 
Acetate, Magnets, Rubber Chart Liners and Storage 


Boxes 


$1 ,291.50 


- Page 3w - 




Graphic Status Display Devices 

The magnetic boards, charts, indicator devices and related accessories are 
necessary for utilization in Command Post and radio dispatching centers for 
the purpose of tactical deployment planning and organizational control of 
the several diverse but cooperating police agencies which will provide 
police manpower. 


E. Supplies and Other Operating Expenses 

TOTAL 
LEAA Support 
Grantees Contribution 

Office Space, rental value 

To accommodate four (4) persons requiring 150 sq. ft. each 
600 sq. ft. 0 $7. per annum $4,200. - 15 mos. 

Computation includes utilities and janitorial services. 
Telephone PBX extension 
15 months, 2 lines 0 $13.40 each per month 
Telephone, long distance tolls, 15 months O $50. per month 
Office Equipment Cost 
4 desks and chairs 
2 file cabinets 
1 typewriter, electric 

1 photocopier, automatic, rental 15 months 0 $25. 

1 mimeograph, electric, rental 15 months 0 $25. 

Postage, 15 months 0 $35. 

Office supplies, 15 months 0 $50. 


$54,410.00 

$32,135.00 

$22,275.00 


$ 5,250.00 


$ 425.00 
$ 750.00 

$ 575.00 
$ 150.00 
$ 500.00 
$ 375.00 
$ 375.00 
$ 525.00 
$ 750.00 


I 


- Page 3x - 


Documents, Purchase and Printing 

Purchase of reference literature and texts 
Printing docu^’ents - 3 volumes - 50 copies 0 $5. each 
Classroom, Remodeling and Equipment 

Modification of existing structure to accommodate training 
sessions 

Classroom Equipment, Chairs, Tables, Blackboards, Podium, 
Easels, 

Overhead Projector and Transparency Maker 
Public Address System 


$ 450.00 
$ 750.00 

$12,500.00 

$ 2,500.00 
$ 665.00 

$ 450.00 


Indirect Costs Computed § 5% of total project costs 


$27,320.00 


For* LEAA^E^S 
(tdUlon 12-30-M 



KENT OF JUS 
EHENT ASSIS 
NISTRATION 




6od9«t C«U9or1t| 


Hrtonnel (StliHts 4nd Itruflu) 


rroTMtiontj SvnMcts (IndWIdMlt 
•fid Consulting 0rg«nli4t1oM tnd 



■APPLICATIOH FOR GRANT. 
•DISCRETIONARY FUNDS 
PAGE ^ 



....... . .T4i 89«nc 

b«tn eonucttd for tssliUncc on this or sinilir 
projoctft tos H o V If Yes* identify 

•nd Indtcite sutus: 


SIaNDAJEO ORANT CONOITIOHS Ap^icsnl ujttftrtUMd* Afr*** th4t »ny difvetljr or lhrou|H ilt ,SUt* 

dtil|nat*4 ufidrt P, L. 40 «)SI, •# a ratuU of thir *hatl iubjr<t to and in> 


• vt rnl><r> *in#nt pUnhtnf «|tncy 
rpFirtI* lollowinf grant «ondilien* 


0) hojorta. Th* irkntrr ahall tubmil* »t •««■») Urn«« and in «i»ch form m«y praarribod, au<h raporu *a tha Law Entort rmmt Aaaiatam 
raaannably ^a^uirr. intlgding quartarly linan* iai rapcrta and pariodlr prograat rapoMl and final findbciai and narralivr rrp'ir'a. 


’ Adminiilrati'.n may 


•'tMitta tvpportrd by thia graiR prodaca arl|lMi bool#, manaala. filmi. or olhar copyrigMabU mairr.ai. ih. grant** may ropyr.ghi 
but LCAA raaarvaa a royalty. fraa. iwm «a> Uaira and irravocabla lieana* (o product. puMiaK, and uaa a«eh rnatmala. and to aulhorii* ..thrra lo do #-i. 


fSf PaljL^.*,* ff any diarnvrry nr Invanlton ariaea or •• d*«»iopod tn tha eoura* of or at a raauil of worV parform*d undrr iHii grant, by any l*v*| of implrrornling 
frangaa, aubgrontaa. or contractor, th* grantaa aSall rafar tba diacorary or invantion to LCAA. wtiich will dairrminr wKclhar oi not pal*nl prottction will br 
aowgbt. how any rigkta tharain, inctudln| pntant rifhla, will ba dlapoaad of and admJniatarad. and Ih# naciaatty til other arlinn raquirad to protrck tha public 
****^*** "* aupporlod with Tadarat lunda. all In aecordanea with tha Praaidanlial Mamorandum of Oclobar 10. I9bl. on Covornmani Palant Policy. Tha 

graMaa in hla final narrativa raport taa* III abovo) ahall tdanklfy any diaeovary or inTantion anting undar or davatuprd in lha toorr* of or aa • ratuil of work 
parformod undar ihia grant or ahall rartify that thara ara «o tn<h invantfena or diacovanai. 


**’ ®" *V «'<“»<• *'**d. -'lor or national origin, ba ancludad from participation m. be raluatd tha banafttt 

graiita CraiTla muat <'^'»minail« undar grant# awardad purtuam to P. L. <10051 or any projacl. program, acl.v.ty. or aubgrant aupportrd by auch 

. !^!lf ^ ^ pravlalona and ragtdramania of TItIa V| ©f tha ClrtJ Rightt Act of 1544 and ragulalmna itauad br ihr DroaMmrni of 

imi«.^nro^V»uV,»w?a'^?^ ««tlnuad gram aupport. Grant... furth.r mua. comply with thr fu.t.cl Daparimror^u.l 

anforc^mMtttgT^iaa and ^har HaT program#, to tha ar>d that diacrimirutton in employmant practic r. of Stair planning ag.noct, law 

on tho ground, of rnco col^r cr!!d * »»■ 'rfficoa admlnlptoring. cofiductin| or participating >| any program or activity rttaiving Tedaral financial ataiatanco. 

5«n*«VnlT ‘.H^praud to r.,ulra tha impo.iiion in SUta plan, or* 


■Unnlno naonr* oukovarw - — ..-o-. wm oumiooioo. mil gram conoillon ihall not bo intarpralad to raquira tha 

Morr.nMiA Tli. Ualt.C 9Ul.t ........ th. rl|hl u ...k jailcill .Fj.rtarT.... .1 Ihl. ..nCIU.i., 


I impoaition tn Stale plana □ 
racial imbalance m a lav 


<S| TormlnatioB ai Aid, Thia aram k« • 

to .11 .., ,.„k ,11 P L. «.MI '•"Cll,... .bli,.ti.„.. w 


«:in.r'to”rvi;.' 7 '‘::;;r^ •' 

aontractera. aa providtd in Soctlon 511 of P V oo «ai ******* f tcorda of lha grantaa, t 

projact. sattlon 511 of P. C. 5d-l51. A Mtlco to iHia affacl ahall appaar in all tubg 


ly of thair duly authoriaad rapraiantativai. ahall hava an oaa 
aa. and to raiavant bnnka and rarorda of auhgranttaa and 
aubgranta and olhar arrangamrnta for implomanlatiun of ihia 















*i' 1 


# # 

I APPLICATION FOR GRANT— DISCRETIONARY FUNDS | 


16. STAKOARO GRANT CONDITIONS— (Coiit'd) Ptoe S 

Ualnt—aac# pC AU r«^lr«d records elwU b« malnUlMd until an audit by LEAA or Ita rapr«a«Matlvaa la enmplatad and alt quaitiuna ariaingthara from 

ara raaotvad. or for Mira* yaara alUr final paymant la mada on Aa grant, aubgrant. contract, or aubeontract undar which thia project la baing Implamantad. 
whlchavar la aoonar. 

(•> Utlilaation and Pavroawt of Tintda. Fuoda awarded may ba anpandad only for purpoiaa and acllvltlat covered by grantaifa approvedprojact plan and 

Project fundi may ba mada available through a Uttar of credit ayatem purauant to rulea and preeeduraa aa to eitabllahment, wUhdrawala. etc. , laaued hf the 
Admlnialvation and with which granteaa muat comply. Whara grant awardi ara not aufflcUBUy Urga to require thla ayaum. paymaata will ba mada on the b^>a 
of periodic requaata and aatlmetaa of fund aeeda eubmltted by the graataa. Paymanti will ba adjuated to correct previoua ovorpaymanta or underpaymanta and 
dUallowaacea reaulting from audit. Uattare of credit may be revoked for failure to comply with raqulramanta parUlnlng thereto. 

lot AljowaHU Cnete . Th- elln^nMIltw nl eneie laeurrad under any erani ahall be ddiarmlnt^ In aceor^nca with the general principlai of allowablilty and lUndarda 
for aaUcted coat itama aet forth in Buteeu of Bodget Ciiculir No. A-S7, •• PrUcipiti for fietarhdhi'Pi co ela Ab&litabU 1o Qfacte «d 

Local CovemmanU .** aa further defined and dallmlted la coedltloBa 10 and It below, and in the LEAA Ptnapclal Guide for AdmjnUtratloa-Ql-^nalng Action 

GrtMe. 

(10) Egpenaea Not Allowable. Grant fund# nnay not be expaetded for (a) itema not pert of the approved budget or aeperately approved by LEAA; (b) purchaae or 

construction of land and buildlafa or Improvamasta thereon, or peymaet of reel eatate nortgagaa or taxea. unlasa apeclfieally provided for inthagrantagraamant; 
(c) duea to organiaationa or federatlona; (d) antartalnmaet, amuaamenta. or aoclal aetivltiaa. and incldantal costa related thereto: (a) purchase of autontoblles or 
ether automotive vehiclee unleea provided for in the fract agreemset. or (f) indirect (overhead) costsi whirs ths grantee does not have an Indirect expanae 
alloeatioa ayaUm and rata eccapUble to LEAA. Expmdltora of fuada in excaaa of the aubmittad total coat astimata (or any major budfatcaUgarywillbaparmUtad 
only with LEAA approval where title involves an Increase of nwre than 10 percent la the total caUgory cost estimate. Such increases wUl be desmsd. la effect, 
to constitute ea emeadmeat of the great epplieettoa ead award raqulriag graetor eoaeurraaea. In certain easaa, grantaaa which ara Stata law ealoreamaat 
plannltig agencUs may extend these epprovale on behalf of LEAA for thsir aubgrantess. 

1*tlittan Approval of Chaaiea . GranUee most obtala prior written approval (rom LEAA for major project changes. Thess include (a) chaagee of substance ht 
project activities, daaigne. ot research plsuie eat forth la the approved application; (b) ebangea In the project director or key profaeilonel paraoaael Idantifiad 
la the approved appllcatlen: aad (c) ekaagea la the approved project budget aa epaelfled la the preceding eoadltion. 

^_»Jsct tacofne, AU interest or'othsr income earned by ths graotea erlth respect to graot fuads or as a result of conduct of ths grant project (cals of publications 
ragistratlea faaa* aerviee chatgea on fees. ate. ) most ba accouated for. Interaat on graat fuada muat ba raturnad to LEAA fay chock peyabla to ths United Stataa 
Treasury, end other Income should he applied to project purposee or in redueden of project costa; provided, howavar . that if the grantee le e unit of govarnmant, 
graniaa ahall not be eeeeuatabla for ioderaat earned on grant funda paading their dlaluraamtEi or actual application for projact purpoase. 

(1)) Title to Property. Title to property acquired in whole or In part with gram fwda in accordance with approved budgata ahall vaat in the grantee, aubjact to 
divastmant at the option of LEAA (to the extant of LEAA contribution toward the purehaaa thereof) axarciaabla only upon notice within 120 daya altar the and of 
the graot period or tarmlnatlon of the grant. Crantaea ehall exercise due cert le tilt use. melntansnce. protection and preservation of such property during the 
period of project use. 

(U) PubUcatione . The grantee may ^bliSh* at ita own expehse. the results of graiA activity wlthoiH prior rsVisw l>y LeAA provldM that any pufaUeatlon (wrlUen. 
visual, or aound) reniaina an acknowtadgamant of LEAA grant aupport. At least 2S eoplaa of any auch publication must be furaiskad to LEAA but only 10 coplaa 
of training malartals (whara uaad in grantprojact) most be auppllsid. except ea otharvlsa requeated or approved by LEAA. Publication of documents or reports 
with grant ftmds beyond quaetltlaa required to meat atandard report raquiramaata muat ba provided for in approved project plana or budgata or otharwida ifpprevad 
by LEAAend. for large quantity publication, manuaerlpta muat be aubmittad In edvaeca to LEAA. 

(19) Third Party Participelion. No contract or agraament may be entered into by the grantee (or axacution of project aetivltiaa or provlaion of aarvlcaa is e grant 
project (other than purehaaa of auppllaa or atandard commercial or maintananea aarvlcaa) which ia not incorporated in the approved propoaal or, approved in 
advance by LEAA. Any auch arrangemente shall provide that the grantee will retain ultimate control end raspoaaibillty for tha grant project and that the 
contractor or aubgrantaa ahall ha bound by thaaa graat ceedltiona end any other raqutramanta applicable to tha grantee ia tha conduct of tha project. 


D^) Obligati on of CrasA Fuada . Grant fuada may not. without advance written approval by LEAA. be obligated prior to tha effective date or aubaaqusat to the 

termlnetlea data of the great period. Obllgationa outatandiag aa of the termination date ahall be liquidated within 90 daya. Such obligatiooa must ba related to 
gooda or aervicea provided and utilised wltbia the grant period. 


^iacal Retnlat lona. The fiscal administrstlon of grants shall be eubjaet to each further rulea. ragulatloaa. and policies, ceocarning accounting aad racorda. 
peymaat of funds, coat allowability, subenission of fioencU! reports, stc. . as may ba prescribed by LEAA. including those set forth in the LEAA Quids for 
_Discretio»nry Grant P rogrants aad those apeclfled as appUeebla io diacratieenry grants. in tha IXAA Finanelal Guide for Admlniatratloo of Planning and Action 
Crenta. “ ' ' ' ' . 


17. 


ASSURANCE or COMPLIAKCE WITH CIVtt, MCHTS ACT OF 19647 Ths ttiBlee hereby essures lh«l It will comply with sad will insure compUsnee by Iti t^grenlssr 
and contreetors with Title VI of the Civil RIgbte Act of I9b4 ell requlramanls Imposed by er pursuant to regulations of tha Oaperfamant of Juatiea (26 C. F. R. Part 
42) Issued pursuant to that title, to tha aad that no parson ehall. entite grounds of race, color, or aational origin, be excluded (rom perticipation in, be danU tha 
hsnafits of. er be etherwiae subjected to diecrlmlDation under any program or activity for which the applicant receives Federal financial aaaiatanee (rom the Depart* 
meat of Jastice. Tha grastae further will comply with end insure compliance by its aubgranteee and contractors with Justice Department equal employment 
regulation la federally aeeialed programs (2t C. F. R. Pert 42| subpert D) to the and that emptoymaot dlacximinatlon in such programs on tha grounds of race, color, 
creed or national origin, ahall be eliminated. Tha grantee reeognieea the right of the United flutes to aaak Judicial anforcamant of the foregoing covenants against 
dieeriminatlon. end will Include e similar cirvaneot asaurlag tiie right of the United flUtss to seek judicial anforcamant in Its subgrants or contracts. J 


TOnsran : 

Oct. 


inrT oh i 

Appllcat 


PtoM in 

ir 


^ ^^turv6f /iuthorlEBd lfr^f^lB^ (itw 9 or AppilcfltlonJ 


iZD. statt Fitming A 9 tncy Gtrtiricttion tiid iipprovfli Efiected 
ylT Tts £7 ^ /I7 •tot A^Hcflble 





Clifford W. O'Key, City Manager 


DF 19 




«C 


i U. S. DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

APPLICAT ION FOR GRANT 

1 LAW ENFORCEMENT ASSISTANCE 

DISCRET lOHARY FUNDS 

^ ADMINISTRATION 

PAGE 6 


22. PROJtCT PLAN AND SUPPORTING DATA 

Pltttt state clearly and In detail, within tan Mges If possible, the alms of the project, precisely what will be done, who will be 


- Page 6 - 



*B f 




PROJECT PLAN AND SUPPORTING DATA 

Part I GOALS 

The primary goal of this proposal is to enhance local police capabilities in 
providing effective law enforcement services for, and during National Political 

Conventions. 

Contained within the primary Goal are six subordinate goals which must be achieved 
in order to fully accomplish our objective. These subordinate goals are as follows: 

1. To comprehensively research and document problems and solutions with regard to 
police service during National Political Conventions. 

2. To draw operational and tactical plans for implementation of police services. 

3. To train police personnel to function effectively with regard to the demands 
placed upon them. 

4. To equip this department with certain devices in augmentation of local resources 
so as to enhance present capabilities. 

5. To effectively implement our plans with trained and equipped police personnel 
during National Political Conventions. 

6. To fully and objectively document the results and relative effectiveness of 
our initial research, planning, training, equipping and operational execution of 

police services. 

Part II IMPACT AND RESULTS 

This project has vital significance in many distinct areas. 

The awesome responsibility of law enforcement to uphold the Constitutional Guarantees 
of freedom of speech and of assembly is never greater than when these fundamental 
rights are exercised within our political system to select candidates for our highest 
public office. 

Past experience has demonstrated that those Americans who represent our electors, 
and the host community itself, are most likely to be placed in the shadow of in- 
timidation by the disaffected within our society who would escalate the right of 


dissent into public disruption. 


< •> 


# # 

- Page 7 - 

It is no exaggeration to say that the eyes and ears of the world are focused upon 
the host community and its highly visible law enforcement resources during this 
enactment of contemporary history. 

It is clear that the highest degree of professional competence and sophistication 
is most urgently needed to meet so serious a challenge. 

Further, it is inescapable that ours is the front-line agency most fundamentally 
and directly responsible for maintaining the safety of delegates, party officials, 
candidates for the office of President, and the entire community under conditions 
which are exceedingly critical and complex. 

The impact of our program includes, but also goes far beyond law enforcement. 

Both positive and negative implications occur. 

As an example, should local law enforcement fail to function adequately in this 
context, it is most probable our system for selecting candidates for our nation's 
highest office will of necessity be drastically modified. 

In a positive sense, of course, we seek to achieve resounding success in providing 
police services for the convention to the credit of all law enforcement and of our 
Nation. Concretely, our initial research and documentation will bring together and 
clarify matters which currently are matters of mere empirical evaluation and con- 
jecture. 

We will generate planning documents for the deployment of men and resources, opera- 
tionally and tactically, to meet a wide variety of conflict situations. 

Our training curricul with constituent lecture presentations will represent a 
systematic body of knowledge regarding the needs and solutions to major problems 
of vital concern to law enforcement throughout our nation. Subject areas will 
necessarily include; 




Crowd Psychology 
Management of Conflict 
Intelligence Operations 
Equipment Familiarization and Use 
Personal Defense 
Special Tactical Force Training 

It is not expected that the above listing may be considered complete, as our re- 
search will undoubtedly generate insight into additional training requirements. 

The final documentation will result from evaluation and comment concerning all 
preceding stages. Our approach will be law enforcement oriented and concerned 
primarily with the question of operational effectiveness of our planning, training, 
equipping and deployment. 

Additionally, by virtue of the inclusion of professional consultants we seek to 
document germain psychological and sociological overtones to the main law enforce- 
ment effort. 

We propose to generate three volumes of documentation of fifty (50) copies each 
for dissemination to law enforcement agencies generally. These will be tntitled 
as follows: 

Volume I Requirements for Police Services during National Political 
Conventions 

Volume II Training and equipping Police for National Political Convention 
Service 

Volume III Police Operational Planning and Execution, National Political 


Convention. 


r 






# 

- Page 9 - 


Part III METHODS AND TIMETABLE 

Methodology with regard to the implementation of this program is contained within 
five discernible and inter-relating stages, as follows: 

I Research III Training and Equipping 

II Operational Planning IV Execution of Police Services 

V Evaluation and Documentation 

Timetable 

The total duration of this project will encompass a period of fifteen (15) 
months. It must be recognized that while the several phases are described 
in terms of a particular time frame, the various stages must "telescope" 
and operate both sequentially and simultaneously. 

I Research 

During the first three (3) month period immediately following grant approval 
we will employ a Project Director, who, with two Assistant Project Directors, 
will engage in research of existing resources. 

This will be done by the acquisition of literature and text materials on the 
subjects of Conflict Management, Dissident Groups and Individuals, Intelligence 
Production, Tactical Communications and related subject areas. 

Research effort will also focus upon interviews with key police personnel of 
seven other cities which have provided police services to National Political 
Conventions or are recognized to be the location of incipient public demonstra- 
tion and disorder. Acquisition of previous planning efforts and operational 
procedures will also be accomplished in those cities. 

II Operational Planning 

Operational Planning will be undertaken in light of the previous research and 
• evaluation. It is anticipated that approximately six (6) months will be required 


L 


Ji. <» « 


# f 

- Page 10 - 

to develop planning required for the following categories of accomplishment: 
General Field Operations and Security Plans 
Tactical Operations Plans 
Contingency Planning 
Training Plans, Guides and Outlines 
Resources and Equipment acquisition Planning 
III Training and Equipping 

Training and Equipping will require a period of approximately five (5) months 
for accomplishment. This time frame projection is based upon factors of student 
availability due to shift work, irregular days off, court appearance require- 
ments, and also because our forces will consist of personnel employed by at 
least five separate law enforcement agencies, i.e. 

Miami Beach Police Department 
Metropolitan Department of Public Safety 
Florida Highway Patrol 
Miami Police Department 

Florida Department of Natural Resources - Enforcement Personnel 
Time Schedule for Equipment 

Delivery Date 


1. 

Photo Equipment 

MAY 

'72 

2. 

Armory and Protective Equipment 

MAY 

'72 

3. 

Electronic Surveillance and Equipment 

JAN. 

'll 

4. 

Radio Communications Equipment 




Transmitter, Portable 

FEB. 

'll 


Changers 




Helmet Radios 




Communications Van 


JAN. '72 


- Page 11 - 


r... . 





Del i very 

Date 

Relay Units 

DEC. 

'71 

Scrambl ers 

DEC. 

■71 

Closed Circuit TV 

JAN. 

'72 


IV Execution of Police Services 

This phase will involve a time span of approximately six weeks by virtue of 
Platform Hearings, Convention Committee Meetings and the Convention Meetings 
in chief. 

■V Evaluation and Documentation 

The final stage, that of Evaluation and Documentation, is expected to be 
accomplished in two and one-half months and will be the responsibility of the 
Project Director, Assistant Project Directors and consultants in the area of 
criminology, psychology and sociology. 

Part IV EVALUATION 

Evaluation of our project will be accomplished within the documentation generated 
during the final phase above. It is proposed to have the Project Director and his 
assistants perform the major portion of this effort with reference to operational 
and tactical efficiency of planning, equipment usage and pre-convention training. 
It is recommended that professional consultants in the fields of sociology, 
psychology, criminology and the law also participate in post-convention evaluation 
It is expected that meaningful contributions would be generated with regard to the 
impact and duration upon police personnel of the complex experiences involved. 

N.B. We would solicit the direct involvement of LEAA in the evaluation of the 
project by virtue of its scope, complexity, and potential for impact upon many re- 
lated police problems. 


L 





• f 

- Page 12 - 


Part V RESOURCES 
Personnel : 

Project Director (To be selected) 

This person will be employed on the basis of extensive law enforcement 
or related experience in an executive or administrative position. Demonstrated 
ability to manage personnel, resources and funds, to conduct research and pro- 
duce evaluative reporting and plans will be essential. 

Assistant Project Directors: 

The Project Director Will be supported by two (2) Captains of Polite who 
are currently members of the grantee police department. Each have had 
considerable and increasingly more responsible experience in numerous 
specialized and general assignments. Educational backgrounds include 
the FBI National Academy, Southern Police Institute (long course) and a 
variety of police management and administration courses. 

Captain B.D. Kruidenier has been a member of this department for over sixteen 
years and has had prior law enforcement experience of over seven years in our 
local area and Cedar Rapids, Iowa. He is currently Commander of Intelligence 
and Vice Division and for over four years was Executive Assistant to the 
Chief of Police. Prior assignments include supervisory responsibilities in 
investigation and police patrol. 

Captain Konrad vonEiff has been continuously employed by this department 
since 1958. He has achieved outstanding success in every aspect of uniformed 
police services including Patrol Commander, Special Events Management, and 
Supervisor of Traffic Enforcement. 

Consultants to be employed in furtherance of project guidance, training and 
■ evaluation will be professionals whose attributes combine extensive related 






# 


- Page 13 - 


f 


experience with full academic credentials in Criminology, Law, Psychology and 
Sociology. Travel and subsistence funds have been requested to permit nation- 
ally recognized experts to participate in our program. 

Instructors who will be utilized in the training portion of this project will be 
the most competent available. It is contemplated that certain areas of instruction 
will be conducted by the professional consultants described above. Selected personnel 
of our own department and other local "mutual aid" agencies will provide additional 
resources in this area. 

The grantee police department employs approximately two hundred fifty (250) sworn 
officers and an additional ninety (90) civilian personnel. Selection and academic 
standards are high, with some forty percent of sworn personnel currently possessing 
associate, bachelor or graduate degrees. 

The City of Miami Beach is a vacation resort area located in sub- tropical south 
Florida. Land area is comprised of approximately 9.5 square miles. Current per- 
manent residential population is 86,000. Our principal industry is tourism and 
conventions. It is reliably estimated that over two hundred thousand visitors 
temporarily reside within our city at all times. 

Unique crime problems occur because of the highly transitory nature of the great 
majority of persons who are present within our city at any one period of time. 

While crimes of force and violence are relatively rare, offenses involving larceny 
and burglary are more numerous, primarily because of the relative wealth of many 
residents and visiters. 

This city achieved considerable recognition as a result of the highly successful 
Republican National Political Convention of 1968, an undertaking in which several 
of our local police departments were totally involved. Most of the police officers 
who provided law enforcement in 1968 are still employed in our organizations. 

We look forward to the experiences 1972 may bring us. 





ii 




h 


■-^ ,3 

■i". 


it. ■ 

#*■ 

-■?J 


m 


DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION PLANNING SUMMARY, FEBRUARY 17, 1972 

REQUIRED ACTION OR ACTION TAKEN 


■' 1 

OLD 

BUSINESS 

* 1 

1 . 

Modified Grant to include contributing 
agencies at time and a half pay. 


2. 

Availability of Beach High School 



facilities. 





3. 

Professor She! low's participation in 

■r’i 


training program. 

M ■ 

4. 

Security of public utility, county- 

Mil 


wide. 

■n- 




5. 

Paging equipment. 


- 6. 

Training for I.D. Personnel; mass 

f 

■•X 


arrests, etc. 

i 

7. 

Candidate Security 


NEW 

BUSINESS 


1. ;, Arrest powers for Miami Officers 

assigned to Miami Beach during Conven- 
tion. 

2. tentative dates for Peoples Party 
Convention. 

3. Number of personnel from other agencies 
to participate in training. 


4. Convention manpower assistance; antici- 
pated need double that of 1968. 


Majon 


p finalize (See No. 3 


under new business), 

Chief to confer with school principal. 



Gas Co. security heads. 

On order. Service to include key people 
in other agencies during Convention. 


jto correspond with 


Captain 

Washingt on. D.C., and othe rs. Ma.ior 


land 


I Ito contact Captain! 

Chief Sandstrom, City of Miami, and County 
I.Di Supervisors, etc. 

Secret Service will be assigned to candi- 
dates as of March 20, 1972. 


In most instances, actual ar rests will 
be by Beach Police. Captain | 
to acquire deputizing forms. 


July 28 through August 4th. 


bo 

b7C 


Miami and Coun ty representatives to advise 
Ma.ior | j reference numbers and pay 

scales by Tuesday, February 22nd, 1972, 
for grant modifying purposes. Classes 
to include 6 Coral Gables Officers, 4 
Highway Patrol, 3 Beverage Department. 
Conservation people should be contacted. 

Miami and County representatives to 
ascertain and advise at future planning 
session. Anticipate 40 from Conservation 
Dept., 50 Beverage Dept, (men and women), 
50 Highway Patrol and undetermined Florida 
Bureau oOaw Enforcement, etc. 

■"/3S 2)-^/ 







2 




Jj' 



5. 





ii 

j 

6. 


7. 

' i . 

CO 

ix < 

In 

n 

9. 

k 

Q 

, p 

10. 

7 ^ 

11. 


Intel! igence 


Acceptable area for camp sites, 
entertaining and forum. 

Inventory of materials. 


Convention security missions to be 
requested of other agencies. 

Manning of Command Post. 


Conference room in conjunction with C.P. 


Conmittee to be formed, all agencies to 
participate. Some time in May, funnel 
information to Secret Service for dissem- 
ination. Names of Intelligence Officers 
to be exchanged at next planning session. 

All planning members requested to research 
and report. 

Request mutual aid agencies to update. 
Liaison officers to initiate. 

To be determined and disseminated. 


Major to contact contributing 
agencies reference C.P. personnel and 
alternates and radio equipment, etc. 


To be constructed in area adjacent to 
and east of Coirmand Post. 


Tentative schedule of Convention sessions at Convention Complex: Monday, July 10th 
through Thursday, July 13th from 7-12 PM. Cutoff time variable. Catch-up meetings 
will be scheduled on an as-needed basis during subsequent afternoons. 


.K 





-- 


m 





Saturday evening, July 8th 
Sunday, July 9th 

Monday, July 10th 

Tuesday, July 11th 

Wednesday, July 12th 
Thursday, July 13th 
Friday, July 14th 


get acquainted party at Convention Hall 
gala event at Playboy Plaza Hotel (nothing at 
Convention Hall.) 

Delegate seating 
Rules Committee 
Key note speech 
Platform (controversial) 

Nomination of candidates 
Held in reserve 
Held in reserve 


The Democratic Party will sponsor an ongoing alternate program each morning, music 
festivals, open forums, etc. for the young, the blacks, etc. who will not have 
admission credentials for Convention Hall. 


12. Theme of Convention Planning Positive outlook. 


13. See attached list of planning session 
attendees and designated convention 
liaison officers. 


NEXT MEETING WILL BE AT 9:00 AM, Thursday, February 24th, 1972, in the Board Room of the 
Garden Center located at the northwest corner of the Miami Beach Convention Complex. 


cr' rr' 













2/15/72 


Aimm* 


mmz 


&ZB39CXOK, mx 
SAC, BUWJB <X00-9301) 


StJBJSCI?; DSIOCBATIC HATIOKAB 
TJOJOTSTIOH 
inmt^ timxxtk 




/6 [j 



Captioned indiiridual vas appointed as the person 
In charge of security for the Pewocratits National Conven-' 

tion to be held at Miaal, Florida, | |took over this 

xxjsitlon officially 1/3/72, and has been traveling through-* 
out the country consulting with Chiefs of Police and other 
appropriate persons regarding security measures to be 
utllissed. 

For the infomatioa of the Bureau and Kia»i, 


I In recent t elephonic converastloa mxxh 
the Hosident Agent at Boaeraan, I _ J informed he has 
already met with personnel of the Miami Office. 

I 1 has made application with the Butte 

Office for the position of special Agent with the IBl. 

I 1 

which encompass^ 

the representatives of Police science prc^rams of of the 


>^ry Bureau <AM) (Keg.) 

im> (Keg.) 

-ia — Butte 

(1 « 67- 

BHB/mhs 

( 6 ) 


r 







m # 3100-9301 


I sy»tm units as well as 

rearesenTaxa.veg iiroa xaree .luator col legeg and two private 
institutions in |. 


In frequent contact with the Butte Office, I 
has always heen coopeiative, shows a definite interest in 
law eiiforceneat, and has indicated a completely coopetative 
effort with the fBI, 


For information. 





OPTIONAL. FORM 1^6. 10 

may 1962 EDITION . 

GSA FPMR (41 CFr) 101-11.6 ^ V. 

UNITED STATES GO^RNMENT 

Memorandum 

* 


TO ; 

SAC, MIAMI (80-1353) 

date: 

2/17/72 

FROM : 

SA 




subject: 

MIDEM 




With regard to local dissemination of pertinent 
information received from other offices concerning the 
Democratic National Convention, the following procedures 
will be followed: 

A Sub A file will be established to contain 
one copy of each item disseminated for ready reference 
in the Miami Office. 

A Command Post file, Sub B, will be established 
to contain one copy of each item for ready reference during 
the Convention. This file will be maintained by the 
No. 3 Rotor until the Command Post is set up at the Convention 
complex, and will be maintained at the Command Post during 
the Convention. Thereafter, it will be destroyed. 

One copy of each LHM pertaining to the convention 
will be disseminated by routing slip to U.S. Secret Service, 
Miami . 


Information in each LHM will be disseminated to 
Miami Beach PD in the form of a blind memorandum, with all 
references to FBI deleted. 

Any additional necessary dissemination to other 
local agencies will be handled orally with appropriate 
notation being made on cover communication maintained in 
instant file. 


In interest of efficiency, it is recommended that 
instant file and its sub sections be maintained on th e 
JNo. 3 Rotor until the convention jrs terminated. 



3 ^syMiami 
Xl> 80-1353) 

80-1353 Sub A) (Local dissemination) 
^a 1 - 80-1353 Sub B) (Command Post) 

JCB/dk 






■b6 

b7C 




.1 :mt\ 

1 ? 

FBI — MIAMI 


rrn 

1 


S. Savings iponds ikfigulariy on the Payroll Savings Plan 




L 


5010-108-01 





FD-3S0 (Rev. 7-16-63) 


(Mount Clipping in Space Below) 



By MIKE WEINSTEIN 
Sun-Rej)srt'erSlSIf Wrilec 

. CalLit optimism,ora‘baief 
that after the last time 
matters must improve. 

But ■ whatever , — 

fiemocratic party officials 
and convention security 
planners^saiclyesterday they 
will; be ready and able to 
handle law enforcement 
proce(iures when Democrats 
gather in Miami: Beach in 
July. j 

. The occasion was an im 
|fpr mational session markinu 
him 'BFgihhing of 'a foun 
|month training program fc| 
•'Beach .police leading, tp- the 
cpnyentiort. 

Richard Murphyv the 
party’s- convention coor- 
dinator> said, the extensive 
JiBihour project 196 hours fop 
each police' officer) -com- 
bined with Miami Beach’s 
“siiccessfui experience”, of 
handling- the ’68 Repubiican- 
convention, will "nearly 
assure the most well- 
prepared security force and 
allow the party to meet its 
three primary objectives: 

-- Peace-and'tranquilityin 
Miami Beach- during the 
convention. 

' -^Orderiy and. deliberative 
* convention so delegates can- 
- make rational decisions 
. about party platform and 
vital choice of , a Democratic 
candidate for presidenti 

—'The right of every 
person, to express his point- of 
view or dissent with 
knowledge that his civil 
liberties will, be protec- 
ted., He added- that 
disturbances which rocked 
the ’68' Democratic- con- 
vention taught the party 
many lessons ' and 
necessitat gd an p. yertiaui in 
pplicies.. ‘ 


‘‘Chicagas'-^'rtnay ihave : 
produced -a failure at -the" 

’ 'balfot box,' ,biit was siic- 
' cessful In .that -it brought - ; 
about reforms, in-converttionr* ■ 
; security procedures an^ , : 
JmethgdsL_ .of electing 
lelegafei,” Murphy ppiiited; 

I >ut- . 

r -‘Welearned'how to handle 
dissent cpnsturctively and 
with -the expertise cf the 
Mianii Beach pclice, we 
foresee- ni eeting tHe party’s 
three- goals,” 

But MuC^hywarned police 
officials to beware of the- 
possibili'ty that dissidents, 
may ‘resQ,r.t .to tactics which 
“besieged.” the J68, affair.,, 

“Following, this- training- 
* L’tn (’onfident'''Security .rniits 
wiltbe>ready, but fcan’t say 
what adv.efsatieslhey might 
face because for others I 
cannot speak,” Mutphy 
commented. 

Baui Rundlev the- con- 
vention's Security Seryic'e 
coordinator, told the 
gathering; in the Ogress 
Room.ot Covention HSIthat 
his departmt-at would 
cooperate in every way- 
possible to ^guarantee an- 
■orderly convention, but said- 
Security Service must sticfe, 
to its designated functipii- 
protection of pr.esid.ential 
and vice- .presidentiai can-, 
didates, •'-■r-r-v 


(Indicate page, name of 
newspaper, city and state.) 


DAILY SUN-REPORTER 


MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA 


2/15/72 


DEMOCRATIC 

NATIONAL CONVENTION 

/ 

Character: 

or 

Classification; 80-1353 
Submitting officeMIAMI, FLA, 

I I Being Investigated 



Charles, Perry, p residenl 
of Florida ' Inter.naiionail 
University, Which is con- 
ducting. the: project in con.- 
junction' with Beach police, 
said training will include 
study of Constitutional and 
statutory laws dealing with 
dissent and demonstration ^ 
ise of sophisticated' cpin| 
f imnications equipme nt an d 
{ he safest whys of'preventinj 
|iisorders. . < 

- He added' the program 
would not only bring stability 
to the convention but also 
benefit Miami Beach in the 
future by “allowing for the 
' development of persons who 
truly understand the 
problem today’s society 
places upon Oiir police of- 
ficers." 


To Be Tlircms* 


Miami Beach wili be 
hosting, more than a, 
Democratic 'National Con- 
vention in July, in fact, the 
^city will: more' ClpseLy 
' resemble a. threerring circus 
with numerous on-going 
events tieddothe-convention. 

At yesterday’s first day 
sessionof thepolicesecurity 
training program,, con- 
vention coordinator Richard 
Murphy gave a brief 
description of the non-stop 
activity which will ac- 
company the big event." 

While night hours will 'be 
occupied by activity .' at 
Convention' Hall, morhihg. 
and daytime hours will 
consist of rock concerts, 
fashion shews and, ac- 
Gordingto 'Murphy, “g little 
something for everybody,.’’ 

Murphy cited several 
reasons for the diverse 
entertainment. being planned 
but focused on .the new breed 
of convention delegates. 

“In the past, convention 
delegates were mostly 
wealthy people and were not 
representative of the 
populace as a whole,” he 


said,. “But thisiyearthe 3,000' 
delegates and 2;000 alter- 
■ nates .will include more 
women, blacks,, yoUng 
people and other minority 
groups than- ever 'before and: 
its our duty to schedule /a 
wide- range of events and 
make'Mianii Beach a place 
they’ll remember.’’ 

An estimated 7,200 
members of the .press; will 
alse be; oh hand. 

While- visitors wilLnot:be at 
a loss for things to do outside 
Convention. Hall, those un- 
fortunates who can’t obtain 
tickets will probably wonder 
what goes ort itiside the hall 
when Democrats, meet. 

Murphy compared the 
upcoming convention, to 1968 
and said it will be livelier; 
and less orderly in con- 
vention, procedure due to, the 
vast changes in party policy 
and noisier because of 
greater influx Of people. 

But he soothed the fears of 
those who recall 1968^s 
debacle by saying the partyi 
learned “a great deal” frorh j 
that-experienceand “wev/ill 
.not have a repeat of it this ] 
year.” 




v<« 

^ OP 


In Reply, Please Refer to 

File No. 176-3 


W CoyjECqfTIAL W 

UNITED STATB«rl)EPA^^ENT OF JUSTICE 

FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 

Miami, Florida 
February 17, 1972 


DICLASSIFICATIOIJ AUTHORITY MRIUID FROH: 

FBI AUTi:j|p.TIC DECLASSIFICATIGH GUIDE 
DATE 



February 


I on February 18, 

1970, was found guilty of anti-riot 
law violations that arose from acti- 
vities during the Democratic National 
Convention at Chicago, Illinois, in 
August, 1968 e X>ending an appeal, he 
was released on bond by the U« So 
Court of Appeals, Chicago, Illinois « 

1972 


I under the auspices of the Student 

Program Council, university of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida, 
was booked as a guest speaker for the evening of Februar y 14, 
1972, at that institutlono A misunderstanding by | \ of 

the amount of the hoaprlum—i^sulted in JERRT RUBIN being 

substituted for him, | | when advised, stated he still 

wanted to appear, had cleared this with JERRT RUBIN, and 
would be at the University to speak on February 11, 1972, 
rather than the originally scheduled date. The honorium, 
which included expenses, was to be $650, 




JERRT RUBIN was found guilty of the same 
charges of anti-riot law violations as 




Exc laddafroa''a«:^mat ic 
downgrlC^ng and decla^&ifp>-vtioH/==^ 


— 




D O 








February 


1972 


Oil FsbifiiSi'y 0j 1972 j dspartsd 

Chicago, Illinois Aboard Eastern Airlines Flight 73, 
destined for Miami, Florida o 

Deputy U. So Marshal 
Chicago, Illinois 
2/9/72 

On the evening of February 9, 1972, | 

arrived at Miami International Airpo rt, Miami, 
lorida. He proceeded to the residence of 


where he would stay w 


I onl i toured Miami 

and Miami Beach, Floridap This included a vis it to the Miami 
Beach Convention Hall, the site for tae f or tfcceming De mocratic 

Natienai Convent ionp In the early evening he met wrbh| — 

Bo'tb. w©x*e lat©r scbcdulGd to ^ttond a aootxjig oi 
"Operation snowplow" at the Center for Dialogue, Miami, Florida 



MM T-3 







ENTIAL 


The SMC is controlled by the 
Sociklist Workers Party (SWP) and 
its affiliate, the Ycnng Sccinlist 
Alliance (YSA)o The SWP has been 
designated pursuant to Executive 
Order 10450 o 


"Operation Snowplow* 
Center lor Dialogue 
Miaai, Florida 


"Operation Snowplow" is a non-political 
coalition of Miaai organizations whose 
purpose is to provide food, shelter and 
Medical services to non— delegate youth 
groups who will come to Miami for the 
Democratic National Conventiono 

MM T-1 



A meetin g of "Operation snowplow* was held on 

at the Center for Dialogue. Miami « Florida 


Aporozimately fifty persons were present » Law enforcement 


agencies were invited to discuss problems that may be encoun 
tered during the National Democratic Conventiono A discussion 


of these matters took place » 

Toward the end of the session, intro- 

duced himselT and commented on what "The Movement" people 


might be expected to 
National Convent iom 

stated that the tentative plan was to estab- 


lish a statewide coalition sometime in 


Tampa, Florida^ The coalition wou 


network o I would function as the coordinator 


ings would be held to discuss a political platform with the 


organizations within 














J 



WMeii tiae ststc^idc coalition has been established, 
a concert would be held in Tampa, Florida to raise funds » 

The tentative date for the concert id Hhrch 4, 1972 o TThe 
Movement" performers and speakers would take part« The 
highpoint would be the appearance of JOHN LENKON of "Beatles" 
famoo The concert trould be a quick, clean affair to pro- 
ject the image of a "good guy" approach. 

The concert in Tampa would again be staged the 
following d a y in Miami Beach, Florida, and would be referred 
to as a political .rally for youth. It would be directed 
t^owardThe problems of old age and aimed particularly at the 
elderly of Miami Beach, JOHN LENNON again would entertain. 


movement o The theme would be that some 20,000 "freaks" from 
Miami would raise money for the elderly. 

The purpose of these concerts and its theme would 
be to establish an effective relationship between the coali- 
tion and the elderly political forces on Miami Beach, Every 
effort would be made to maintain a non-violent, non-political 
atmosphere in order to protect the relationship established 
between the youth culture and the elderly. No revolutionary 
rhetoric would be espoused. Discussions would concern the 
war and its effect on the aged. 

The overall purpose is to establish an image neces- 
sary to insure that an area can be obtained for a third rally 
to be staged during the convention. By building a political 
base with^tfae elderly oh Miami Beach ,~~it might follow that 
they would initiate the pressures for such an area at that 
time, 

commented that the Interama site mentioned 

as a staging ar ea for "Movement" people during the Democrat ic 
National Convention was un satisfactory, tt was too far from 
the convention site, had too many trees, and the terrain was 
too rocky, ^ 


CONFife 


tr' tr' 



confeb>ential 


^reMarked that having developed influence 
and reaped L irun the elderly on iiiaiai Beach, tho third 
rally or **Festival of Life” could be stagedo It was in- 
portant that the first concert not develop into a rock 
festival with its image of a following from the drug 
culture but, rather, as a concert of famous artistso 

stated that the statewide coalition is 
to be established as a political pressure groupo It 
would not become a supply or service function for demon- 
strators who may come to Miami o It would not get bogged 
down in administrative details o It would not be a part 
of the problems characteristic of ’’Algonquin peace Park” 
or the ’’Festival of Lifej” specifically, the service prob- 
lems of food, medical service, housing required, overdoses, 
and the mud which only create a bad image « "Operation 
snowplow” could assume that function« The only service 
that the statewide coalition might partake in is the mar- 
shaling of its own act ions 0 

[also inferred that if they experienced 

difficulty in obtaining a rally site, the ”big guns” might 
be brought in for confrontationo DAYIS said they will nof~ 
be brought in for direct action but for negbtiationo He 
related that the inertia stemming from the 1968 PemocraFic 
Convention was more than enough to carry this out without 
direct action or confrontation with the Establishment in 
the Miami areao It was the inference of| | that a situa- 

tion of hysteria would arise as the Democrats do hot want^" ^ 
another confrontation as happened in Chicago, He remarked, 
however, that if worse came to worse, the program would be 
initiated and quite easily carried out, hopefully because 
of the political base that had already been established with 
the elderly on Miami Beacho 

advised those present that it was important 
for "Operation snowplow” to establish a political unity » 

He remarked that the politics of a demonstration determine 
the tactics of a demonstration and that, in turn, this 
establishes the diipection of the service project <, He 


CONFISffiNTIAL 




CO] 


•ENTIAL 


BE: 


cautioned ^Operation Snowplov** not to fall into the 
danger point of establishing an exaggerated viev of the 
numerical strength of people who night cone to Hiani 
during the tine of the conventiono He advised that a 
confusion in their defined role, whether services or 
political, nust be resolved o He ihfohned those present 
that the political question of an action, neaning the 
politics of that action, is manifested even in the manner 
such as the location of a camp site« The selection of 
such a site is in itself a political statement o 


said it was premature and counterproductive to select 
the campsites now as groups coming in should have that 
decision and "Operation snowplow" would have to inter- 
act with them at that timeo A nother po litical question 
that must be considered, state< j~ I was that of marshals 

who must be able to interact with the police, as well as 
their own people « 


are not pxaanea 


closed by stating the demonstrations which 

^to be violent coulcl , last anywhere froiT 

one to three days at convention timCo The worst he could 


envision would be "Movement" people marching on the Conven- 
tion Hall to present a proclamation and he doubted this 
would occurs 


MM T-1 


l and local activists, following the 

meeting of "Operation Snowplow," met at his uncle’s residence 
in Coral Gables, Florida o The discussion hinged on "the day 
after" which they referred to as TDA^, By that, they meant 
that positive actions and demands were to be made the day 
after inauguration, at which time the President should im- 
mediately call for an end to the war in Vietnam, if it still 
continued to be waged at that times 


t 

i 


be I 

b 7 C I 
b7D ■ 


MM T-1 








MM T-1 


was a guest on Radio Station WBUS**FM> 
Miaiai Beach, Florida, on the late evening of February 11, 
1972 » The program was a ta lk show with questions phoned 
by the listening audience « | 


in his remarks, stated both the Democratic 
and Republican parties were tied to special interests o » » o 
that the atmosphere in the united States now is similar to 
that of France following the Indo-China War o o o o that 
people are not yet in the street but this action could build 
, o p o the people have concluded they are not going to 
survive « „ o o they are in the process of determining what 
ought to be donoo 

Thp youth vote is seeking a way to speak out, but 
the major political parties are not responding* 



be 

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/' 

• 

i 

I 

1 

NTIAL 



bis broadcast y 
ted 
His 
ast 




disjointed and unrelated remarks during 
tended to indicate he may have been u nder som e influence 
and not responding in a lucid manner o | did not ap- 

pear as scheduled at the university of Miami and was 
replaced by JERRY RUB1N« 


hey departed Miami destined 

They 

Hear, a l»6» Mercury four-door 
l!egistration 28W10210o 



traveled in 
sedan, bearing~ 


PROPERTY OF FBI— This document contains neither 
recommendations nor conclusions of the FBlo It is the prop- 
erty of the FBI and is loaned to your agency; it and its 
contents are not to be distributed outside your agency <> 






RE: 


The psspl© in prison should be set freeo 

The U.So is built on a system of private gain 
which causes greed instead of emphasis on social need. 

The power of the people is to get together 
o p e e people are now feeling themselves and wondering 
what is happening and what needs to be done. This new 
consciousness of the country could take a giant leap 
forward. Groups should get together to create. ... 
those who feel the situation is important to change. 

The country is in deep danger . . . . the 
leadership has to change. 

SHIRLEY CHISHOLM, Democratic presidential can- 
didate, speaks to women, to the blacks and to the poor. 
She should receive support. By coming together, in a 
gentle way, we will lift people up all around us and say 
”Yes, this is right." 


Continued by stating there is a need for 
a substance of understanding. We must speak and educate 
in new ways. 

People are returning to the country . . . . 

This is a good thing .... getting back to nature. 

We should have "private and full understanding under full 
skies . " 

People need to take theaiselves more seriously. 
All kinds of resources are needed for the transformation. 


I I in his remarks, also attacked the Texas 

oilmen who, he stated, exploited the nntnral resources for 
their own gain. 


COmgE^IAL 


He commented also that people have a right to 
defend themselves if attacked. That*s what the Black 
Panther Party has done. If people get together, they can 
win and not be subverted. There is a great need for leader- 
ship as presently there prevails an anti- leadership syndrome 


MM T-'l 

— 8 — 



■b7D 


bo 

b7C 




FD-323 (Rev. 11=2^-61. 



In Reply, Please Re^er to 
File No. 176.3 


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 
FEDERAL 3BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 

Miani, FloiMda 

FEB 1 7 1972 


Title 



bo 

-b7C 


Character 

Reference j[g nade to gieaorandum dated 
and captioned as above, at 
Miami, Florida, 

All sources (except any listed helow) whose identities 
are concealed in referenced co Tmtinni cation have furnished reliable 
info imat ion in the past. 


This (document contains neither recommendations nor conclusions of the FBI* It is the property 
of the FBI and is loaned to your agency; it and its contents are not to be distributed outside 
your agency. 





F B I 
Date: 2/17/72 


DECLJ^PIICATIOH AUTHfRITY DERIVED FDOH: 
FBI AUTOMATIC DECLASStFICATION GUIDE 

DATE OZ-09-2012 i 


Transmit the following in 

A I R T £ L 


(Type in plaintext or code) 


Via 


(Priority) 


.L.. 


TO: DlRECrrOR, FBI (176-14ld) 

FROM: 8AC, MIAMI (176-3) (P) 

SAYID TTRE DELLINGER, aka; 

ET AL 

(TRATEL OF DEFENDANTS) 

ARL - CONSPIRACT; 

COC 

(00: C9ICA60) 

ReBtiairtitl to Hiaoi, 2/14/72 < 


eat it led 
able for 


4 - 


EBclosed for the Bur eau are ten copies of an LHM 

I dated 2/17/72 at Miaai, suit- 


diSfleuiAfttldB, 


Bureau (EncolO)(RM) 

(2- 176-1410) 

(1- 105-131719) (ROBIN) 

(1- 100-443916) i I 

Chicago (176-5 Sub C) (Enc<,2) (RM) 

Jacksonville (100- ) (FLORIDA STATEWIDE COALITION) (Ene o 1) (RM)j 

(Info) 

New York (100-15 71781 (R UBIN) (Enc .2) (RM) 

WFO (100-47172)1 | (EBCo2) (RM) 

Ta mpa (Encc.2) (RMT' 

(1-1 ^ (2- FLORIDA STATEWIDE COALITION) 

10 - M±»nl 


(1- 176-3) 

(1- 100-16052) C 


] 


(1- 105-10697) (ROBIN) 

(1- 100-16573 ) (OPERATION SNOy PLQW) 

(l-^ 100- L 





. -) 80-1353) (DEKO N) 




$or!a!!z$d_ 
Rod 






(1- 66-2586) 


(24) 

Approved: 





■bo 

b7C 


Special Agent in Charge 


Sent 


■ M 


Per 


U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1 371 -413-1 3S 


&>-/3S2rm 


...J 






V 




MM 176-3 


Copies ara beiBff furnished Chicago^ New York* _ 
Washington Field Office, and taupa, ©rigin is aatters 
mentioned therein, A copy is being furnished Jacksonville 
for information, 

A copy of this INK is being furnished Wo So Secret 
Service, Miami o 


SOURCES 


mi T^i i« 





MM T-2 is 



Mil T~a 





who furnished information to SA 


who furnished information to SA 


who furnished information to SA 


MM T-4 is 


used to document 


CLASSIFICATION 

The LHM has been classified Copmontial in order 
to protect HH T-1 and MM T-2, who are s^rce^of continuing 
value and whose identities, if disclosed, could detrimentally 
affect the national defense Interests of the United States, 


> 2 ' 





In Reply, Please Refer to 
File No. 


Bufile 100-459971 
NYfile 100-169939 


New York, New York 

February 18, 1972 


DECLASSIFICATION AUTHORITY DERIVED -FROM 
FBI AUTOMATIC DECLASSIFICATION GUIDE 
DATE 02 - 09 -Z 01 Z 


*r« . n ^ 


^ ^ ^ n ^ 4- ^ T-J ^ ^ ^ 


and Justice 


Peoples Coalition for 
Peace and Justice (PCPJ) 

The PCPJ is self-described as an 
organization consisting of over 100 
organizations using massive civil 
disobedience to combat war, racism, 
poverty and repression. Its National 
Office is located at I56 5th Avenue, 

New York City, Room 52?. 

On January 26, 1972, a confidential source, who 
has furnished reliable Information in the past, advised 
that the PCPJ would hold a press conference on January 27, 
1972, at 345 East 46th Street, New York City. Source 
furnished the following PCPJ release that would be dis- 
tributed to the press at the conference on January 27, 
1972; 





declassification , ^ t — , 

This document contains nelthsr recommendations nor 
conclusions of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) . It 
is the property of the FBI and is loaned to your agency^ itand 
its contents are not to distributed 


SERIALIZEO_.,^.^LFD... 


■b6 

to7C 


■ -'PCPJ i^release 

Kopje’S Oialition for ftaa & Justice 

156 nfth Avenue Room 527 New^, Kcw\brk 10010 
212-924-2469 



Contact: Barbara Wfcbster 
Susan Miller 


Phone; (212) Q24-24CD 

MR. NIXON *S PLAN IS NOT NEW 

Last night. President Nixon presented to the American 

people a plan to end the war in Indochina — a plan he claimed 

could end the war now and, lead to, "the speedy return of all 

the prisoners of war to their homes". In reality, Mr. Nixon's 

plan can accomplish neither of these ends . i 

The People's Coalition for Peace and Justice, organizers ' 

of every major national demonstration against the war in | 

Indochina including the Mayday demonstrations in Washington • 

last Spring, finds no pew elements in Mr. Nixon's proposal 

which might lead to a political settlement and a return of 

P.O.W.'s to their families. Speaking on behalf of tne Executive 

Committee of the People's Coalition for Peace ana Justice, 

Susan Miller and George Vickers (Executive Co-Secretaries of ■ 

I 

the coalition) made the following remarks: 

I 

"President Nixon has proposed an exght point 'peace' 
plan to end the war in Indochina. He claims that this plan 
has been offered to the North Vietnamese in private meetings,' 
and that they have ignored it. He also claims that this plan 
shows that the United States has offered to set a date for , 

the withdrawal of all U.S. forces from Indochina and the ' 

return of P.O.W.'s, and that the North Vietnamese have 
deceived the American people by speaking publicly of peace 
while they privately refuse the terms on which peace is possible. 

"We say that Mr. Nixon's plan is a fraud which does not 
satisfy the desire of the American people for an end to the 
killing, for the return of our troops, and for the release of 
the prisoners of war. Ever since Mr. Nixon took office, t.- 



PCPJ 


C 0 N F 



E N T I A 


- 2 - 


^or movement has put forth consistently the necessary 

tionc for pccrc Tr./ir.r'Vi-i na and for a return of all 
.w.'s. Those conditions have not been met by last nivjhc's 
ch, and we repeat them today: 

1. Set the Date, Mr. President — The Nixon Administration 
must set a date certain for the total withdrawal of 
all U.S. forces and equipment from Indochina. Only 
after that date is set can a political settlement be 
reached to free all P.O.W.'s. Mr. Nixon's 'new' 
proposal only repeats the position he has taken for 
over a year that the U.S. will set a date after 

a political settlement is achieved. 

2. Stop the Bombing, Mr. President — The Nixon Adminiii’trati 
must stop the massive air war against the peoples ot 
Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam. Mr. Nixon's 'new' plan 
says nothing of the B52 raids which are staged 

bases in Thailand and Guam, and nothing ot the Ciaily 
jet st-rikes from aircraft carriers in the Inaoch.-na 
sea. Instead he calls for a cease fire throughout 
Indociiina which would leave in power client regimes 
of the U.S., and at the same time leave us free to 
continue the air war. 

3- End Support for the Thieu Regime, Mr. President— The 
Nixon Administration must end its political, military, 
and financial support for tht Thieu government in 
order that a coalition government can be formed to 
bring a political settlement to South Vietnam. Mr. 
Nixon's 'new' plan calls for a new election within 
the political framework of the Thieu regime. Her.-} 
can there be free elections in South Vietnam so 
long as all the opposition forces in the South are 
jailed by General Thieu? Leaders of this opposition 
such as Truong Dinh Dzu, Mme. Ngo Ba Thanh, and 
Huynh Tan Mam — along with hundreds of their follcwerc — 
remain in jail. Others,, like Ngo Cong Due, are 
hunted by the police, and the National Liberation 
Front remains outlawed. Opposition newspapers hoV'S 
been closed down, and General Thieu maintains a 
national police force of 120,000 men under his 
command to suppress political dissent. 

In reality, Mr. Nixon's proposal for an inde- 
pendent election body to supervise the elections is 
the same as the proposal for a mixed electoral 
commission that President Thieu has made fox the 
last two years. It is a body which would exist 
under, and be a creature of, the existing political 
and administrative framework of the Thieu regime. 

Thieu' s resignation one month before the election 
would not affect his control of the outcome. 


more 


C 0 ^ 


T D E N 



release 

Ropier coalition fbrftace & Justice 

ISGFifth Avenue Room 527 Wew^wk, NewYork 10010 
21^-924*2469 




“This ■ e i ciht- point proposni of President Nixon only 
reemphasizes what has been obvious to the American people 
the bankruptcy of the ‘ vietnami-zation policy. After all 
the rhetoric, about 'fairness' and the pursuit of peace throuah 
every channel, what emerges from Mr. Nixon's speech most 
clearly is his unwillingnes. to make a genuine offer for 
peace because he realizes that the Thieu regime continues to 
survive only through the massive support of the United States. 
While he accuses the antiwar movement in this country of being 
misled by the North Vietnamese, the record which he himself 
admitted to last night shows that it is Mr. Nixon who is 
misleading the American people. 

"The way to peace in Indochina and to the return of 
American PiO.W.'s remains what it has been since the day Mr. 

Nixon took office — Setting a date for the complete withdrawal 
of all U,S. forces and equipment from Indochina, an end to 
Vietnamization and the bombing, and an end to U.S. support 
for the Thieu regime. Only then can we truly achieve, "a 
peace that can last"" 

Other members of the Executive Committee include David 
Dellinger of Liberation magazine, Al Hubbard of Vietnam 
Veterans Against the War, Paul Mayer of the Harrisburg Defense 
Committee, Pauline Rosen of ‘Women Strike for Peace, Carol 
Kitchens of Mayday, and Gil Green of the ,^mmunist Par^ . 

C 0 N PXfE W T I A L 


_ 4 _ 



PCPJ 



During December ^ 1970, a second confidential 
source, who has fur nished reliable Infor- 



COLIPAM 


GOLIFAM is publicly known as an organization 
based in New York City that has in the past 
been engaged in transporting correspondence 
between United States Prisoners of War in 
North Vietnam and their families in the United 
States . 


David Dellinger 

On February l8, 1970, David Dellinger was 
found guilty in the United States District 
Court, Northern District of Illinois, Chicago, 
Illinois, for violation of the Federal Anti- 
Riot Law for traveling in interstate commerce 
from outside the State of Illinois with intent 
to incite riots in Chicago during the 
Democratic National Convention in August, 

1968. on February 20, 1970, he was sentenced 
to five years imprisonment and fined $5,000. 

On February 28, 1970, the United States Court ■ 
of Appeals, Seventh Circuit, Chicago, ordered 
him released on $25,000 bond. 

■ Liberation Magazine 

"Liberation" magazine, an independent monthly, 
is published in New York City. Since its in- 
ception in 1958, it has printed "anti-establish- 
ment" articles written by individuals supporting 


b6 

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5 



PCPJ 


CON 


D E N T I A L 


•world-wide conununism, black militants 
and New Left radicals. Dave Dellinger , 
leading figure in the New Left Movement 
is the editor. 

Vietnam Veterarib Against thp. War (W AW) 

The WAW is a national veterans organization 
with a national office located at 25 West 
26th Street;, New York CUy. Its first 
published objective is "to demand an immediate 
cessation of fighting and a withdrawal of all 
American troops from Indochina". 

Harrisburg Defense Committee (HDC)^ also 
known as the Defense Committee 

The "Village Voice," a New York City weekly 
newspaper, issue of February 4, 1971^ page 
36, ■ in a news story entitled, "Berrigan 
Defense," reported that "the only defense 
committee authorized by Father Phillip 
Berrigan, Dr. Eqbal Ahmed, Sister Elizabeth 
McAllister, Father Neil McLaughlin, Anthony 
Scoblock and Joseph Wendroth, all indicted 
by the Justice Department for an alleged 
kidnapping and bombing plot, is the Defense - 
Committee. " 



- 6 - 


■b6 

b7C 

b7D 




E N T I A L 

Womens Strike for Peace (WSP) 

The WSP is a national womens organization 
which has in the past participated in 
demonstrations against nuclear testing, the 
war in Vietnam and the draft. 

May Day Collective (MDC) 

The MDC is publicly known as an organization 
that organized and participated in demonstrations 
in Washington, D.C. during the first week in 
May, 1971 , sponsored by the PCP J. 



DuringL 

source 


identified 


1 the third confidential 


Special Agents of the Federal Bureau of Investigation 
(FBI) observed the PCPJ Press Conference held in the first 
floor auditorium at 3^5 East 46th Street, Nevj York City, on 
January 27, 1972, between 11:10 a.m. and 11:50 a.m. About 
twenty-five persons attended. On the stage facing the^ 
audience were Cora Weiss, professor Richard Falk of Princeton ^ 
University, Princeton, New Jersey, George Vickers, Richard 
Fernandez, and an unidentified white male in the garb of 
a clergyman who acted as master of ceremonies . 


The second confidential source advised 


Richard Falk 

The "Globe and Mail", a newspaper published in 
Toronto, Ontario, Canada in its issue of May 12, 
1970,-identified Richard Falk, Professor of 
International Law at Princeton University as 
the Chairman of the Consultative Council of 
the Lawyers Committee on American Policy Toward 
Vietnam. 




PCPJ 


C 0 N F 


E N T I A L 


Lawyers Committee on American ' 

Policy Towards Vietnam 

The Lawyers Committee on American policy 
Towards Vietnam is a group of lawyers who 
came together in the Summor of 3 9^? 
prepare a legal brief which deals with the 
illegality of American intervention in 
Vietnam. This brief is based on the National 
law and constitutional law aspects of this 
intervention. 



CALCAV is a publicly acclaimed group of 
clergy and laymen concerned about the war 
in Vietnam. 


Cora Weiss read parts of a press statement issued 
by the PCPJ which was an answer to the speech of President 
Richard M. Nixon on January 25? 1972, on peace initiatives 
of the United States Government to bring a negotiated 
settlement to end the war in Vietnam. Weiss stated that 
the eight points presented by the President contained 
nothing new and that in order to obtain peace the President 
must set a certain date for total withdrawal of all United 
States forces and equipment from Indochina. Weiss 
emphasized that only after the date is set can a political 
settlement be reached in Vietnam. Weiss also stated that 
other necessary conditions for peace are that the United 
States must immediately stop the bombing in Indochina 
and must withdraw its support of the regime of President 
Thieu of South Vietnam. 



b6 

■b7C 

b7D 


- 8 - 




PCPJ 


CON 


E N T I A L 


Professor Richard Falk spoke. He stated that 
the so-called new peace initiatives were nothing new, 
th^t they are a re-hash of proposals that go back to the 
time of President Lyndon a. Johnson in th«+ they would 
continue in power the current government of South Vietnam. 
The new proposals contain "no power sharing formula after 
a cease-fire "« A search for a settlement must include a 
sharing of power and it is only after that is agreed 
upon can there be talk of a cease-fire. This demand of 
the National Liberation Front of South Vietnam has not 
been met, Falk stated that the Vietnamization of the war 
policy of the Nixon regime has failed in Vietnam although 
it has to some extent pacified the minds of the American 
people . 

George Vickers announced the following "actions" 
planned by the "peace forces" in its continuance of the 
struggle for fJeace. 

February 11-13, 1972; A large number 
of Americans will participate in the 
World Peace Conference in Paris, France. 

February 20, 1972: A demonstration at 

the airport from which President Nixon _ 
will depart for Peking, Peoples Republic 
of China. 

April 2-4, 1972: "Peace forces" in the 

East will converge on Harrisburg^ Pennsylvania, 
to demonstrate on behalf of the 'Harrisburg 
Eight*’^ defendants . 

April 15, 1972: Local demonstrations will 

be held throughout the United States to 
protest the use of tax payers dollars to 
continue the war in Vietnam. 



- 9 - 


PCPJ 



Early May, 1972: A series of decentralized 

demonstrations will be held against United 
States corporations producing weapons for 
war which will culmn’nate in a large non- 
violent civil disobedience t3rpe demonstration 
at a place and date as yet undecided. 

July and August, 1972; Demonstrations will 
take nia.ce at the Democratic Party National ' 
Convention, Miami, Florida, and the Republican 
Party National Convention, San Diego, 

California . 

A1 Hubbard spoke . He stated that 1he speech of 
President Nixon presupposed that the United States had a right 
to intervene in the war in Vietnam. Also, the president's 
speech showed the effect that the peace movement has had 
on his actions as he appeared to be on the defensive. The 
PCPJ will during the next few months present a solid scenario 
of information on the war that the President is trying to 
keep secret. 

Hubbard mentioned that repression of the anti- 
war forces in the United States continues, as illustrated 
by the recent arrest in Florida of a regional coordinator 
of the WAW on trumped-up charges of kidnapping and 
extortion. 


Rita Handman who mentioned she was from the WSP 
spoke. She stated that the WSP had met on the previous 
day and agreed to present a paper pointing out that President 
Nixon is stalling on the peace issue. She mentioned that 
thirteen members of the WSP would participate on the World 
Peace Conference in Paris . 

Paul Mayer spoke. He stated that President 
Nixon's war politlcies parallel the increase of repression 
in the United States. He complemented the President on 
his ability to make "non-issues" out of real issues such 
as the war through the clever use of Madison Avenue rhetoric. 
Mayer accused the United States Government of attempting to 



10 


PCPJ 


C 0 N E N T I A L 


discredit the peace movement, particularly the "Catholic 
Left" by making it appear that those in the movement are 
terrorists . 

Richard Fernandez spoke. He stated that the 
peace movement deserves credit for drawing attention to 
the lack of credibility of the Nixon administration. He 
pointed out the exposures of the "Anderson Papers" as 
the latest example of this lack of credibility. Fernandez 
stated that the American people are lied to daily by the 
government and as a result many people do not trust their 
government or institutions. 

The press conference eneded at 11:50 a.m. No 
incidents were noted. 

A copy of this memorandum is being disseminated 
to the Secret Service, New York C?ty. 



CON 


D E N T I A L 



■o» 


Transmit the following in 
AIRTEL 


TO: 

FROM; 
SUBJECT : 


(Type in plei.ites 


(e-io it j} 

DIRECTOR^ FBI ; 

SAC 5 NEW YORK (100-l6: S5S ) 

PEOPLES COALITION FOS PF/.CS 
AND JUSTICE (PCPJ) 

IS -NEW LEFT 
(00;NY) 

ReNYtels, 1/27/72. 


Enclosed for the Bur 'if r- /r- 
captioned and dated as above cc^.c iri ' 
held by the PCPJ at NYC on 1/27/7“-:. 

Appropriate copies of tlw I 
listed offices based on the coiii.en'^rj 

2 - Bureau (Ends. 10) (RM) 

2 - Atlanta riOO- 8528) fPCPJ^ (Ir d. . 
( 1 - 100 - ) (| 

2 - Miami (100- ) (PCPJ) (Irol - 

(1-100- ) (DEMOCPvATIC C0I777 .jT: 

3 - Newark f 100-5 2i}-lQ^ fPCPJ^ (E nd? 

( 1 - 100 - ) 

( 1 - 100 - ) ( 

2 - Philadelphia (100-51b32T~TItic J .. 

(1-100- ) ( j I 

2 - San Diego (100- ) (PCPJ) (v 

(1-100- ) (CALREP) 

1 - Washington Field Office (100*551':, 
1 - New York 

JFMtlh 


ApprnvpH • ' 


Spec/( 

Agent i 


Sent ... 





NY 100-169939 
COPIES CONTINUED 


1 - New York 
1 - New York 
1 - New York 
1 - New York 
1 - New York 
1 - New York 
1 - New York 
1 - New York 
1 '.- New York 
1 - New York 
1 - New York 
1 - New York 


; 100-159735 
(100-173317 
100-174537 

100-1216 (d. 
100-170991 
100-7976) [ 

100 - 17441 ^ 

100-13472) ( 
100 - 128457 ) 
^100-85686) 
’ 100 - 146684 ) 


(WSP) 


; 105-19622) (WORLD PEi 




NY 100-169939 


Sources utilized are as follows : 


First source 
Seconfi source 
Third source 


The encloaed LHM is classifiec ’T! o Iti 1 - 
to protect the identities of the confidential infornarits 
oi cpntiiming. value utilized in the LI#!, The unauthorized 
disclosure of the identities of these informants could 
ioipair their future effectiveness. This could be pre- 
judicial to the national defense interests of the tJoo 


SAS 


knd JOHN F, MA.HER observed 


the PCPJ Press Conference on 1/27/72 o 


A copy of instant LHM to be disserainated to 

Secret Service in NYGo 






TO: DIRECTOR, FBI 

(ATTENTION; IDENTIFICATION DIVISION) 

FROM: SAC, MIAMI (32-0) 

SUBJECT; MIAMI BEACH POLICE DEPARTMENT 
MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA 
IDENTIFICATION - 
FINGERPRINT MATTER 


On February 18, 1972, Chief of Police ROCKY POMERANCE, 
Miami Beach Police Department, advised that his Identification 
Section has a backlog of some 6,000 civilian registration 
fingerprints v?hich have been taken of persons Tsorking on 
Miami Beach. These fingerprints have been taken based on 
a City Ordinance passed in 1935 which permits the Miami Beach 
Police Department to take fingerprints of persons employed 
on Miami Beach. He stated since July, 1971, as the Bureau 
is aware, the Miami Beach Police Department has been unable 
to submit these fingerprints to the Identification Division 
due to a ruling by U. S. District Judge GERHARD GESELL, which 
prohibited the FBI from disseminating Identification Records 
outside the Federal Government. POMERANCE pointed out that 
the greater majority of persons fingerprinted are employees 
of hotels and restaurants on Miami Beach. He stated he is 
very much concerned with the fact that these fingerprints 
have not been processed through the Identification Division 
inasmuch as many of these persons will be employed during 
the coming Democratic National Convention. He stated that 
any one of them could be a security risk to the various 
nominees and delegates and that it would be tragic if anything 
occurs and it develops 

3 - Bureau (RM) 

2 - Miami (1 - 32-0) 

(1 - 80-1353) 

JPM:mel 
(5) 





MM 32-0 



prior criminal record. Chief POMERANCE pointed out that 
he has been appointed Director of Security fdr the Democratic 
National Convention by Governor HSDBIN ASKEIf. POHEMNCE 
stated he vould lifee to urgently request the PBI, Miami, 

iithti-hauoi/* 1-t nniilri tft hnvA 1 nss+ant. finp^ernrints 

processed through the Identification Division.^ He stated 
he has conferred with H. S. Secret Service regarding this 
problem and they agree with him. ’ 

On February 18, 1972, Special Agent in Charge 
ROBERT NEWBRAND, XJ. S. Secret Service, Miami, advised that 
his office and the security detai l for the Democratic National 
Convention are greatly interested in 

having fingSfpfints of eapioyses of restaurants and hotels 
on Miami Beach fingerprinted so that their prints may be 
checked through the Identification Division for prior criminal 
record. He stated this would be extremely important to 
U. S. Secret Service and their protective assignment. 


On February 18, 1972, Captain] j 

Identification Division, Miami Beach Police Department, 
advised that his department’s authority for fingerprinting 
civilian registrants is based on a City Ordinance passed 
in 1935 and as far as he knows there is no state statute. which 
permits such fingerprinting. 

On February 22, 1972, Assistant Special Agent in 
Charge JAMES O’CONNOR, Jacksonville FBI, telephonically 
advised that his office had checked with the office of Florida 
State Attorney General ROBERT SHSVIN regarding current Florida 
Statutes regarding fingerprints. None of them cover the 
fingerprinting of hotel and restaurant employees in a local 
municipality. He stated the only possihRity might be in 
Section S61 of the Florida Statute which states that any* 
person, firm or corporation involved in the mnufacturing, 
bottling, distribution, selling or in any way dealing with 
alcoholic beverages must be fingerprinted. O’CONNOR stated 
information regarding current Florida Statutes regarding 
f ingeprinting was furnished the Bureau by Jacksonville airtel 
dated February 16, 1972, captioned ”Non-»Foderal Applicant 
Fingerprint Cards”. 

Bureau is requested to advise if they can accept 
fingerprint cards from Miami Beach Police Department in 
accordance with the wishes of Chief POMERANCE in view of the 
security needs with respect to the coming Democratic National 
Convention. 


— 2 


■bo 

b7C 



. F3-350 (Rev, 7-16-63) 


(Mount Clipping in Space Below) 



A police spokesman 
today disclosed that the , de- 
partment has applied fbr a 
.fIdd.MO federal ^nt to, pay 
^lor riot control Weapons and 
training which might be 
needed during the Democrat- 
ic National Convention , this 
summer.' 

The spoftesnian, a top 
ranking aide to Miami Police 
Chief Bernard Garmirej Said 
the department applied .for 
the grant Feb; 11 iii -a letter 
to- the iiaw Enforcement As- 
sistance Adminisrration of 
the U.S, Department of Jus- 
tice. 

The applicationi sai«k 
requested $131440 l?|estab- 
Jish'workshOps for Miami po- 
lice which woul0 ‘‘focus: on 
the appiicatidn of psydho-so- 
Cial skills and understandings 
to prevent an escalation (of 
confrontations) to viplence;” 

In addition, he said, the 
grant asked for $2S'000 
tyoirtn of sophisticated, non- 
lethal riot control hardware, 
including tear gas grenades, 
tear gas. launchers, "stun 



(Indicate page, name of 
newspaper, city and state.) 


CHiEFGARMiRE 

- I 

guhs,” add elongated wooden 
truncheons. 


political groups intending to 
demonstrate and protest” 
during the convention from 
July 9 to 14. 

‘ihe police,, he explained, 
were concerned that “theilihr 
erai-ofiented groups*’ .would 
stage protests,dit the cMyiim-! 
its, and "we felt that we 
should bO prepared'topfotect 
the. city of Jviiami.” 

The spokesman pointed :6ut 
that the police on Miaijii 
Beach have, received a half- 
minion dollar, grant from the 
LEAA to prepare themselves 
for large-scale protests. 

The spokesman, who: aSked 
that he-not be identified, said 
Miami police are not now 
well trained in .controlling a 
crowd in a peaceful, hon-vio- 
tent manner. 

In theit application to 
•EhAA^, he saidi ffie police 
said- "we have little expeti* 
eneg in control of nnlawfiil 
conduct with jaihiimai force 
using non-deadly skills and 
■weapons” and added that the 


MIAMI NEWS 


Miami, Florida 


The police spokesman said eneg in control of' iinlaWftd 
the department explained in ‘ conduct wim iphiimai force 
. its application that it needs bsing non-deadly skills and 
federal funds to prepare for weapons” and added that the 
an "influx of ‘‘liberai-oitented ptopi^fed police- training, pror 
■"gram would teach “the appli- 
cation of rtomdeadiy re- 
sponse methods M the event 
of violent and uhlawfui be-> 
havior.” 


Date: 2/23^/71 


Edition: 


Title: democratic 
NATIONAL convention 


Classlfloatlon: gQ-ISSS ' 
Submitting OfflcJ: ^ FLA. 

r~1 Being Investigated 



■i. 



i 


A part of th'e Irani, the 
sriokesmati conlMtaed, would 
be used to purchase a smau 
arsenal of fiot cdnttdl equip- 
ment and to train policehien. 
in the use of thesedevices. 

Among the weapons he 
said were requested are: 75 
wooden batons; ranging froift 
.24 to 36 inches in length, 150 
“flame-proof dust GS gas 
grenade's,” and 20 gas gre- 
nade iauncherf. 

Other weapons requested 
irtehides flack vests;, ga§ 
masks, a smoke generator 
and l;0fl0 plastic handcuffs,, 
as wen as iO’ *^stuh guns” 
wkiclif'ite bedh bags aiid,.ac- 
cording to the spokesman, 
"hit with the fofce Of a fast- 
pilch ijaseljaiU” ^ 

Besides the weapons, the j 
police also, requested several : 
other items, the spokesman , 
said, including photographic 
eoUippierii, wkich, he' Sard; , 
would be used “to. filtn-.prob- 
lem areas and that sort of 
thing,“ ^ - 

Ih addition; he said, police 
asked fot Several -“tfaffling ' 
films ” -to- show at theit ^prdv 
posed' workshops. The fil.ms 
depict scenes frottl the civil 
disorders in Watts in 1965, to 
Detroit in. 1967 andin Ghica- 
'■ go in 196^> the ' Spokesman ■ 
noted. 

The type of LEAA graht 
which the city police ate re- 
questing is; a partial match- 
ing graht, the police -spOkeS- 
liiart said, and the police have 
told the LE&A that they ate 
prepared to put up‘i$69il'43'of 
their Own money for the 
training projec ts we'ap- 
onspiirdhasSK" ’ 


i 

I 


( 


( 


'FD-350 (Rev. 7-16-63) 


(Mount Clipping in Space Below) 




‘ IfoclcyPomera^^ 

■ ! Heavy set,, affabl^ '■ . 4 - 

BplicS chief ofMi^ifii Beach. 

In- July.lig wiir;b^;'pa^p,Ult|d':for a weelc. 

; intO;;pdsitioh' aa dneitdf the m|st important 
irien. in .the nation. " . I / 

His. cafeerwas' raimcHea 22. years ago ■ as. 

' a young, officer walking, a- beat oii: Liiicola 
Rpadand' wearing ati #m batld proclaiming; 

, ‘‘Hahlo Espanoii’' , | • > 

,It will' be R6ckj| Pomerance’s job; this 
asuramef to guard theicdnvendbd,cbippIp^,jgO 
I insiire the safety ottoe deleMteg. and vwi": 

, tors and to TriaKe s^g .tiiat cpnfrqnla^^ 
i tionastay within;pres,crlb0 lliiife ; I 

....... .if,- . 


nt -io the S^ecret. SttCr 

I vice' to guard the .candldlteSi'iBeach police 
\ will augrtient the' Service Service it request; 

1 ed.), ' 

{ Pomerance already i^4,bybHij|i;by niSi eS- 
i tbnate “a 'baif ofdveiy day todheiemocrat- 
1 ^convention.’’ ■ , - 

‘ - The mati with the twinkling eyea was . 

, born May 20, i92f^ |n the- Bnonkj-H.Y.,- as.' 
ArnoIdiPomerancej somof dwaiter., - 

“It was thekindof tough.nelg.hhorhood;’* ■ 
Pomerance says today, "yhefe you- just 
didn’t grow -up.’ — yoU-surviyed;” ItitvastKen 
. he became known as "Ro(^’’' to plajroates 
and street gang adversaries because^bf Ms 
ability to -handieMs flsfs.- « - • 

Rocky WaSitheryoungeSfe of^-liitee .cliil- 
dfen.!A,brothef,;Maimyi5,is^^^ 

Mewairl^ N.J. A sts'terj, Mrs.-;Lili|an ■-Kahn^’ 

' lives with .Her ittother at thdRorte.TowerSi 
Mami'Beachi, ' ■ 

, • The-father .died .when Rocky’wan’S-'y.ears;- 
dld. 5t was tte: height, of thg depreSsionuin ! 
■1932 an(i AustrianrHoffr MoiUe;.;p6fitienance-< 
was-jl.eft ,praeti?aiiy ,pgnniiess'..,wJ|M!th,re’e.;i 
..cbiidrenj;,,* ’ ■ , r‘: . . f "'■"‘C' Cj 

i 't^eror-v\rns.-4bsufancei J’y|; .beertrtoM;',’'; 
i teininlsced Fpmerence5'‘'bUt;R was-thef-liMii; 

[ -,i tbe^p^meM^'^qr^Wede ntg ekly.^ A iidj if-:; 
yd 1 inisSed a couple weeks, the; polic| 
iva s.canceled. ' * 

■■"When- ray father became ill, he tpissed 
the payniehtS -=-:rafid thatwas;thafc" 

Manny, then 15; and' IT-year-old Lillian 
went to work. Their mother saW fo . the- chil- 
dren’s morat and chafactef development. 

“Maybe the fact that I became^a poliee- 
mah came froni the -deep, sense of respectfor 
the'law -which- our, mother aiways-instUledih. 
ail of usikidsj^aysFomerdqce. . . 

MommM^straight and norrbw yiew 
jprobahly wettt a -loiig way to keep young, 
Rocky’s-nose-ln the hooks, too. He graduate 
ed' Valedictorian from !^blio School 6 in the 
Bronx Und then went to Eyander Childs - 
• High School; 'working after school, dnd 
'weekendsiin a.m'achine shop. 

Me made A’s. 
in school 

He was straight “A” all the way and 
graduated from high school in -three and 
one-halfyears atthp age of 16. 

Those were the war years and; by 1943; 
Manny Poraeranpe Was in the NaVy in the 
North Atlantic. Liilian Was. married and liv- 
ing iii Homestead where her .liu.sband'had.an 
Qrangagraye., , ,, 


(Indicate page, name of 
newspaper, city and state.) 

1-A 


MIAMI JEWS 
MIAMI, FLORIDA 


Date: 2/19/72 
Edition: 

Author: 

Editor: 

Title: democratic 
NATIONAL CONVENTION 

I 

Character: 

or 

Classification: 80-1353 
Submitting Office: MIAMI, FLA. 

, { } Being Investigated 



I 


( 


( 


i 




It was thegJilajHm^a, fiomerance picked! 
up her remaining child and moved td the' 
Miami area to be near her daughter. 

Rocky was 16 and trying to niake the 
days go faster to his 17th birthday and en- 
listment in theKaval AirCorpff. 

He didn’t quitesmake it. 

T» TQA4 pn.«„a„,,o ^ 

every physical and mental test with flying 
colors — alraosf. Color peteeption flunked 
him out. 


But it was the Merchant Marine for the, 
adventuresome young man the next day. 
Within a month he was aboard i high-oc- 
tane tanker in the Pacific. 

The end of the war fdund Pomerance in 
Saipan, He returned home and within a fews 
months joined the Arttiy. He was stationed 
stateside and a year later was hondrabiy dis- 
charged. 

Boxing w^js hobby 
in -‘the Army 

While in the Army, Pomerance, using; his 
Rocky nickname, boxed in inter-company 
and inter-battalion prize fights. 

‘The, prize,” he recalls, “was a steak dihr 
ner and a three-day pass to, the nearest 
town.” 

After discharge from the Army^ Pomer- 
worked as a mailman In Miami Beach 
until he joined the police force on Jan. 1, 
1950,. and was given the ahnband which ad- 
vertised his- ability to speak Spanish. , 

He studied Spanish in high school, but is 
tne-first to admit now that it was his time in 
the- Merchant Marine, with. ‘its periods- 
ashore in such ports :as; Panama — with its- 
recreational” facilities — that sharpened- ' 
his Idiom in the vemaculat. jt 

In his first stint with the police depai«L 
ment, Pomerance stayed six arid one-hair* 
years, rising to the grade -of detdctive. Them 
he resigned to run jor constable in district 
5, embracing Miami Beach and the oceans 
front communities and Unincorpofated areas 
reaching to the Broward line. He won. 

It was at this time that he becarhe- 
•Rocky” legally. 

Wpen he qualified to run for office he 
was tord that nicknames were not permitted 
on the ballot. So he went to-court' and- ob- 
tained an order ^ apd “Arnold”' quietly dis- 
appeared. 

Now'he’s “Rocky” to everyone -r— except 
to his 84-year-old mother, who still calls 
him “Arnold.” 


Running for re-election as constable four 
years later, he had no opposition. It was the 
first time in the history of the district that 
the incumbent was not faced with opposi- 
tion for reelection. 

Mike Fox, who had been in the drapery 
business, was then Miami Beach chief of po- 
lice, a post to which he was, named by the 
then-City Man ager -Claud e Renshaw. 


He was pushed 

for new post . . , 

; quarters it wag felt tbat Mi aipf. 

Be acli should ha ve a “pro f esaohal” Taw itP 
fcj ‘cement officer at the top of its force aiidj 
Pomerance, who by this time had achieved] 
considerable political "clout, was pusiieu' 
for the post. 

In the middle of his second term as con- 
- stable, in 1963, Pomerance was named chief 
oTpolice despite opposition of City Manger 
O. M; (Jim) Pushkin,, who had succeeded 
Renshaw. 

. Upon his appointment as chief, Pomer- 
'..ance resigned his constaBle*,s.jDb in the mid- 
dle of his second term. Gov. Farris Bryant, 
narned to the post Leonard Weinstein’, who 
is rip-w a Miami Beach city councilman and! 
thus, nominaily, one of Pomerance’s bosses, ' 
still thn“cop-bn. the beat” oii Lin- : 
coin Road,. Poniefance married Hope Marie: 
Nason, a clerlcin a Lincoln, Road shop, i 


They have three children, — Ken, 18; 
Jimmy, 16, and- victoria, ii. Name changing 
apparently runs- in the 'Pomerance family. 
Victoria actually was named Vicl^ on her 
birth: certificate and she wm happily Vicky 
until' she wasseven .years old. 

Then she told her parents, in the, preco- 
cious manner of some 7-year-oids that 
"Vicky”’was. not a propOr name and it 
shOuid be “Victoria.” Her parents- obligingly ; 
wrote to fhe school authorities and Vicky 
became Victoria iir -much the same manner 
as- Ajnpid became Rocky. 

I The Pomefahces live -.comfortably |t 
4p3 Alton Rd, in a rambling nine-foofa 

Stucco home. The two-story house is “Spa’ft- 
iah Mediterrahian” of the style popular in 
Miami -Beach boom times. 

Sharing the- home is Patrick, a German 
shepherd born in- 1970- on St. Patrick's Day. 

“We bought the house, a -few years ago,”' 
H op e Pomerahce related, "when you 
couldn't give them away. 'We’ve added' to it | 
and! rooms, go, off in. every direction, as you 
can-see. We.made- the garage into a rOom for 
thejboys.” 

The house is furnished in what Mrs.. 
Pomerance calls “early attic” period. <‘Some 
of the pieces are old and-soine are new. All 
-iVe. require ip that -they he comfortable.” 


The POmerances are a close-knit family, 
Very few people know (because they’-re hotj 
up that early) that sometimes Victoria and 
her father steal out -of the house in the early 
morning hours, when it’s still dark, and go 
to the 46th Street oceanfront just to watch 
the sun rise ovef'fHBVCfMhtic. 



Washingfon^ ^ I 

cominufer ! 

Although it’s rough these days, while 
maintaining practically a regular comrahtgr 
schedule to Washington, to consult with the 
tiifficials concerned . with 'the -conventioiv 
i omerance tries to ssend every .poss ily 

n ihute with ills wife .an* children when he» 
i4 Miami 'ieach, . ^ 

On two recent visits to Washington-, he 
took Ken on- bne, trig and Jimmy oh the sec^^ 
ond. Victorians turn is next. In recent weefcsj 
Pomerance has averaged three trips a month 
to the ngtion'sicapital. 

Because of hi? reluctaiice to spertdtime 
away from, his family, he- sometimes -takes, 
ah; 8 : 30 ’ aim, flight to Washington and te^ 
turns home on a 5:30 p.m. flight the sama 
day. 

And, while convention preparatioiisiHaVe 

affected the entire faihily, :Mrsi Pomerance. 
finds time along With Jiousehold duties to do 
television comihercials -^a fooftiwfap#^ 
uct,.a northern telephone company, .a bank 
in Milwaukee, and a fried chicken chain 
gmongothers,' 

About the iconvention itself? 

As i-professioiiai, Chie|-Ponierance' is 
taking precautions' and'' has his- firigtos 
crossed, “tlie . voice Sfdissgnt usually is- di- 
rected at -the' party in powep,” he- says. 
“Thus, it was directed at - the Democrats, in 
Chicago in 1968. while ,we in Slianii -Beach 
had -a -relatively calm Republican conven-,- 
tiOn'.\ 

"Nowithat pkepublicah is- -the- incumbent 
■ of the White, -Hbuse,. 'San piego -(GOP com 
cention site) ^probabl y ot 

dissent.” ’ . • ' 










' — Text by LOUIS SALOME "" ' 

And WILLIAM TUCKER 
Photos by ED- MERVIS 
Graphics by BOB HAMILTON 

If velvet-gloved security can prevent it, Miami 
Beadi never will become another Chicago when the 
Democrats swarm here July 9-14 four years after 
their 1968 coriventioh-ordeal by riot. 

From the “city of broad shoulders,” .the conven- 
tion switches to the city of sun-tanned shoulders and . 
Police Chief Rocky Pomerance intends to preserve 
that image. 

Pomerance is overseeing the spending of 
$575,737- oh convention security, the great bulk of it 
on training and. coftimunications rather than arma- 
ment. 

And he is seeking to erect his security in “low 
profile” consistent with the brogd, open avenues 
around the Miami Beach Convention Hall complex, a • 
setting suggesting peace, not conflict. 

Like Chicago, Miami Beach has a Michigan. Ave- 
nue, That lakefront boulevard was the scene of some 
of the worst rioting at the Chicago convention. In 
contrast to the bristling police defenses thrown up by 
Chicago’s Mayor Richard Daley, hardly a billy, club 
will be seen on Miami Beach's Michigan Avenue or 
other streets near the Convention Hall. Not that the 
necessary men with weapons won’t be available on 
short notice. • 

Won’f reveal 
strategy 

“Police will be placed in places where we think 
tltey’ll be needed in as low a profile as possible,” 
Pomerance explains. “But I’m- just not going to reveal 
them and draw a map.” 

Much as this area needs the Democrats and the 
millions they will pump into the economy, nobody 
knows more, than Pbmerance that thi Beach, must- 
emerge from the speh^ng s|ree un|arnished.r"'’ ; ' 

It did so with thwRepubiica|*bO]®iswi£iO%fml9 , 
despite the 'Lihirty tfey rWti'.aeps^t|e;Bay,.: Bnly •- 
t-,vc 'arrested bn: the B8aCh.si^^“dur)ng 

the conventiWi^ The- Rev.' Ralph Abernainys mme . 
train” proceeded Without incident'.- . 

^ Other jocal police officials believe tliat trouble, 


if it comes during, the Democrats’ session, again will 
develop on the mainland side. But Miami and Dade 
County police also are undergoing more sophisticated 
training in the science of crowd psychology, partly 
under the convention security program.. - . 

Miaini and Metro police units will be officially 
attached to Pomerance’s mobile convention force. . ■ 

So will units of the Florida Highway Patrol. The 
Democratic Party itself will provide security inside 
the Convention Hall, employing a private guard firm. 

And the U.S, Secret Service will guard the vari- 
ous Democratic standard-bearer hopefuls. How many 
will he in the running at convention time is any- 
body’s guess but 14 are on the ballot for the March 
14 Florida preferential primary.- ... 

Pomerance’s security strategy falls into two 
phases, first preventive and, second, a.program of- acf 
tion when and if trouble starts. 

, The husky police-dR'ef hds one greatbuilt-in ally ! 
— the geography of Miami Beach. Any mass of uiru- ! 
ly humanity can be bottled’up by bridges across the 
bay, preventing import of reinforcement* or export 
of the trouble. . . ■ 

Seven different routes lead to Miami Beach but 
everyone is controlled by a bridge' or bridges. The 
bridges could be opened in ah emergency or, more 
simply, roadblocks could be set up that could only be 
•-circiim.vented by water. 

Six of the routes run across causeways from the 
mainland. The seventh. Highway AlA, from the 
north, has to cross Bakers Haulover cut via a Bascule 
bridge. * 

Isolation . ’ 

possible I 

' ‘ With all the drawbridges open, Miami Beach! 
would stand isolated like a castle behind a moat. I 

pomerance’s other plans, in the event of an! 
emer^ncy, are secret. But money for security isj 
I vbein^’s’^ent on a far greater scale than-in .19^8, when! 
. ..,anly S8i,0(H)'waa"feedTfbm ari’available.special’-^fuhd! 

" of $400,000. ' ‘V ■■ ; 

o,,-« 

The ■>»'>)« "of lulled hv the comnarativet 

peace of the 1968 meeting. For one thingr-jUbiesgoi 



happened after the GOP conventioaoif Se Beach. 

The biggest job this time, Poraerance said, is 
“preparing and educating the community and the 
country. 

As I see our role, it’s supportive and helpful 
rather than repressive,” he said. “I would like to 
present low-key, low-profile policing. 

“I think the key to this department’s attitude is 
the insignia on our police cars: 'We protect, we 
serve.’ Our theme is the effective and humane polic- 
ing of a political convention, 

“We must allow delegates to attain their objec- 
tives peacefully. Police will direct, guide and assist, 
not impede. 

“Our role also is, to protect demohstrators. We 
are very conscious of the First Amendment rights of 
demonstrators. And we must protect the communi- 
ty.” 

The last task includes maintaining an even flow 
of traffic in a city where traffic is never very simple. 
It also includes providing housing for the hundreds 
or perhaps thousands of people who will be drawn to 
the convention scene although they are not actually a 
part of it. 

If these people cannot find places to stay in 
Miami Beach, Pomerance fears, that ftfesue alone 
might produce a touchy confrontation. In that con- 
; nection, he is trying to involve Da de County agenc ies | 

such as the Greater Miami Coalition in obtaining i 
rooming houses or small hotels for such lodging. ! 

Large crowds 
may pour in 

. Persistent reports have seeped into the Miami 
area that a heavy influx of active young people in- 
cluding blacks, feminists, Chicanes (Mexican-Ameri- 
cans) and Cubans will come with the convention. 
Pomerance said his intelligence reports do not sup- 
port these predictions although the Democrats’ more 
open rules may bring more minority and militant 
group members to the convention than ever before. 

But in 1968, when Chicago had its trouble, the 
Democrats was the party in power and the natural 
target of protest. Poraerance pointed out. 

“Politically, the thrust is not against the Demo- 
crats, and many of the frustrations have been re- 
moved over the last three years,” Pomerance said. 
These pressures could he expected to shift to the Re- 
publicans, who meet in San Dieg? in August, he 
pointed out. 

All of Pomerance’s 240-man force and special 
units from other agencies start to school this month 
at a university that hasn’t even opened yet to the 
public — Florida International. 

Prof. Wayne Hanewicz of FIU is conducting the 
course which will include the background of political 
conventions, behavioral and sociological studies and 
the psychology of crowd control, 

. In the process, the Beach policemen and higher 
ranks from the Metro, Miami and Highway Patrol 
forces will earn between 9 0 and 100 hours of accred- 
ited college traiiimg. lo' prepare for this training. 


Psafi„.^lRpwicz and Pomerance wep t arou nd the ’ 
country researching police training curricula. ' j 

Funds iofal j 

broken down ’*• I 

Of the total $573,737 set up for convention secu- 
rity, the federal Law Enforcement Assistance Admin- 
istration provided '$395,424 and the City of Miami i 
roiice euucauun and uaiuing waa Baaigni-d . 
$119,328 and $228,406 w®® alloted for equipment. Of 
the latter, $178,486 was spent on communications. 
Only $4,585 of the remaining expenditures come 
under “armory and protective equipment.” 

t 

The communications setup is truly elaborate. It j 
includes a closed-circuit TV system, a radio scram- j 
bier, mobile command van, radio .paging system and I 
portable two-way radio packs. 

The small but select assortment of armor in-j 
eludes face shields for helmets, gas “hopper” gre- 
nades that can’t be picked up, and hurled back at po- 
lice, grenade launchers, gas dispensers and refills, 
gas and smoke generators, metal detection “friskers” 
and disposable plastic handcuffs. 

But again, Pomerance emphasizes that the key- 
note is prevention. 

“We feel that we will be able to cope with what- 
ever problems arise;” he said. “But by concentrating ! 
on the trouble aspect, it may easily become a self-ful- j 
filling prophecy. 

"It is my belief this convention will come and go- 
as all conventions here. We’ve had larger conven^i 
; tions. The difference with the political kind is thatl 
■ :hey are important to the public and the fact that the A 
•hews media focus heavily on the affair.” ‘ ' ? 





FEDERAL BUREAU OF I N VEST! G ATTI O N 
FOIPA 

BELETED PAGE INFORMATION SHEET 

No Busplicatian Fees are charged for Deleted Page Information Sheet(s^ 

Total Deleted Page<^s) ~ 6 
Page 103 ~ b6. b7C, b7D 
Page 1 04 ~b6, b7C, b7D 
Page 128 ~ b6. b7C, b7D 
Page 129 ~ b6. b7C, b7D 
Page 130 ~b6, b7C, h7D 
Page 233 ~ bb, b7C, b7D 



FBI File No. 80-MM-1353 

Democratic National Convention, Miami Beach, Florida, 

Summer 1972 

Section 2 



5 Ace- 

on 'vVirtr- 


Community Relations S 

(sT Eleventh- Street NW„ Washington. D.C. 20530. ’^t>hone; 202-739-4011) 

CREATION AND AUTHORITY. The 

Community Relations Service was^ 
created bv title X of the Civil Rights 
Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000g et seq.) . 

The Service is under the general au- 
thority of the Attorney General and is 
headed by a Director, who is appointed 
by the President with the advice and 

-uoytKlSMENT ORGANIZATION MANUAL 


consent of the Senate. The Service as- 
sists communides either on its own 
'initiative, at the request of State or 
local officials, or upon inquiry of other 
interested organizations or person. 

PURPOSE.— The Community Rela- 
tions Service not only aids in resolving 
disputes and difficulties as they erupt, 


REGIONAL OFFICES — COMMUNITY RELATIONS SERVICE 


Region 


Mld-.Vtlantic: District of Columbia, Delaware, Maryland, 
Pennsylvania, Virginia, We.st Virginia. 

Midwest; Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Miehlgan, 
Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio. Wisconsin. 

Northeast: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New 

Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, 
Vermont. 

Southeast; Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, 
Mississippi, North Carolina. South Carolina. Tennessee. 

Southwest: Arkansas, Colorado, Louisiana, Montana. New 
Jlexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, 
Utah, Wyoming. 

Western; Alaska, .\rizona. California, Hawaii, Idaho, 
Nevada, Oregon, Washington. 


Regional Directors 


(Vacancy)- 

Richard Salem 

Edward O’Connell 

Robert Alexander, 
Acting. 

Lorenzo Ramirez... 
Edward Howden.. 


Address 


1421 Cherry St., 
Phlladelpliia, Pa. 
10102. 

220 S. State St., 
Chicago, 111. 60604. 

26 Federal Plaza, 

New York. N.Y. 
10007. 

75 Piedmont Ave. NE., 
Atlanta, Ga. 30303. 
1100 Commerce St., 
Dallas, Tex. 75202. 

450 Golden Gate Ave., 
San Francisco. Calif. 
94102. 


FIELD OFFICES COM.MUNITY RELATIONS SERVICE 



City 

Address 


Address 


Albuquerque, N.Mex. 87101.. 

500 Gold Ave., SW. 

Los Anpelcs, Calif. 90012 

312 N. Spring St. 

♦ 

Baltimore, Md. 21201 

31 Hopkins Plaz.a. 

Louisville, Kv. 40202 

600 Federal Place. 

« 

Boston, Mass. 02203 

John F. Kennedy 

Milwaukee, Wis. 53202 

517 E. Wisconsin Ave. 


Buffalo, N.Y. 14202 

Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 

Cleveland, Ohio 44109-- 

Denver, Colo. 80202 

Federal Office Bldg. 
OS Court St. 

550 Main St. 

1240 E. 9tli St. 

1823 Stout St. 

Newark, N*.!. 07102 

New Orleans, La. 70U3 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 73102.. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 15219 

970 Broad St. 

701 Loyola. 

215 MW. 3rd St. 

519 U.S. Post Office 
and Courthouse. 


Detroit, Mich. 4S226 

Gary, Ind. 46102 

231 W. Lafayette Blvd. 
504 Broadway. 

450 Main St. 

St. Louis, Mo. 63101 

San Antonio, Tex. 7S205 

210 N. 12th Blvd. 
106 Broadway. 
770 B St. 

1 


515 Rusk St. 


T7.S. Courthouse. 


Kansas City, Mo. G4106._ 

Little Rock, Ark. 72201 

811 Grand Ave. 
700 W. Capitol. 

Washington, D.C. 20530 

Wilmington, Del. 19804 

521 12th St. NW. 
901 Market St. 



but also helps communities to achieve 
the kind of progress which will enable 
them to avoid racial upheavals. Its goal 
is tp help bring about rapid and orderly 
progress toward securing a life of jus- 
tice, equal opportunity, and human 
dignity for all American citizens. 

ORGANiz.ATioN. — The Service is or- 
ganized into three main divisions to 
accomplish its mission-: 

Division of National Services super- 
vises all national program activities and 
projects that extend beyond individual 
regional boundaries. The Division ini- 
tially is comprised of two sections : Pri- 
vate Organizations Liaison and Special 
Projects. 

Division of Field Services maintains 
• regional and field offices which provide 
immediate assistance to local com- 
munities through activities designed 


to eliminate facial disparities and 
injustices. 

Division of Support Services pro- 
vides technical services and assistance 
to the field representatives and to 
indigenous groups, news media repre- 
sentatives, and public and private offi- 
cials on projects and programs 
dealing with community and economic 
development, housing, education, 
police-minority relations, and com- 
munications between groups. 

ACTIVITIES. — ^Among the activities of 
the Service are: helping communities 
to identify their social problems that 
are more apparent from an objective, 
outside perspective; aiding communi- 
ties in developing and applying their 
resources for rapid, orderly social and 
economic change in minority com- 
munities; helping to speed delivery to 
communities of Federal programs and 






department of justice 


.197 


■ sendees designed to improve social and 
economic conditions; assisting minor- 
ity communities to estab ish and 
strengthen constructive seh-help and 
self-determination projects and pro- 
mrams; encouraging the involvement 
i jn thft decision-msking 

processes of their communities; and 
promoting impartial law enforcement 


locally and encom-aging compliance 
with Federal latvs at all levels. 


202 — 739 - 4006 . _____ 



- i 

1. X 

I 

i 

! 

I 

\ 


1 

% 

I 


T 








■ 1 


f 







COMMXJNITY RELATIONS SERVICE 
650 Jlth Street, Todd Building. Phone, 739-4024 

^rUrcSor . — Ben Holman, 29'2'2 W Street SB. 20020. in i ATfl 

D/rcdor.-Donald W. Jones, 6107 Reed Street, J4ortli Englewood, Md. 
20785. 

Assodale Director for National Semces.— Gilbert G. Pompa, 10500 Elmira C- - 
Fairfax Va. 22203. 

Assistant Director for Field Services— Harry T. Martin, 2301 Connecticut .V.\- .. 

Apt. 33 2000S. • ■ ' ; „ . 

Assistant Director for Support Services. — Edward A. Kirk, 4701' Olley L ^ 
Bin-ke. Va. 22015. , 1 

Chief Counsel. — Lawrence S. Hoffheimer, 556 Bruton Court, McLe.a_n, 1 a. 22i- 
Administrative Officer. — Richard II. Adams, 1358 Fourth Street SM . 20024. 
Program Development Oflicer.— Julian Klugman, 10586 Twin Rivers i: 

Puilic Information Officer. — Harvey L. Brinson, 3o27 12th Street &E. 200^2. 

REGIONAL OFFICES 

Regional Directors; ' „ . , , ^ - s on-^ r> r m 

Southeast Region.— Robert R. Alcsander (acting), 200 Peyton Place c . 

Apt. D-10, Atlanta, Ga. 30311. 

Midwest Region.— Richard A. Salem, 1225 Oak Avenue, Chicago, 111. oOr. . 
Northeast Region. — Edward H. O'Connell) Jr., 227 Central Pars \ 

Apt. 6D, New York, N.Y. 10024. ■ 

Western Region.— Edward W. Howden, 191 Upper Terrace, San Franc. ■ 

Calif. 94117. . ^ . r. , , - 

Southwest' Region. — Lorenzo Ramirez, 3817 Uouglas Drive, Garland, 

■75040. ^ 



Pel?niar7 25 » 197^ 


Gird, of liocl'ij Pcijerauco 
iiiaiii Beach Police Dopartnent 
ICO heridian Avenue 
iliaci Beach, Florida 55159 

Dear Chief Ponorancej 

Ae reauoated at the ccuvention planning neoting that 
wae held on Pehruary 17 , 1972, thic is to notify you 
that the Intelligence liaiaon of fig or fer the Biaai 
Police Departnont vjill bo Lajor l \ 

Oonuandcr of the Special InvoGtigation accuion, 

Loat eiiiCux'ul^^ 


E^rnQrd>fcHr-i»8ffniro 

Chief of Police 


f Xi'jT i aBe s j D 


I C 5 — J Supervisor 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 

Central Eecords 
Homicide Detail 


5 * 

(k^ 










Conv-ention File 


DATE: Febru^y 7, 1972 


FROM: Captain! 


SUBJECT: COMMUNITY RELATIONS SERVICE 


On February 3, 1972 a meeting was conducted in Chief Pomerance's 
office with representatives of the Community Relations Service 

of the Department of Justice. Washing ton. D| — C Ln_ attendance 

were Chief Pomerance, Colonel — I Major! [and Captain 

•Hri g Oona rtmpnt and! | and | | 

Of CRS. 

Chi-ef Pomerance assured the CRS members that he welcomed any 
assistance they might offer. They advise.d that their information 
indicated little need for their servi ces/here including the time 
during tie People's P.arty Convention in tihat they had coniversed 
with key'people involved with the Party planning. 

stated that their group is proficient in two categories: 

(1) Long-run crisis prevention, and 

(2) Crisis resolution. 

They claimed to have considerable experience in working with blacks, 
Puerto Ricans and Chicanos. However, upon Chief Pomerance's inquiry, 
admitted little or no experience with the Cuban polulace. 

Itheorises that they might be able to assist with the 
media and via "pipelines" to minority groups. Chief Pomerance again 
encouraged their participation. We discussed the need for a rumor 
control center and that "Switchboard" intended to serve in this 
capacity. ! ! advised that their organization includes numerous 

competent field representatives that could ^be of assistance and, 
inasmuch as we had requested aid, he wnuTd' assign some of them in 

this area, including a media specialist. ! who works out 

of Washingt'on, D. C., stated that he would' be in a position to 
communicate with all groups on the national level and keep us advised. 

We discussed the pptential of seeking rumor control aid by way of 
PTA groups and of programs for training marshalls (from past experience 
there is usually one marshall fOr* every 20 participants. Potential 
trouble-makers frequently qualify as excellen t marshalls.) 


can be con' 
Washi nntnn 
phone^ 


)y phone! !or in 

can be contacted in Washlngtoj 


/3r3-y^ 


SEARCHEfi;.,,,,,... INDEXED., 
S^!?(A£I2£D „#ILED„.,.^ 


Me 


itainf 






FD-3S0 (Rev. 7-16-63) 


(Mount Clipping in Space Below) 


(Indicate page, name of 
newspaper, city and state.) 


|Yippies pianping 
nonviolence here 


JerrjrRuTjin, leader of the 
Youth- , International , Party - 
an^'.a co-defendant .in the 
“Chicago' 8” conspiracy trial, 
announped in. Miami Beach . 
today that his organizatioh 
plans to. sponsor honvioient 
demonstrations, here, during, 
the ibenlocratio National 
convention this.summer. 

Speaking to reporters out- 
side the Miami j^each- Con-!- 
vention Hall,' Rubin, said his 
groupj the Yippies, intends to 
invite young people from .all 
over the -country teioin them • 
, at the Bea'Ch, during the con- 
i ventiop July 9-14. 

' Rubin would not speculate . 

i m exactly what soft of actiy- 
j ties the Yippies Would, hold' 

\ it the Beach duringi the con- 


vention,. saying that his 
. group has not yet discussed . 
detailed-pians. . 

But he . said the Yippies. in- 
tend tofractice non-violence , 
in any '.protest they might 
stage, and are hoping ,to 
avoid any 'unnecessary- ''coa- 
frontations with police. 

. Rubin was one of the keyi 
organizers of the denionsha- 
tions .that rocked tlje 19^8 
DeniocratieNational Cbftven- 
tiofe in'ChKagoi He.lgter Was 
indicted in federal court for 
allegediy crossing state fines 
with intent to incite a sriotM 
Chicago. . t 

Rubin said today the Yiti ■ 

. pies do not plan. to stcge : 

" repeat;Of the Chicago'demoij ■, 
strationshere. 


16-A 


MIAMI NEWS 


MIAMI, FLORIDA 


Date: 2/16/72 


DEM0i®lcW}f0NAL 

CONVENTION 


Classification : 80-1353 
Submitting Office: MIAMI, FLA, 

I I Beinq Investigated 








BJRECrOE, FBI <62-112678) 


2/24/72 


SAC, MIAMI (100-16553) (P) 


WHITS PANTHSR PAKTY WPP) 

IS - WEP 

<00:Detroit) 

He Alexandria letter to Director, 11/18/71. 

The referenced coaatunlcation, on imges 6 and 7, 
discloses that the WPP has as their next sajor “target” 
the 1972 Democratic Convention, where the WPP will he 
seen la “full force”, 

LEAD 

DETROIT 

AT ARH ARBOR, MICHIGAM 

Will contact other hnowledgable sources:; for 
confirraation of this allegation, and submit in form suitable 
for dissemination. Will thereafter follow closolY and heep 
Bureau and Miami informed of SPP contemplated actions with 
respect M Rational Democratic Convention, up to and in- 
cluding dates of convention. 


2 - Bureau <RM) 

2 - Detroit <100-36217) (mi) 

80-1353) (DEMCOIO 
jrjM/alsdk 
( 6 ) 


UMniitJ-f- 






W-/353'7'</ 


Convention Fi 


FROM: Captain 


DATE: Febr^ry 21, 1972 


SUBJECT: TRA 

and 



On February 17, 1 972 at 4 P.M.,| ^ 

New Projects for Technical Research & Innovation C orPt (TRAIN ], 

Atlanta based company with an office in Miami, and| ^ |a 

local representative and member of SC LC visited t he Convention Office 
and conferred with the writer, Captain 

indicated that his firm would like to participate in our 

Convention Planning either in the training program or as liaison between 
potential demonstrators and the police. He claimed to have had 
considerable experience as a liaison with Chief Wilson at the May Day 
demonstrati o ns in Washington, D. C. and other similar activities. 

made inquiries ref erence pOUi: involvement wi th_ communi ty 

relations and mentioned that Captain] jof the.Miami Police Depart- 

ment had informed him that the Miami Department intended to assign 
12 personnel to the community relations field pe.rtaining to convention 
planning. 


According to 
clients: ' 


TRAIN provides the following services to its 


(1) Identifies and assesses problems of a community, 
group or agency; 

(2) Determines the most effective means of alleviating the 
problem and develops a program for the resolution of 
the problem; 

(3) . Furnishes training and technical assistance for implementing 

the program by developing the skills of persons to be 
involved in the implementation of sucha program. 

I advised] ] that our grant money had previously been committed 

(he advocates ammendi ng the grant) and that our trai ning program was 
being funneled through the Florida International University. (He claims 
a passing acquaintance with] 

Prior to his departing, (haying awakened vtho had 

been sleeping soundly in a cnair since her- arrival) presented me a 
copy of his personal qualifications statement and a profile of the 
Technical Research & Innovation Corp., P. 0. Box 77124, Atlanta, Georgia 
30309 phone U04) 874-3678'. 

NOTE* ] ^ ] had previously 

Teft’word with ] I that he was staying at the Miramor Motel (?) 

Roo m 424‘ and left a nhone number 633-7-^636. He also mentioned that he 
was 




BDKieji 

cc: Convention Staff 


j\Vt* V 

Captai rp 






2/24/72 


AIRT3SL 


TO; SAC^ ATLANTA 

FROM; SAC, MIASII (80-1353) 

SUBJECT: MIDEM 


On 2/24/72, Capt. 


a 


(NA), Miami 


Beach PD, Associate Director of the Democratic National 
Convention^ furnished the enclosed memorandum which is 
self-explanatory. 




comments of SA 


Atlanta is requested to furnish/ any available 
^ceroifl 




2 - Atlanta ^Enc. X) (mi) 
lliami (X - 80-1353) 

^ (1 - 100- ) (SCLC) 

JCB/rec 
(4) 





be 

b7< 

b7: 



By ROBE RT STULB ERG 
Miami 'Hews' Repofter 

A. spokesman for a new co- 
alition of activist groups in 
Florida. announced today that 
his organization will sponsor 
two days of nonviolent .pro- 
tests in Miami geach during- 
the July Democratic National 
Confetitiott. 

The announcement was 
raadehere by Jack Lament, a 
leading member of the new 
group, the Florida People’s 
Platform Codition. 

In aii interview -with The- 
.NewSj Lamont, news.directpr 
of radio station I^US-FM 
in 'Miami Beachj said that the 
new coalition will meet up? 
state this- weekend to begin 
planning the protests, whiclt. 
y ill be held outside thj 
ly iaml: Beach Coilventior i 
I dr bn twa- successfye day ; 
tpesefebnd'week.in.Juiy. f 

Lamont said that the neW 
coalition of liberal and radi- 
cal activists from, across the 
state plans to invite people - 
from across the -country to 
attend the demonstrations. 

He said that the group is 
hoping the two days Of pro^ 
test this summer will bg or- 
derly and nonviolent. 

“The demonstrations will 
consist of a peaceful legal 
rally and march sequence 
lasting - no more than two 
days,” LaMont said. “The 
events will surround the date 
that the presidential candi- 
date is nominated.” 

“The primary focus of the 
strategy is to move the issue 
of the war and the need for 
immediate total withdraw! il. 
Kfrom Vietnam) hack Into tile 
campaign.” i 

. Lamont said several do- 
mestic issues will also be 
stressed during the protests. I 

Until .now,- only two na-l 
tjonal organizations thd 


hippies |he g iopies ^ 
have announced plans to.p’"'- 
test at the cottyentioni and 
New Left sources have Sa.a 
neither group has the follow- 
ing necessary to dra-W large 
mumbers. 

, Larnont said ha is confi- 
dent that his organization 
will be able to draw signifi- 
cant numbets of demonstra-- 
tors to the convention -^| 
though he declined' to- esti-| 
■mate how many.. 

-He said the new coalition 
has-been in touch with sever- 
al large national protest 
groups, in the North, and 
there is a good chance that 
the, organizations, including 
the Vietmaim Veterans 
Against the' 'Wa.f, in Wash-: 
ington,, jJiC., will help orga-] 
nize the Beach protests. 

In the condng monthSj, La- 
ihont said; -his gtoupi, which- 
he -described as “ariti-sekist, 
anti-racist and ahti-ithperiai-! 
isti’* plans' to mountan inten- 
s i v e publicity campaign 
throughout the country to at- 
tract demonstrators — espe« 
dally those living ott tl|e 
Fist Coast tor Miam 
I each- this summer. ^ | 

I ; Lamont said the publicity 
, campaign ' will be similar in 
scope to the one being orga- 
nized by a West Coast coalk 
tion making plansTor demon- 
strations at the Republican 
: National Convehtibn; in San 
Diego in August IBut he said 
that he does not expect as 
many demonstrators, to come 
here as are expected in San 


Qbservea fr-on . . t he, ' West 
Coast have predicted in re- 
cent’.weeks that at least 50,0;- 
000.- people will travel to San - 
Diego to stage nonviolent 
pfotests-there in August. 

' In Miami, police and liBef- 
al otgapizefs -have predicted, 
.that least 10,000 pfotes- 
t|fs and other non-deiegatess 
will be at the cqnventiom 
|ome:estimates 'have rahgeffl 
,ls’hlgh as:5d;000. to I06,000i I 


(Indicate page, name of 
newspaper, city and state.) 


MIAMI NEWS' 


MIAMI, FLORIDA 


Date: 2/23/72 



I Edition: 


Title: DEMOCRATIC 

NATIONAL CONVENTION 

Character: 

' or 

^t;iasslflcation: 80-1353 
Submitting Office: MIAMI, FLA. 

I I Being Investigated 






DECLASSIFICATIOH AUTHORITY DERIVED FP.OH; 
FBI AUTOKATIC DECLASSIFICATION GUIDE 


FD-342 (Rev. 1-26-65) D*“|^^pZ-09“Z01Z 

* * United States ^^artment of Justice 

' Federal Bureau of Investigation 




Miami y Florida 
February 20, 1072 


U. S* Secret Service, Miami 


Re ; DEMOCRATIC C02JVEHTI0N 


Dear Sir: 

For your information, I am enclosing communications 
which may be of interest to you. 

Very truly yours, 


ERRNSTH W. WHITTAKER 

Special Agent in Charge 


Enc. 


3y- 80-1353 
1 - 66-2586 
JCB/dk 



XAD 


(Upon removal of classified enclosures, if any, this transmittal form becomes 
UNCLASSIFIED.) 





' DICLASSIFICATIOII AUTHORITY DERIVED FROM: 

)ENTIAL FBI AU^fcTIC DECLASSIFICATIGH GUIDE 


# C0N!KJ)ENTIAL FBI AT^|lTIC Di 
, ^p^ -zoiz 

TJNITMD STATES DEPAUTMENT OF JUSTICE 


In Ucply, Please Hefcr to 

File No. mm 176-3 


KKOKKAL HUUHAU OK I N V KSTfG ATION 


Miami, Florida . 
February 23, 1972 


CONI 


Re: JERRY CLYDE RUBIN 


jerry CLYDE RUBIN , on February 18 
/ /• ? J 1970, -was found guxlty of Antx-Riot 

violations that arose from 
activities during the Democratic 
National Convention, Chicago, 

Illinois, August, 1968. Pending 
an appeal, he was released on bond 
• by the U.S. Court 

4-10, 1972 _ 

JERRY RUBIN, under the auspices of the Student 
Program Council (SPC) , University of Miami (UM), Coral 
Gables, Florida, was booked as a guest speaker for the 
evening of February 14, 1972 at that institution. The 
honorium, that included expenses, was to be $650. 


The SPC first negotiated with| Jfor hxs 

appearance. A misunderstanding of the fe e tO be paid 
resulted in the substitution of RUBIN for 

when advised, indicated he still wanted^ 
to appear at the UM . He advised he had cleared this with 
■TPi RPV RTmTW- I Is a id he would be at the UM to speak 

ont father than the date originally set. 


be paid 


gStiJ C?JSVi8VHGri®-*<-;>lC3uu 








'/3S'3- 



Re: JERRY CLYDE RUBIN 


Fe bruary 11, 1972 




JERRY RUBIN; on February 11, 1972 was contacted 

in New York, He was informed as to what | [had said. 

JERRY RUBIN became agitated. He remarkea| [had not 

cleared the matter of speaking at the UM with him. ^ 


Late that same evening RUBIN arrived in Mi^i 
on a flight from New York. He contacte d local activp ts 
for accommodation^^ He was referred to I I who 




MM T-1 



STEWART ALBERT is a long-time 
activist and associate of 
JERRY RUBIN. 


JERRY RUBIN, on spent the 

earlier part of the day at the beach. Later he entered 
a local department store where a temporary voter registration 
booth v/as located. RUBIN registered to vote in the Florida 
primaries. In the evening he was at the UM where he 
finali zed plans to ap pear as a guest speaker on February 14, 
1972. did not appear as scheduled on 

I [Tt the UM. 



MM T-2 





r 




The February 13, 1972 issue of "The Miami Herald" 
contained an article entitled "Registrars Swamped on 
Final Day — Jerry Rubin Pops Up as Republican" . This 
article concerned the newly qualified to vote as the 
result of a decision by a panel of Federal judges in 
Orlando, Florida, who "threw out the state’s residency 
requirements for voters". ! 

According to the article, WILLARD MILLER, Acting 
Supervisor of Elections, disapproved of the Federal court 
decision predicting it could lead to widespread voter 
fraud. 

The article continued by stating Chicago 7 
defendant JERRY RUBIN, who arrived in town late Saturday, 
popped into a department store and added his name to the 
books registering as a Republican. According to the 
article, the radical activist RUBIN said he wanted to 
"mystify and disorient the party system and... to vote 
against NIXON". 

February 14, 1972 i 

JERRY RUBIN reportedly was under the influence 
of a narcotic described as MDA. He was attempting to ward 
off its effects in order that he might be able to appear 
at the UM that evening as scheduled. 

I 

, MM T-1 — , b7D I 


February 14, 1972 Continued 

JERRY RUBIN spoke at the UM on the evening of 
Febi'uary 14, 1972. Approximately 400 were in attendance. 

He ccmimenced at 8:30 P.M. and spoke for an hour. No 
incidents occurred. 

RUBIN, in his remarks, lacked a continuity. He 
stated he had something the day before (inferring narcotics) 
and did not know what was going on or what day it was. He 
forgot his subject matter. His talk was geared to be 


con; 


lAL 



3ENTIAL 


Re: JERRY CLYDE RUBIN 


humorous , He mentioned the forthcoming Democratic National 
Convention afad stated the UM students, who are in Miami, 
should lead the way. They should build an organization in 


Miaiiii that would facilitate helping of outsxde agitators 
doming to Miami. The UM students know the streets where 
actions could take place. Agitators, thus organized, could 
then go frcMn Miami to San Diego. ^ 


RUBIN mentioned he registered to vote as a 
Republican but that he supported presidential candidate 
SHIRLEY CHISHOLM. 

He mentioned presidential candidate GEORGE 
MC GOVERN, who is concerned it appears with the blacks and 
the poor and that if he is so interested, he ought to be 
pushing SHIRLEY CHISHOLM, He stated MC GOVERN was chauvinistic 
and recently presented his wife as his valentine. MC GOVERN 
takes a position on marijuana that penalties should be 
reduced for users but increased heavily for pushers and 
dealers. If that is the case, who is going to deal, and so 
this is an example of MC GOVERN ’s double standard. 




February 14, 1972 Continued 


After speaking at the UM, RUBIN met with a small 
group in the Coconut Grove area of Miami to discuss the 
forthcoming political conventions. 

MM T-1 


February l5 , 1972 

r -I -11 -r -I I r.— 1— T -.iTTT — . r ■, m V 

JERRY RUBIN was a guest on a talk show broadcast 
by radio station TOUS-FM , Miami Beach, Florida on the late 
evening of February 15, 1972. On the program he announced 
he would hold a news conference the following day in front 


CONF] 


^TIAL 



confMntial 


Re: JERRY CLYDE RUBIN / \ 

of the Miami Beach Convention Hall, the site of the 
forthcoming Democratic National Convention. RUBIN answered 
questions phoned in by the listening audience, but was 
interrupted when a bomb threat was received at the radio 
station. 

MM T-1 
2/21/72 

JERRY RUBIN and STU ALBERT were guests on a 
talk show broadcast over radio station WBUS on the late 
evening of February 15, 1972. The program consisted of 
music with a counter-culture theme. 

RUBIN indicated he and ALBERT had recently been 
in Chile which he described as having more political 
freedom than the United States. 

Both fielded a number of questions from the 
listening audience. In response to one, RUBIN consented that 
every FBI Agent is a potential defector from the FBI; that 
the FBI should be abolished. 

He stated that today he probably would not 
perfosrm some of his more bizarre acts as he had in the past, 
such as appearing on a television show in judicial robes, 
thsn doffing the robes and trampling on them. He remarked 
that political protest by the youth culture is currently 
muted but far from dead. 

At several points in the program he expressed 
contempt for the Democratic presidential candidates with 
the exception of SHIRLEY CHISHOLM, 

When a caller requested support of RUBIN for 
*’Operation*Snowplow" he stated he had no knowledge of the 
project. When it was explained to him that it was a 
nonpartisan effort to feed, house and transport 
youthful demonstrators who may come to the Nationa l 
Democratic Convention, he said that he would support the 
concepT ^ Shortly after midnight while still on the air, 
a bomb threat was received at the radio station. 

Special Agent, FBI 
2/16/72 


- 5 - 

co nf)^ ntial 



1 


JERRY CLYDE RUBIN 

"Operation" “Snowplow*’ is a non-political 
coalition of Miami organizations whose 
purpose is to provide food, shelter and 
medical service to non-delegate youth 
groups who may come to Miami for the 
Democratic National Convention. 



February 16, 1972 

JERRY RUBIN held a press conference on February 16 , b 7 D 
1972 in front of the Miami Beach Convention Hall, the site 
of the forthcoming Democratic National Convention. Because 
of the bomb threat received during his broadcast the previous 
night, RUBIN was apprehensive that unfriendly elements 
might disrupt the press conference . He requested a local 
activist to be present and to serve as his bodyguard. ^ 



RUBIN during the press conference, stated he and 
STU AT.BERT"^ew people in Miami who have planned demonstrat i ons 
during the Democratic National Convention in July, 1972. 

He remarked all probably remember what happened four years 


in the streets defeated the Democratic Party and that Yippies 
frcrni all over the country will be ccmiing to Miami. 

There will be 10,000 Yippies marching naked in 
front of the convention hall .... there is going to be 
mari.juana smoked everywhere . . . .we will not tolerate 
the nomination of HUMPHREY. MUSKIE. JACKSON or WALLACE. 

RUBIN said he hopes its peaceful. There will 
be no poinT~f or violence. He heard the police are taking" 
sensitivity training classes and that is good. It was 
the police who made it violent in Chicago. If there is 
any violence, it will cost the Democrats the election. 

RUBIN said they are coming in nvunbers to make their presence 

- 6 - 




;r; /< ? ., ■ :i " J 



CONFKJENTIAL 


Re: JERRY CLYDE RUBIN 


felt and express themselves and if the police atta ck or 

do not give a permit, then all the bombs are their 
responsibility. 

From Miami we*re going to march to San Diego .... 
there will be a million people in San Diego v/ho will 
surround the Republican National Convention and make it 
totally impossible for RICHARD M, NIXON to be re-elected. 

RUBIN .stated that every kid is going to want 
to spend their summer in Miami and San Diego and though 
campuses are quiet all kinds of high school kids and college 
kids will come to those cities .... Miami will probably 
have the biggest demonstrations it has ever had .... we’re 
on a speaking tour throughout Florida .... we will stay 
here to work with local people in making it happen. 

RUBIN was asked concerning Chief of Polic e 
(Miami Beach) POMERANCE's statement that the mi-n'ute they’. 


by saying the moment he breaks the law we’^. 


jail. He’ll be the lawbreaker not us . . . . ne’ii nave 


the heaviest artillery but we’ll have moral, spirxtual 


power on our side. 

RUBIN stated they were planning a non-violent 
celebration . . . . the' Democrats paid a big price in 
1968 .... the 
they do not want violence .... they can avoid this by 
giving us march permits and a place to assembleT" 

RUBIN stated there will be enough food for everyone , 
housing and dope .... we hope the person the Democrats 
nominate for president comes out on to this lawn and gets 
stoned with us ... . everyone smokes dope now . . the 


e canaxaates 


smoke dope. Check out the odor in the smoke-filled rooms. 



RUBIN remarked that his base of operations will 


be Miami Beach, Florida, but admitted he does not have an 


office as yet. 

- 7 - 


CONFIDENTIAL 











RUBIN stated that SHIRLEY CHISHOLM was a most 
acceptable political candidate for the presidency L She 
represents black people, women, poor people, ghetto 
people and people on the bottom. She has no chance because 
she is not acceptable to the middle-aged male politicians 
that are going to dcmiinate the convention and produce 
probably MUSKIE who is just another version of RICHARD 
NIXON. 


RUBIN stated that the Brooklyn Liberation Front 
will be down .... people from Brooklyn usually create 
a stir .... they're not quiet and soft-spoken .... 
so we imagine Miami is going to look a little like Brooklyn. 

RUBIN again remarked he expected 20,000 to march 
naked and he has a commitment from JOHN LINDSAY and HUBERT 
HUlilPHREY to join the march. 

When asked if he would wear a NIXON button, 

RUBIN responded by saying RICHARD NIXON is helping the cause 
of communism by going to China . . . . he is helping Chinese 
influence throughout the world .... he is influencing 
communism throughout America. He has been anti-communist 
all his life, but just to get re-elected he will do 
anything . . . . he’ll go to China to sell the whole country 
to communism .... RUBIN stated he would put on a NIXON 
button because NIXON is a secret member of the Communist 
Party and in China he is going to say that he has been a 
Marxis t-Leninist all his life. 

When questioned concerning Chief of Police POMERANCE’s 
statement €Eat they v;ould go to jail if they break the law, 
RUBIN responded by stating Mayor DALEY ^Chicago, Illinois) 
said that and was very foolish .... POMERANCE does not 
v/ant to be another Mayor DALEY . . . . 

STU ALBERT then spoke and stated that the Democrats 
are different from the Republicans, but they will have to 

- 8 - 


conMential 




prove it ... . the only way they can do that is by 
setting a date .... NIXON has not set a date and that 
is why the war is continuing .... we’re going to demand 
that the Democrats set a date .... that their candidate 
for the presidency sets a date and lets the American 
people know what that date is before the election. 

ALBERT remarked they’re going to bring as many 
peopTe as they can to Miami to force thd Democratic Party 
and their candidate to set the date. 

T-4 _ 


February 19, 1972 

The February 20, 1972 issue of "The Miami Herald" 
contained an article entitled "Sunshine Special Streaks 
Into Miami". This article concerned a Campaign train of 
Senator EDMUND MUSKIE that traveled from Jacksonville to 
Miami with the senator aboard. 

The article stated that JERRY RUBIN had boarded 
the train in West Palm Beach with press credentials apparently 
obtained from a Rolling Stone’s Washington correspondent. 
Yippie activist JERRY RUBIN interrupted the senator 
repeatedly and heckled his remarks at the various whistle 
stops. MUSKIE ultimately wound up scolding RUBIN and cut 
short his remarks after snapping at RUBIN, "You don’t want 
to hear what I think; you don’t want to dialogue. You’re 
just here to disrupt the meeting". 

February 20, 1972 


JERRY RUBIN had scheduled a meeting of the Miami 
Liberation Front to take place February 23, 1972 at the UM 
to discuss plans for the forthcoming Democratic National 
Convention. RUBIN was advised that he was premature and 
the meeting was cancelled. He remarked "I don’t understand". 

MM T-1 



b7D 








RUBIN reportedly departed Miami destined for New 
York, New York and was expected to watch the telecast of 
the "Mike Douglas ;Sh6w" that was broadcast on February 22, 

1972. RUBIN appeared in the program Which had been taped 
some weeks earlier. 

b7D 

MM T-1 


This docviment contains neither recommendations 
nor conclusions of the FBI. It is the property of the 
FBI and is loaned to your agency; it and its contents 
are not to be distributed outside your agency. 



-r-.'.-.w v-*' 







In Reply, Please Rejer to 
rUeNo. 176-3 


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 

Miami , Florida 
February 23, 19^2 


Title 


JERRY CLYDE RUBIN 


Character 

Reference letterhead memorandum dated 

and captioned as above , at 
Miami, Florida. 


All sources .(except any listed belov) whose identities 
are concealed in referenced communication have furnished reliable 
information in the past. 


contains neither recommendations nor conclusions of the FBI. It Is the propert 
ot the FBI and Is loaned to your agency; It and Its contents are not to be distributed outside 
your agency. 













MM 176-3 


Enclosed for the Bureau are 12 copies of an LHM 
entitled ’’JERRY CLYDE RUBIN” dated 2/23/72. Copies are 
being furnished Chicago, New York, Washington Field, 
Minneapolis and Sail Diego origin in laaiters iaeniioneJ therein. 
Information copies are being furnished Jacksonville and 
Taiapa. 


A copy of the LHM is being furnished to U.S. 
Secret Service, Miami. 


SOURCES 


SA 

SA 


MM T-1 -is 



* 


MM T-2 is 


to SA 


MM T-3 is 


Who furnished information to 
who furnished information to 
who furnished information 


■b6 

to7C 

b7D 


MM T-4 is a well-placed source. 


Information contained in the LHM is considered 
the original recording. 

CLASSIFICATION 

The LHM has been classified C o nfidential in order 
to protect MM T-1, MM T-2 and MM T-3, who are sources of 
continuing value and whose identities, if disclosed, could 
detrimentally effect the national defense interests of the 
United States, 


ADMINISTRATIVE 


b6 

b7C 

b7E 


For the information of the Bureau, New York, 
Chicago and Minneapolis , the 2/17/72 issue #102 of the 
’’Rolling Stone” distributed nationally, documents the 
association of JERRY RUBIN and JOHN SINCLAIR with JOHN and 
YOKO LENNON, Miami, under separate cover, will forward a 
copy to the Bureau. 


2 




MM 176-3 


The press conference was recorded by the Miami 
Beach Police Department and is maintained in Miami file 
176-3 Sub Al. 

LEAD 


CHICAGO 


AT CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

Will determine if RUBIN 's registration to vote 
in the Florida primaries is in violation of the conditions 
under which he was released on bond. 

NEW YORK 


AT BROOKLYN. NEW YORK 

Ascertain plans of Brooklyn Liberation Front" 
with respect to National Democratic Convention at Miami. 
Advise Miami. 


3 






V 




TELETYPE 


2/25/72 

CODE 

URGENT 


TO DIRECTOR 
TAMPA 

FRC»1 MIAMI ( -SEW) 


FLORIDA PEOPLES PL'VTFORM COALITION (PPPC) . INTERNAL SECORITy - 
NEW LEFT, VIDm, 


ms TO 


BE PRESENT. 


HOWEVER, 


IS UNABLE TO ATTEND 


AND WILL SEND IN HIS PLACE ONE 

THE FEBRUARy Tt^ENTyTHREE SBVENTyTWO ISSUE OF THE 
"MIAMI NEWS" STATES THE PPPC, AOCORDH^G TO UACK LAMONT (NEWS 


X - -New 
(X' - 80-1353 (DEMCON) 
1 - 105-9843 (VIDm) 
JUMssl 
(3) 




PAGE TWO 

D1REC20R OP RADIO STATION WBUS-PM, MIAMI BEACH) , DESCRIBED 
AS A DBADING MEMBER OP THE NEW GROUP r WlMi SSONSOR TWO DATS 
OP NON-VIOIiEHT PROTESTS IN MIAMI BEACH DURIilG THE JULT 
DEMOCRATIC J^TlOKSIt COEWENTION, IiAMOHT ®E(3 THE PRIMAHST FOCUS 
OP THIS STRATHS IS TO MOPE THE I^HE OP THE WAR AND THE NEED 
FOR 1»TAI» WITHDRA1®!* PROM VIETNAM BACK INTO THE CAMPAIGN. 
DMIOHT DESCRIBED 1HB PPPC AS ”ANTI-SSSCIST, ANTI-RACIST* 

AND AOTI-IMPERIAIiIST#’* 


THE TA24PA OFFICE IS REQUESTED 1X> ADVISE MIAMI OP PPPC 
PIANS POR THE DE140CKITIC CONVENTION. 




r 





DIRECTOR, mi 


2/2S/72 


SAC, mmx <80-1353) (P> 


nwm 


Enclosea for the Bureau is a eou? of a solf-ex plauatogy 
jaeaorauduffi dated 2/7/72, fro» Captain I I HiaBii 

BeaeSi Police Bepartneat, t/ith regard to contact witli Hiaoi 
Beacli Police Bepartnoat hj represent atitrcs of the C<»:fiauttit? 
Eelati ons-S e r - yi ce <CRS>^ ^ehis nemoraadum i»as a^de 'available 
to'a representative of the Hiami Office on 2/18/72. 

At his request, Chief BOCKS' POMEEAKCE, Miawl Beach 
police Department, \?aa furnished pertinent portions of the 
government OrganiJsational Manual showing authority for estafollsh- 
Kont of the €®S under the Civil Bights Act of 1964, This is 
a federal function aiialnistered hy the United States Department 
of Justice. 

The Bureau’s coments are solicited regarding any 
previous cnperieaco it has had with tho CBS. 


S - ISureau <Eae. 1) 
Jliaiai 
J€B/rec 

< 8 ) ^ 






fu '/3S3 -py 


ir' tr' 


# t 

DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION PLANNING SUMMARY, FEBRUARY 24. 1972 


OLD BUSINESS 

1. Security for Public Utilities 


2. Training and procedures for 
mass arrests, etc. 


REQUIRED ACTION OR ACTION TAKEN 


Captain meeting initially 

with Adams of Morida Power & Light, 
Guthrie, People's Gas, and Tahlbor, 
Miami Beach Water Supervisor. 

Captain RMBPD) to correspond 
with Was hington. U.C., etc. Major 

~| to contact Alsbury, Sandstrum 
and City of Miami and County I D 
Supervisors, etc .1 1 to 


Arrest powers for Miamt officers In most instances, actual arrests will 
assigned to Miami Beach during be made by Beach police assigned with 
Convention. Miami nersonnel for that purpose. Maj 


4. Convention manpower assistance 
to be assigned by Miami and 
County. 

5. Intelligence 

6. Acceptable area for: 

(a) Campsites 

(b) Forum sites 

7. Inventory of materials 


8. Convention security missions 
to be requested of other 
agencies. 

NEW BUSINESS 

1. Park, curfew, trespass and 
other supportive legislation 


Miami pe rso nnel for tha t purpose. Major 

and to research 

dep utl zl ng procedures with City Attorney 

Miami and County staff representatives 
to ascertain and advise at future 
planning session. 

Agencies who have not done so will 
exchange names of intelligence officers 
assigned to Convention. 

Though premature, staff requested to 
research and to low key any proposals. 


Mutual aid agencies not having done 
so, requested to update. County has 
finalized. Miami awaiting purchase 
of new materials. 

To be revi ewed with Colonel 
Maj or I l and other affected sta 

members. MBPD assigned to front of 
Convention complex. 


Miami and County covered. Major ! 
to confirm Miami Beac h positio n w ith 
City Att orney. Ma.ior l l and ! I 

to submit ordinance "package." 










OPTIONAL FORM NO. 10 
MAY 1962 EDITION 
GSA FPMR (41 CFR) 101-11.6 

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

Memorandum 




TO 


FROM : 


subject: 


DATE' 

SAC, MIAMI (80-1353) '2/18/72 

ASAC FREDERICK F. FOX 
DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION 


[ 


Inpw.s. Room, Channel TV 10, Miami, 
telephonically advised at 


Florida, telephone 

4:40 PM, 2/18/72 [has interviewed Constable 

IVAN NACHMAN and that this interview will appear on 
Channel 10 at 6:00 PM tonight. 

In this interview, IVAN NACHMAN will discuss 
two separate revolutionary groups who are presently 
in north Dade County and are here in the Miami area 
to make plans to disrupt the Democratic National Con- 
vention. One group consists of three whites and one 
black and the other group consists of ten men from 
New York. They plan to have about 2500 in this area 
and had a meeting on 2/7/72. 

Constable NACHMAN supposedly saw many weapons 
in the possession of these peo ple who are s upposed to be 
professional revolutionaries. | also was under 

the impression that NACHMAN had reported thi^ informa^on_ 

to the ’’Department of Justice.' 

that I could find no one in this office who had received •/ 
this type of information from Constable NACHMAN 


too 

b7C 


Supervisor 
Channel 10 at 6:00 PUStt 


File 

FFF:klj 


notified who will monitor 






-/-5S-3- 




Buy U.S. Savings Bonds Begalarly on the Payroll Savings Plan 











MM. 80-1353 


i.ndices show that, by letter to Miami 10/15/70 


captioned 
Office advised tha' 




%mmn 


It is noted that in connection With preparation for 
the Democratic National Convention, a group calling itself 
"Miami Snowplow Company" has made public its plans for "Operation 
Snowplow." ®his is to consist of the inviting of various 
dissident groups and individuals to Miami during the Convention 
to make known their wishes through peaceful demonstrations. 

Ihis group plans to set up a Besurrection type city with free 
room and lodging for the dissidents and the group is cooperating 
wiidi the Miami Beach Sl ice Department and Democratic National 
<k>nvention authorities 


IiEaDS 


oonjMBm 


AT COLOMBIA, S.C 


ill obtain background info 
through established source 





DEMOCRATIC CONVP’TIQN PLANNING SUMMARY, FEBr'ftRY 24 , 1972 


N 4* 


d 6. 


BUSINESS ’ j 

Security for Public Utilities 


Training and procedures for 
mass arrests, etc. 


REQUIRED ACTION OR ACTION TAKEN 


Capt ainI [ meeting initially 

with I I of Florida Power & Light, 

Guthne, People's Gas, and TaWbor, 
Miami Beach Water Supervisor. 


Captain 
with Wa< 


(MBPD) to correspond 


with Was hington. D.C.. etc, 
to contact Alsbury, 
ana uity of Miami and Count^ 
Supervisors, etc. I 
res earch with Judges 
and! I 


Major 
Sandstrum 
' ID 

I to bb 

I b7C 


Arrest powers for Miami officers In most instances, actual arrests will 
assigned to Miami Beach during be made by Beach police assigned with 
Convention. Miami personnel for tha t purpose. Major 

I ] to research 

deputizing procedures with City Attorney, 

Convention manpower assistance Miami and County staff representatives 
to be assigned by Miami and to ascertain and advise at future 

County. planning session. 


Intel 1 igence 


Acceptable area for: 

(a) Campsites 

(b) Forum sites 

Inventory of materials 


Convention security missions 
to be requested of other 
agencies . 

BUSINESS 

Park, curfew, trespass and 
other supportive legislation 


Agencies who have not done so will 
exchange names of Intelligence officers 
assigned to Convention. 

Though premature, staff requested to 
research and to low key any proposals. 


Mutual aid agencies not having done 
so, requested to update. County has 
finalized. Miami awaiting purchase 
of new materials. 

To be reviewed with Colonel l 
Major] land other affected staff 

member^ wbHU assigned fo front of 
Convention complex. 






Miami and County covered 
to confirm Miami Beach nt 
City At torney. Major 


ajor| 
ion W Ttn 
Hand I I 


to submit ordinance "package. 'b 

.^tNlB'EXE'D;. ' T 



' FEB_2_aJQ2au' 


4 , 'i , ■' -.7 ' 








Iml 


DICLASSIFICATIOII AUTHORITY DERIVED FROM: 
FBI automat:^ DECLASSIFICATIOH OUIDE ■ 

DATE 02"09”«fe 


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 




In Reply, Please Refer to 

ff/eA^o. CG 100-44375 


FEDERAL BUREAU OF' INVESTIGATION 

Chicago, Illinois 
February 24, i972 


3NTIAL 


YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY 
(YIP) 

On February 18, 1972, first source made available 
a circular that was being distributed on the north side of 
Chicago, Illinois, that was captioned and reported 

”ZIPPIE IN ’72 

LKT the ROCK SPEAKl Support freedom of speech in 
front of ABC offices 190 N* STATE St . , Chicago 
; PROTEST ABC refusal to give our CANDIDATE equal time 

FEB. 22 HI NOON 


BE, THERE... 


more info 525-3776«^ 


The Illinois Bell Telephone Conpany, Public Information 
3SS Service, advised on Febr ua ry 18, 1972, phone nu mber 
ia listed tol I atF I 



On February 18, 1972.1 

A^mericisH Broadcasting Company, 
WLS-TV (AbC-TV), 190 North StAte Street, Chicago, Illinois, was 
advised by a Special Agent (SA) of the ddlcago Office of the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) of the planned demonstration 
on February 22, 1972, at the ABC-TV offices in Chicago, 

Mr. Heider advised he would consult the legal office of ABC-TV 
in New York City concerning the manner iaa which the activities 
( should be handled. 




'TeONFIDSNTIAL 

GrouJr>3^^ 

Exclude^]^^>*!^^Automatic 
Downp?^^ng a!ld^^ 
Detflassification 


This document contains neither recommen^tions nor conclusions 
of the FBI. It is the property of the and is loaned to your 
agency. It and its contents are ' >^ ^{;y ibut outside 

your agency, lsERiALiZE’n/:2:iFiLED 

E£e2 8i9>2>^ / 




YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY 
(YIP) 



YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY 

The Youth International Party, also known as Yippies, 
is a loosely knit, anti-establishment, revolutionary 
youth organization formed in New York City in January, 

1968. ■ ■ 

On February 22, 1972 supra, 

advised he had contacted the legal office of ABC-TV, New York 
City, and was advised' if a group appeared as scheduled to 
receive a spokesman from tne group to determine what specific 
demands of ABC-TV were being made. The demands on being b 7 c 

determined were to then be relayed to the legal office in 
New York City. If demands were legitimate in nature, 
appropriate consideration would be given concerning them. 

l advised ABC-TV had not been contacted by anyone 
representing a iDrotest group for any reason or concerning 
equal TV time in behalf of a candidate for elective office 
sponsored by such a group. 

On February 22, 1972, SAs of the FBI observed 
approximately 12 young adults, all Caucasians, including 
three women, gather at about 11:30 a.m, in front of the 
ABC-TV building, 190 North State Street, Chicago, Illinois, 

The group formed a circle on the sidewalk in front of the 
building and began to chant as they marched carrying signs 
with their words of their chant. Slogans of the chant and 
on the signs included "ZIPPIE”, "Free Howard Hughes", 

"Hey, Hey ABC, Put Our Rock on TV", "Youth Can't Be Taken 
For Granite", "U".S‘, Out of North America" and "Vote Rock 
in ’72". 


Cl 





I I 


YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY 
(YIP) 


Several demonstration participants spoke to 
passerbys: telling them ABC had refused to allow their 
presidential candidate equal campaign time on the network. 

On gaining any interest from a passerby^ demonstrators 
would call one of the demonstration participants who carried, 
a red, white and blue towel, v/ith white stars on it, draped 
on a pillow on which a rock was placed. The demonstrators 
would tell the passerby that the rock was their candidate. 
The demonstration participants all appeared to' be good 
natured and the entire affair was conducted in a carnival 
manner. The demonstrators were frequently heard telling 
peoi^le to be "happy". No effort was made to enter the 
ABC-TV building, contact ABC officials or impede building 
or sidewalk traffic. The demonstrators sold a single sheet 
centerfold newspaper called "JOY" for five cents a copy and 
handed out leaflets announcing the ABC-T¥ demonstration that 
was in progress. The leaflet passed out was the one 
obtained by source one and set out above. 

The demonstration group voluntarily disbanded 
at 1:15 p,m, without incident and no arrests were made. 

No representatives of the TV or news media were observed 
on the scene' at anytime during this activity. During the 
entire incident uniform officers of the Chicago Police 
Department were on the scene, 

* » 

Among those identifie d bv an^SA of t he FBI who 


observed the demonstratxon werej 

and 

New Left street activists in Chicago , 


[also called 
"aJ.! self-identified 


On February 22, 1972, | | supra, 

ABC-TV, Chicago, advised no representative of the 
demonstrating group made or attempted to make contact 
with ABC-TV, Chicago, management prior to. during or o n 
completion of the demonstration activity. | [ stated 

ABC-TV, Chicago, did not cover the activity professionally 
for airing as a news item and official policy of ABC-TV 
was to ignore the entire incident , 


CO] 






I > 




YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY 
(YIP) 


On February 22, 1972, source one, who was a 
passive participant in the ABC-TV, Chicago, demonstration, 
made available a copy oi the single sheet centerfold 
newspaper captioned "JOY" which was sold for five cents 
a copy during the demonstration. The following is a 
reproduction of that publication. 


I . - . . - 







Terisa and Theodore people 
are two major organizers and 
campaigners of the Zippies, 

They are pictured here at right || 
taking a well-deserved break || 

from thier heavy scheduals. ■ * w 
t'erisa, a political cam- 1 1 

paign veteran, is the per- , I \ 
son most responsible for the ■ 
nomination of ROCK as the ' 

Zip presidential candidate, 

Theodore, the Zippie.pub- .• .• 

licity director, is making ■, ’ 

sure that ROCK will receive ■ If" 
as much exposure aspossi’ole, ^ I, . 
Theodore has been success- \ 
ful in ‘the campaign of Ms -V: 
pr As candidate, GUN, also 
pieWod at right 
The loving couple will be in 
both Miami and San Diego, work- y, . 

|ig for victory for ROCK.' They' ^ ^ ' 

[lope to meet you, soon. ■ . 



I J IV 



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.10 POINT PROGRAii 

f 

'.'I I FREE HOWARD HUGmSI 
, I 0 |ALLPOLmCALPRLSOiIERS.' | 

; I FEEEElffiRYTHBG if 1^ '| 

,w 

„L EVERYTHING FOR FRSeI: 'I 


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LISE ALL LAWS |? !.| 

-’nwr.iw'RMiHr’ir""''” ■■ •’ 


abolishallgoverimentII- 


I 'mV' w. 

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S MMHkUUiLM -^"-Iflllltl ] 

ABOLISH all JAILS |. 


i ,_ ,!l.fla... > 

ABOLISH ALL PAl j 


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ABOLElHALLEVILj ife; 

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.ilib.ak. ^ 1} U!' 


MASSECSTACY ,i 


(fill in your own) 


^pt'rsrr'rrri 


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JANUARY 

^-Illinois nominating con- 
' ®ntion. Chosing the local 
rock candidate and plan- , 
ning a state strategy. Too ■■ 
late for this one, you ai-' , 
ready missed it 
FEBRUARY 

; ,22- Demonstration in front; 
• ^ of ABC studios at 190 N, •' 
State street. This is in 
protest of the network's ■ 
refusal to give our candi- 
date equal time. The de- 
monstration takes place at ' 
noon. Dress colorfully,' 


18-26- Spring Freek Week 
■ Meetings of YIP & ZIP chap- 
ters. Also colossal YIP-ZIF 
voter registration. Help hang 
^ jury today. 

APRIL' 

(March 31,) 1,2-- April Fool 
Zippie Benefits in Chicago, 
Midison, Milwaukee, Bands 
will include David Peel, 
Teenage Lust, Live Bait and 
perhaps a super surprise, 


MAI 

^ , 1-Maj? Day is J-Day. Giajit 
' ■ smoke-in in Lincoln' Park. Al- ' ’ 
so spring plant-in,, bring your' 

' seeds. " “ ' 


. 1-3“ National Tribal Congress 
■"'in Washington D.C.- Assembly 
of Free Nation Tribes. 

4-Third Annual ' Reefer Smoke- 
' In 'at the Washington Monum'ent. 

' '9-15- Zippie Freek Circus in Mi- 
ami. Details on page two and 
•.three. 

AUGUST 

, ; 1-20- Grapes of Wrath Caravan 
• " to California. Junked busses, ■ 

stolen dune buggies, Zipelins,etc. 

, 21-24- San^ Diego Republican 
, ' convention. We've'got Dick ^ ' ■ 

' Nixon to kick around again. 


iv':r »' r I s 

i' :lOy 

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fc' f-'* ^ i' • 

S h t.'/ . ' .• Mu. ' '..'I 


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^i'IF2I?2iF2IPZIP2IP2TPj jOYOUS'"SCENE AT LAST ZlPPlf 


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' rf l'.ii. .|*.V ,iW! , * 

IF modtiT urn HIPPIES 
mnifiEm, 
msoMMs 

wmmpis .'! 

■.•i f A; ■ fl 


^ V,i6., i,iU iiWiiiili jj. 






GOOD TIMES 


We call ourselves ZIPPIES because what our scene has lacked 
for the past four years is ZIP. ZIPPIFS have ZIP. We're past 
hippies, and beyond yippies. After Y comes Z. We're Zippies. Our 
program is simple— Peace Now, Freedom Now. We believe in 
good times for all. Vv’e feol if wc are going to achieve Utopia, 
somebodv'has to get die ball rolling. 


,'4 

V ■' ■ 
p, 1 1 






>4^ 


end 

& 


-Tncit ^ ^ /SJ, 

orimariesr ''S- our interest to go will change the drift of the 

^ regular Dems wahe up & see we’re not goi'no- tn 

let ‘.em coii anyboiiy. The conventions are the solar plexus of the 
syste’m. The outlines of San Diego have already become clear. But, 

• - we are much 

, ' . • into Miami 

. " ■ • because We're from 

. the eastern 

, . of the country 

be- cause it’ll be ; 

", • _ different from either 

San. Diego or Chil’own ‘68. 

■ The. governor there - . ' 

is a Lindsavite 
• i^emocrai. The regular 

Dems are anxious . , ■" 

• not to screw tip their ; • . , ' - 

. new youthful image. . • . . ' ' ■ ' • 

They will welcome youth 

, ■' & try to channel us into rock . , • , • 

concerts & meaningless ’ • . ’ ' ' . 

be to make US into window dres ■ ■ • 

bing for the same old . • • . . 

shit. Our go5l Will . • ' . \ 

be to expose it. • ' • - . • 

In • /2 YIP and Zir represents ix speaks for It h ' 

. ^ just freekb, nat just youths. In '72,we're for\„e humanTit;"®' 

^ ^ 2 rocks will be chosen as 

^the YIP-XIP -slate" tor office, wa’ce feeing to show that the youth' ilote 
'Jean t be taKeu for granite, we re gonha rock the boat in '72, We want 
o catapu.^t our rock luto cne v-Jhitc House. Make *72 one big rock festival 










If 


Cast your vote with the rock. 




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it 

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■ PARTY DOWN FOLKS •* 

This will be no ordinary party, it will require committment and 
dedication. It will be long and arduous. Only the most serious 
partiers should plan to attend. This party will make the Shah of 
Iran's look like.bruoch. 



n 


N n-O - 
Li#4.a,h| 


?.r 

d 









. . Lks 







‘J i ix 


Some of the events are as follows: ‘ ' 

Underground film screenings. Classics from Europe and America. 

■ Videotape screenings. Experiments and TV shows from all over. 

Record party. Make it or break it. 1000's of records will be 
played, ana the crowd will vote by thumb whether the record makes 
it or not. Each person v;ill get a turn with the sledge hammer. 
Records will be recent releases from record industry. ... 

Pajama party. Every night. ■ : 

Poetry readinos. ' L . 

M usic. . . 

DAVID PEEL AND THE LOWER EAST SIDE, 
TEENAGE LUST, THE DOLLS, An extra- 
si.)9cial "superstar" who has just 
turned human, YOU, P-'IE and lots more. 
Super slide. 20 greyed feet into a plastic pool filled with jello. 
Kissing booth. Male and female, gay and straight. Upon special 
request there will dogs, sheep, and chickens available. 

Pie Time. 500 whipped cream pies and a yen for revenge. 


- -'"x \ P' ."- V ^ 



Please send all contiributions 
registered 8 

New ADDressr 


•ZIP 

2550 N. Halsted 
Chicago* Illo 60614 


- 10 - 




IS i 


i 



iiyAcJi 


The Zippies are going to 
Miami. Nixon visits Mao in 
China. Huey Newton tells 
the oanthers ' to put .down 
the gun ■ and pick up. a ham- 
mer. Gloria Steinem ' dates 
Henry Kissinger. Jerry 
Rubin tells Idds to bring ■ 
their parents to San Diego, 
And the Zippies are' going 
to Miami. 

party v;as formed in a smoke-- 
filled room in Madison Wiscon- 
.sjn. There, about 35 former 
hippies, vippies, weatherpeople 
and other assorted freeks, met 
to discuss the future of the 
american cultural-political . . 
movement. , ... 

The meeting began with a 
(mass cry-in, where every- 
ione expressed thicr grief over 
'the death of joy. The culture 
had been taken over by hip-rip: 
offs like Rolling Stone magazine 
(Rolling Stone is owned by the 
Kinny Leasufe Time Co, These 
same people own 75% of. the re- 
cpi;d_companies, and are re- 
sponsible for record price in- 
creases you have been noticing 
lately), Ther^^as much crying 
over the deatnmusic of James 
Taylor and Cat Stevens, which 
hrd gotten thousands of young 
people off of the $2 dance floors 
into thc^>-..>5 concert seats. 

The Movement didn’t look ■ 
a whole lot better. It 
seemed that no .one was 
smiling very much any more. 
People were split into little 
groups, and- none of them were 
doing much of anything except 
writing books. Also there were 
a lot of super-stars running 
aroimd, and people waited for 
them to do. things rather than 
doing them for themselves. . 


We ' w^teT* somelhi^ 
would put the Zip back .in 
the youth-culture and back 
in the movement. VJe wanted 
to ressurect those bodies mat 
had been zombif ied by the 
i ■■ Jesus Freaks. . So the Zippies 
I were born, .. ... -.I.-- . 

‘There would be no Zippie 
superstars, no hardline ^ 
Zippie ideology, no Zip- 


. pie ripoffs. We were go- 

-| 'ingto Miami to have an .- 
I ' alternate convention. A ‘ 

\ ■■ five day party to show the 
rest of the country and 
i the world that our party 

; ■ is the only real party. 

' The Democrats, Republicans, 

•- Communists? -You call those 

parties? I’ve had more f'un at 

a Wake. ; ; 

-i We knov/ that there is no 
■' ‘ choice -'between Nixon and 
Muskie, Each party talks 
, about the youth vote. 

-: We are running a 

- -rock for president.. 
We don’t want 
- . ' • ■ your vote. 






vote, Muskie was booed 
off the Univ. of Wisconsin 
speakers platforni, and 
everybody hates Nixon. The 
real po'wer is not in the bal- 
lot or the bullet, but in the 
body. It is the power to have . 
a -good time when the rest of 
the world i.s tr.ying to des^troy. 
you. There is no defense 
. against joy. , . • ‘ ■ | 

■ Women like Eernadine Dohrn 
and Angela uavis gave niaa^ 
the will and need to fight for 
‘.freedom and ]oy. ‘ . .. _ 

' ■ Now it is time' for us to act 
on our own. We can’t rely, 
on Eernadine or Abbie or 
• Jerry or Angela, We must 
begin to do things ourselves. 

' Saying ‘Right On'’ to what 
others are doing isn’t any 
good any more. Each of us 
must become her own sup- 
erstar. - . ■ ' 

. TWO WORDS 

■' A Word About 'Superstars: • 
Men like the conspiracy ' 
-seven .have done a lolP®^ = 
for the movement. They were 
oganizors and inspirations for 
large numbers of american / 
youth, 

A Word About The ROCK; 
The Zippies nom.inated a 
-rock for president so that , 

. we could .avoid s'aperstars, 

‘' . Who coidd' idolize a rock ? 

- Also, rock (of... and Roll 
fame) is part of the Zip- 
pie culture. Finally) the 
rock will never be able 
to give a serious answer 
i to a question. It will be 
-■ psrmanately stoned. 










' 'i *. .^“e*'*‘.»*%.-. *&■“!!-> 


3 . ^ , .^*-«.«vaw-'.jc,« *>4;.Jj-.»*a#^i<5V.’.';V'4.v» . wJ, . .j'* .'.*i •** 


. ' n The Zippies are going to 

■ 1 San Diego, Leslie Bacon 
is ’n ■’Oil. nmiiom R^Vinmiist 
I j is in the Supreme Coirrt. May- 
■• i day people are in concentration 
; camps in Washington. And the 
• ; Zippies are going to San Diego. 

■ I ROCK, v;ho will have declared 

* his candidacy for president in 
i ! Miami, will switch parties, 

' taking John Lindsey’s place as 
. a Republican. . . 

■ ' H There will be a cross 

' country caravan from Mi- 
ami to San Diego. The 
; Rock will make whistle-. 

■ ■ ■ ' stops all along its path to 

• S.D. On this trio Rock will 

• . pick up thousands of sup- 

■ ' porters and they will ail 
1 arrive in S&n Diego to- 
gether. ,. 

• . Unlike Miami, San- Diego will 

have oeoole from groups other 

■ . than the Zippies. The May Day 
; .. • Tribe, Student Mobilization, 

■ and various assorted Trots, 

■- Peace Creeps, Stalinoids, and 
Subversives. The Zippies will 
join them bring joy. 

Zippie activities, however 
will aim to please only the 
vrarped Zippie minds. There 
-vkll be no street marches, only 
- , street dances, 

”■ ' ■ There will be no sneers on angry 

~ . faces, only tears of joy and hap 

Diness. JSIo one will be up against 

■ the wail. The wall will be torn dovm. 

Most important v/e v/ill refuse to be 
manipulated by parade marshells, or 
group spokesmen, or demonstration 
planners or anv one else. We will be 
ourselves. The Spirit of the times, 
coming to haunt Nixon and his ghosts 
of wartimes past. ■ • 

Yes, it will truely be. a confront- 
ation of souls this time-- Not 
bodies,, they have bigger and_ better 
guns than we have — but of spirits, 
life verses death, good verses evil. • 
And, if you’ve read your bible 
or your Marvel Comics, you know 

■ who ''.v/ill be the w,inner. 



i 


i 


I 


1 

1 


I 

i 


i 


YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY ~ T:0ITEIDENTIAL - 

(YIP) 


In regard to 
identified tthsl 


source two sthtsa 


I Source 

noted the calendar of events set forth ia "JOY*' is similar 
to events previously announced by YIP for activity through 
the summer of 1972, It was also observed the address 2550 
North Halsted, Chicago, listed in ”J0Y'* ibr sendi ng of 
contributions is the residence of I I 


be 

b7C 

b7D 


a third source advised \ 


others in, the demonstration, has been asss^ciated wi th the 
youth street political element in the Chicago area, | 
told source, during the demonstration, that the purpose of the 
event was a ”put on" of the lack of sinceaity of both 
consti tuted society and self-identified New Left leadership, 

I observed society and self -designated: liberal leadership 
have become so involved v/ith self -perpetuation in constituted 
images that their avowed idealistic dedication to the 
problems of society at large have been lost or completely 
overlooked' and the leaders hip of each eienent is now 
indistinguishable. compared the presidential "rock 

candidate" spoof to the same type of "put on" the YIP pulled 
in having, a "pig" who v/as called 'Pigusis for a presidential 
candidate during the 1968 presidential elections. 



\ 


I 





. - 

.. . • 

• 




YOUTH 

(YIP) 

INTERNATIONAL PARTY 

• 


DS^^IAL 



On February 22, 1972, a fourth source, who is in a 
position to know, but who has fur nished insufficient informa tion 
to estab lish i abi 1 i i:v . gidviaadr I 

~| phone I f 

ZIPPIES are members of the ’'Zeitgeist International Party”, the 
political arm of YIP« ZIPPIES are the free. youth spirit of 
the nation’s culture with no leadership element, rules or 
binding allegiance. Constituted leadersMp within organizational 
framework, as represented by Jerry Rubin and Abbie Hoffman, 
original founders of YIP, have been totally rejected. Rubin 
and Hoffman have completely degenerated into elitist personalities 
who have - lost the prospective of YIP movement freedom and are 
continuing struggling, no longer for the movement, but to 
manipulate and exploit the movement for self-identification as 
.spokemen and. leaders. Complete freedom is the objective of 
ZIPPIES as set out in the ten point program published in the 
”JOY” publication which was distributed at the ABC-TV 
demonstration. 

stated YIP-ZIPPIS plans be present at both 

the Democratic and Republican convention® during the summer of 
1972, A Hew York City branch of YIP, not further identified, 
has been in contact with city officials lat:. Miami, Florida, and 


negotiations are underway to provide for YIP-ZIPPIE 




in Miami, . assured absolutely no vaalence of any 

nature is adVbcated by YIP-ZIPPIE during any of their activities. 
He explained their complete approach to sewerything is absolute 
freedom, joy and love. They will express this thought during the 
summer of 1972 at both of the national psMtical conventions. 


2NTIAL 


16 - 





YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY 
(YIP) 


CONFIDENTIAL 


[related the demonstration conducted at 

ABC- TV, Chicago, v;aa condiactcd in the "JOY" manner to 
advocate the election of a "Rock" for president of the 
United States and to seek time for the "Rock" candidate 

on TV in the same manner of "put on" initiated by 

YIP in nominating a pig, who was called Pigusis, as their 
presidential candidate during the 1968 presidential 
elections. The complete a.pproach is a "spoof" to put some 
fun in the political election process, to spread joy and 
to laugh instead of becoming a part of a deadly serious 
process in the continuation of a bland society dedicated 
to misery, poverty and war. 

In regard to the ABC-TV demonstration of 
February 22, 1972, in Chicago, Board stated YIP-ZIPPIS 
did not have any specific reason or animosity in 
selecting ASIC-TV as the target for discr imi nat ion 
a,gainst their Rock presidential candidate. | | stated 

any TV station v/ould have been acceptable, but "ABC was 
the first TV station listed in the Chicago phone book 
so it was selected for the demonstration" . 


1^ I stated a rock music festival is planned 

March 31, 1972, at the IWV/ Hall, 2440 Nox'th Lincoln, 

Chicago, Illinois for the purpose of raising funds for 
YIP-ZIPPIS to be present at the 1972 Mi ami and San Uiego 
national political conventions. observed other 

events will also be announced in the future for the 
purpose of raising funds and to continue stimulation of 
interest in their activities. 

Sourc e stated as a result of this conversation -with 

I it is obvious YIP-ZIPPIE is not a functioning 
entity but at the most is only , an idea of a few would-be 
self-styled spokemen of an old theme that has been "palmed-off 
in the past as a meaningful expression of youth. YiP-ZIPPIE 
at the present is at the most a mass confusion v/ithout 
substance, a membership or even an identity support by any 
element of society, YIP-ZIPPIE influence will possibly be 
present at the 1972 political conventions. Unquestionably, 


CONF] 


JTIAL 


- 17 - 


-r 





YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY 
. (YIP) 



students, youth derelicts and the curious, who have nothing 
else to do during the summer of 1972, will gravitate to the 
political convention sites. They will appear because of 
the excitement of those events, in a word "v/here the action 
is", to observe or participate in the carnival atmosphere 
of rock music festivals, marijuana and other drugs, as well 
as promiscuous sex that will be advanced as being 
available during these events. The people of this ■ 
description who appear at the convention sites will be 
there because they want to be and not because they are a 
part of a plan or have been organized for mass disruptive 
activity. In this atmosphere, however, if there should be 
a confrontation incident, the self-styled leadership and 
their claques, such as YIP-ZIPPIE, could fan an incident into 
a nasty affair, and claim credit for disruption as the result 
of an imagined oi' an actual grievance of the masses. Such 
occurrances are absolutely essential for the perpetuation of the 
raegpiloraania of such proclaimed leadership and people 
of this nature v/ill be alert for incidents to utilize 
for their own personal notoriety. 



- 18 * - 


FD-323 (Re’v. 11-89-61) 



In Reply, Please Refer to 


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OE JUSTICE 


FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 

Chicago, Illinois 
February 24, 1972 


File No. 


CG 100-44975 


Title YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY (YIP) 


Character 

Reference Memorandum dated and captioned as 
above 


All sources (except any listed helov) vhose identities 
are concealed in referenced communication have furnished reliable 
info rraat ion in the past. 




This document contains neither recommendations nor conclusions of the FBI. It Is the property 
of the FBI and Is loaned to your agency; it and Us contents are not to be distributed outside 
your agency. 


(Rev, 5-22-64) 


Transmit the foll^' ing in 


Jj^LASSIFICATIOU AUTHORITY DIRIUID FROH: 
AUTOlttTIC DECLASSIFICATIOH GUIDl^^ 
DATE 02”09“201Z Vt 


Date: 


2/24/72 


(Typs in plaintext or code) 


(Priority) 


FlfflM: 

SUBJECT: 


DIRECTOR, FBI (100-448910) 

SAC, CHICAGO (100-44975) (P) 

YOUTH IITTERMATIONAL PARTY (YIP) 
IS-YIP 

(00: Nev/ York) 


Re Chicago tel to the Bureau dated 2/22/72, Chicago 
airtel and LKIl dated 1/25/72 and Milwaukee airtel and LHM dated 
i/28/72 regarding demonstration at ABC-TY on 2/22/72 in Chicago 
and YIP activity scheduled through the suaaaer of 1972. 

Bureau (Snc. 8) (RM) 

3 JL. Miami (100-16028) (Enc. 3) (RM) 

^ 1 - (100- ) (DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION, 1972) 

2 - Hilv/aukee (100-15948) (Enc, 2) (RM) ^ 

2 - New York (100-162260) (Enc. 2) (RM) 

2 “ San Diego • (100-15393) (Enc. 2) (Info) (RM) 

I - (100-16200) (REPUBLICAN NATIONAL CONVENTION, 1972) 


Chicago 

1 - (100-51867) 
1 - (100-52441) 
1 - (100-52505) 
1 - (100-45345) 
1 - 0-00-51505) 
1 - (100-48109) 
1 - (100-52504) 
1 - (100-50530) 


(REPUBLICAN NATIONAL CONVENTION, 1972) 
(DEMOCRATIC NATION AL CONVENTION, 1972) 


^RED STAR PRESS) 


GGP/jto 

(23) 


C 


f<— ^ 

Af •S‘-> 


1 SEARCHED. 
(SERIALIZE! 


.INDEXED 

brjILED 

2 819/a. 


Approved: 


Special Agent in Charge 


a. S. !£BOTERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1968 O - 346-090 (.•i) 



CG 100-44975 


Enclosed for the Bureau are eight copies of an LHM 
dated and captioned as above. Copies of the LHM are designated 
foi' oXficws as llsLsu Xoi' rectaipt uX this airtcl. 

Security investigations are currently being 
conducted by the Chicago Office regarding individuals 
identified in the enclosed LffiX. 


conducted by SA 


ABC-TV, Chicago 


The SAs v/ho 

in the enclosed LHM ar 


as partici 


-TV demonstration were made by SA| 


Sources utilized in the enclosed LHM are as follow 
First source is 


Third source is 


Fourth source is in a position to know, but has 
furnished insufficient inforraatsion to establish 
reliability. 

The enclosed LHM is classified 
because it contains information received from sources who 
furnished information in confidence and .requested that 
confidence be protected and also from sounrces of continuing 
value, the unauthorized disclosure of v;hic:h could reveal 
their identities, compromise their future effectiveness and 
thereby adversely grffect the security of the nation. 










CG 100-44975 




LEADS 

MIAMI 


AT MIAMI, FLORIDA. Will contact appropriate city 
officials of Miami and attempt to determine identity of New 
York City YIP-ZIPPIE group alleged to have negotiated for 
activity during 1972 Democratic National Convention and 
details of alleged agreement. 

MILWAUKEE 

AT MADISON, WISCONSI N. Will coatinue to closely 
follow activities of YIP-ZIPPIE group that area. 

KEVy YORK . • • 

AT NEW YORK CITY, NEW YORK . Will attempt to 
identify yTP-ZIPPIE group, New York City, which has 
allegedly negotiated with Miami, Florida, city officials 
for activities at 1972 Democratic National Convention. 

CHICAGO 

AT CHICAGO, ILLINOIS. Will continue to closely 
follov/ activities of this element. 


3 







FD-350 (Rev. 7-16-63) 


(Mount Clipping in Space Below) 


Conv^ntictn 

Snowplow 
is denied 
Metro aid 

By ROBERT STULBERG 

Miami News Reporter 

County Manager Ray 
Goode yesterday rejected a 
request for county funds 
from a coalition of liberal 
groups planning to assist 
protesters and other non-del- 
egates expected during the 
Democratic National Conven- 
tion in Miami Beach in July. 

Goode told The News that 
the county will not provide 
$6,500 requested last week 
by the coalition, the Miami 
Snowplow Company. 

“The question of whether 
the county has a financial re- 
sponsibility in this case has? 
been pretty much resolved,” 
Goode said. “The county will 
not be giving money to this 
organization.” 

■ 

Snowplow representatives 
sought the funds at a Metro 
Commission meeting Feb. 16. 
The funds, they said, would 
be used to defray basic oper- 
ating costs of the organiza- 
tion. 

At that meeting, a number 
of commissioners expressed 
opposition to the request but 
left the decision up to Goode. 

Goode explained he denied 
the request partly because 
Snowplow is a private orga- 
nization and the county, by 
law, cannot fund such a / 
group. ,• / 


In addition, he said he be- 
lieves the county — not 
Snowplow — can best pro- 

cervices f'^*' thnii- 

sands of non-delegates ex- 
pected at the convention. 

“We feel strongly that we 
would like to cooperate to 
help make this a peaceful 
convention for everyone 
here,” said Goode. “But we 
feel that services of this sort 
should be provided through 
the manager’s office.” 

Goode said that in the past 
Dade has been able to pro- 
vide housing and other emer- 
gency services during hurri- 
canes “and other natural di- 
sasters,” so it ought to be 
able to provide adequate ser- 
vices for non-delegates at the 
convention. 

He said Metro has an “on- 
going plan” to handle a large 
influx of non-delegates but 
that he did not care to de- 
scribe details of the arrange- 
ment. 

“We have a planning pro- 
cess under way,” Goode said, 
“one that will continue until 
' the Democratic Convention 
and one that will not receive 
I a good deal'Of puhdicity.” 


(Indicate page, name of 
newspaper, city and state. 




MIAMI NEWS 


MIAMI, FLORIDA 


Date: 2/25/72 


Title: DEMOCRATIC 
NATIONAL CONVENTION 

Character: 

or 

Classification : 80-1353 
Submitting Office: MIAMI, FLA, 

I I Being Investigated 






idl4-nlM££- I 


OPTIONAU FORM NO. 10 

MAY 1962 EDITION 

GSA FPMR (41 CFR) 101-11.6 


UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

Memorandum 


SAC, MIAMI (80-1353) (P) 


date: 


2/28/72 


MIDEM 


Re memo of ASAC FREDERICK F. FOX, 2/18/72, with 
regard to a possible televised interview of Constable IVAN 
NACHMAN on that date. 

The ABC News Program on Channel 10, from 6; 00 to 
7:00 p.m. , 2/18/72, was monitored and no interview of NACHMAN 
appeared on this program. However, on the 11 o’clock newscast 
of PRESCOTT ROBINSON, Channel 4, a short interview of NACHMAN 
was conducted by a Channel 4 Newsman during which time NACHMAN 
alleged that he had received information from his "undercover 
agents" to the effect that two groups in Miami are planning 
demonstrations during the Democratic National Convention 
which could well errupt into violence. According to NACHMAN, 
one of his "undercover agents" had observed weapons in posses- 
sion of these men. 



0 - 80-1353 
JCB/rec 
) 


FEB 2 8197^ 

FBi — t^liAfv}!/ 



Buy U.S. Savings Bonds Kegularly on the Payroll Savings Plan 




09 vRev. 5-18-71) 


Transmit in Via Airtel 

(Type in plaintext or code) 


( Priority) 


To: SAC, Albany 

From: Director, FBI 

^^ALREP 
MIDEM 


Date _ 2/22/72 



ReBuairtel to Albany, 11/2/71, captioned ’'Demonstrations 
During the Forthcoming Political Campaign" and Buairtel to Albany, 
1/19/72, captioned "Demonstrations During the Democratic National 
Convention," 

Referenced communications instructed that information 
developed concerning demonstrations at the national conventions of 
the major political parties should be submitted using the code 
words "CALREP" and "MIDEM." 

It appears that some field offices have misconstrued 
these instructions. On an increasing number of occasions, 
communications have been received at the Bureau under one or the 
other above caftions (CALREP or MIDEM) which do not directly relate 
to demonstrations at the conventions. Such communications should 
have been carried under substantive case titles even though the 
organizations or individuals involved were in some way connected 
with demonstrations at the conventions. 


Where the communication relates makily to an organization 
or individual b ut wnere there is also a collateral interest in 
CALREP or MIDEM, communications should carry dual~captions ; 
substantive'captxon~cari?xed“first^n<f“ihe CALREP or MIDEM 'caption 
carried secondly. Of course, this applies only to intr a'-Bureau , 
communica t ions , Letterhead memoran^ and r e port gflnten'ded -for 
dissemination should carry only the subst^tive titl e or in case of 
information relating only to cAlrep or MIDEM. the caption s hould 
read "Demonstrations During the Republican National Conv ent ion. ’ 

San Diego, California, August. 1972.'^ o r "Demonstrations During th e 
democratic National Convention. Miami. Florida, July, 1972," 







Airtel to Albany 
Re : CALREP 

MIDEM 


You should assure that personnel preparing 

tTItYll 1 *S*^ 4“ l-» O ^ •*>«#« ^ ^ ^ ^ _ 

» ^ — Mm-% w w 4,^ M>fv4A V> x>4- iuiiw iM>».^OVW 

instructions so that these communications will carry proper 
captions in the future » 


T 



m 


• 

TO: 

Intelligence File 

DATE: 

February 21 , 1 972 

FROM: 

Captain 

SUBJECT: 

JERRY RUBIN 
STU ALPERT 


Jerry Rubin and_Stu Alpert spoke at the University of Miami, Friday, te 

i-ebruary 11, 19/2. Rubin announced that they were "orcjanlziriQ b?c 

something big here for the convention". Said his Information 
indicated some 15,000 people, predominatly yippies and zippies would 
commute here from Chicago, California, New York and New Jersey. He 
commented that there would be enough marijuana on hand for all. 

Stu Alpert claimed to be responsible for motivating the yippies and 
zippies for coming to Miami Beach. 

He warned that long-haired scientists who had previously worked for 
the government were now disenchanted with the establishment and were 
endeavoring in basements to concoct chemicals similar to LSD to dump 
in the water systems causing everyone in Miami to "blow their minds". 

They advised that some 3,000 "gay people" intended to march down the 
streets of Miami Beach kissing one another. 

At the conclusion, Stu Alpert appologized for his speech delivery 
explaining that he had been "tripping" for a couple of days and 
consequently was not himself. 


Captain 


BDK:eji 





S®fALl2EDf£:2., 


INDEXED.......... 

mFILEO.,^. 

FEB 2 41972 


FBI — MIAMI 








FD-350 (Rev. 7-16-63) 


(Mount Clipping in Space Below) 


St. Loliis 
Gets Party 
Convention 

National People’s' Party of- 
ficials announced in Wash- 
ington Monday that they 
have rejected Miami Beach 
and accepted St. Louis site 
for their nominating conven- 
tion in July. 

The surprise announce- 
ment came after «a two-day 
policy meeting and 8-3 vote 
of the party’s national steer- 
ing committee. 

Miami Beach officials 
agreed last month to give the 
party use of the Miami Beach 
Convention Hall for four 
days following the Democrat- 
ic National Convention. 

PEOPLE’S PARTY nation- 
al chairman Charles Briody 
said committee members felt 
that the “Miami Beach atmo- 
sphere in July will be that of 
a circus and fiasco, not con- 
ducive to formation of a rea- 
sonable new radical electoral 
alternative.” 

Kunst said People’s Party 
members will demonstrate at 
the Democratic Convention 
July 9-1,5 before retiring to 
St. Louis for their own nomi- 
nating conclave during the 
last week of July. 

The Party’s Florida State 
Convention is set for March 
18 in Orlando. 

People’s Party presidential 
candidate Dr. Benjamin 
Spock arrives in Miami today 
for speeches at: 10 a.m. at 
Miami-Dade Junior College 
South Campus; 11:30 a.m. at 
the North Campus and at 
12:30 p.m. at Tiger Bay polit- 
ical club.‘' 



(Indicate page, name of 
newspaper, city and state*) 


MIAMI HERALD 


MIAMI, FLORIDA 


Date: 2 / 29/72 

Edition: 


Title: democratic 
NATIONAL CONVENTION 

Character: 

or 

Classification : 80-1353 
Submitting Office: MIAMI, FLA. 

I I Being Investigated 


r 


FEB 2 9 1972 


laadRfegi 




{Upon removal of classified enclosures, if any, this transmittal form becomes 
UNCLASSIFIED.) 




DECLASSIUjCATIOH AUTHORITY DERIVED FROM; 

FBI AUTC^^aC DECLASSIFICATIOIJ GUIDI 
DATE OZ-W*loi2 


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 


FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 


In Reply, Please Refer to 
File No. 


Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
February 25, 1972 


Confiii^tial 


YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY (YIP) SPONSORED 
DEMONSTRATION AGAINST A1>1ERICAN BROADCASTING 
CORPORATION (ABC), CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, 
FEBRUARY 22, 1972 

DEMONSTRATIONS DURING THE DEI'IOGRATIC 
NATIONAL CONVENTION, JULY, 1972, 

MIAMI, FLORIDA 


(Reference is made to Milwaukee memorandum dated 
January 28, 1972, captioned, "Youth International Party 
Presidential Nominating Convention, January 23, 1972, Chicago, 
Illinois," and, "Demonstrations During the Democratic National 
Convention, July, 1972, Miami, Florida,") 


YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY 

The Youth International Party 
(YIP), also known as Yippies, is a 
loosely knit, anti-establishment, 
revolutionary youth organization 
formed in New York City in January, 
1968, 



^ Excluded^.»oTfi'««gjj^oiriatic 

This document contaxns neither recommendations nor conclusions of 
the FBI. It is the property of the FBI and is loaned to your agency; 
it and its contents are not to be distributed agenc y . 


SEARCHED..... 

SERlALIZED_y 


^INDEXED... 
.FILED 

21972 




■ Confi^ntial 

•W‘ ^ 

YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY (YIP) 
SPONSORED DEMONSTPvATION AGAINST 
AMERICAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION (ABC), 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, FEBRUARY 22, 1972 

DEMONSTRATIONS DURING THE DEMOCRATIC 
NATIONAL CONVENTION, JULY, 1972, 

MIAMI, FLORIDA 


to be held on February 22, 1972, against the American Broadcasting 
Corporation (ABC), 190 North State Street, Chicago. The purpose 
of this demonstration was to demand of ABC "equal time for our 
candidate, the Rock." YIP activists were going to show the "Rock" 
to ABC so that this candidate could be introduced to the rest 
of the county via the news media. YIPs plan to take the candidate 
to Miami during the summer of 1972, for the YIP Presidential be 

Nominating Convention to be held during the same time that the tec 

Democratic Presidential Convention is in progress. 



proceeded to ABC, beginning their demonstration at approximately 
11:30 a.m. along with no more than ten-fifteen other individuals. 
The demonstration consisted of parading on the sidev/alk in front 
of ABC in a picket line manner carrying the "Rock" on a pillow. 

The demonstrators convinced passers by to touch the "Rock" and to 
give their support to it for the forthcoming YIP Miami Convention, 
Source said^that a few unidentified individuals in the crowd who 
v/ere observing the demonstration joined the picket line. There 
were no apparent arrests or incidents and at approximately 1:15 p.m. 
the Madison people left the area and proceeded back to Madison, 


Confictential 


Con: 




YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY (YIP) 
SPONSORED DEMONSTRATION AGAINST 
AMERICAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION (ABC), 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, FEBRUARY 22, 1972 

DEMONSTRATIONS DURING THE DEMOCRATIC 
NATIONAL CONVENTION, JULY, 1972, 

ML AMI , FLORIDA 


No post-demonstration meetings V7ere announced for January 
and no comment was made by the demonstrators regarding the success 
- of their efforts to confront ABC for publicity. 

« 

Source said, according to infortpation available to him, 
the demonstrators were not successful in meeting^ with ABC 
personnel nor was any entry made into the ABC building in an 
attempt for a meeting. It is not kno\'7n whether ABC will give 
publicity to the YIP “Rock. ** 

Source learned that YIP activists in Chicago are using 
the address of 950 West Wrightwood Street (second floor, telephone 
353-3776). 

The "Rock” displayed at ABC will allegedly be taken to 
Miami to be run as the YIP candidate for the Illinois YIP Chapters. 



Confident ial 


FD-36 (Hov. 5-22-64) 


Transmit the following in 


Via AIRTEL 


DICLASSIFICATIOII AUTHO^^Y DERIVED FlOHf 
FBI AUTOHATIC DEC LAS S iHBaT I OH GUIDE ] 

DATE 02-10-Z01Z ! 

FBI i 


Date: 2/25/72 


(Type in plaintext or code) 

AIRMAIL- REGISTERED 

(Priority) 


TO: DIRECTOR, FBI 

1 

FROM? ' SAG , MILWAUKEE 

SUBJECT: YOUTl-I INTERNATIONAL PARTY (YIP) 

IS - YIP 


(MI 100-15948) 
(Bufile 100-448910) 


DEt-IONSTR/iTION DURING THE FORTHCOMING 
POLITICAL G/MPAIGN 
(MI 100-18949) 

MIDEM 

(MI 100-19451) 

5“Bareau (Enc. 13) (AM-Rf4) 

2-(100~448910) 

I-(IOO-CALREP) 

1-(100-MIDE4) . ^ 

1- ( 100-Demonstration-Political Campaign) 
4-C'hicago (EM) (Enc. 4) 

l-( 100-YIP) . . 

1 ~(1 nn~n,nrrinngf--rai-n nrt-Pnl itlcal Campaign) 

1 - ( iool 1 — 

i-(ioo-| 

3 -Miami (Enc. 3) (RM-AM) 

1- (100-YIP) 

(!>•( 100-Demonstration Political Campaign) 
l-(100-MIDEi4) 

8 -Mi 1 wauke e 
1-(100-15948) 

1-(100-18949) 

1-(100-19451) , , 

1-(100-1&557) I D 

1-(100-17598; (I 

1- ClQO-1816 7’) ( I 

2- (100~new) T 

TRM:mhb . 

(20) r 


/fST- 


<rc 


Approved: 


Special Agent in Charge 


SEARCHED INDEXED — 

SERIALIZED-^.^FILED 




FBI — KlIMIvil 


|L» 


U. S. GOVERNMENT PRiNTING OFFIC^1071 -413-135 




<«« 






MI 100-15948 

Re Milwaukee airtel to Bureau dated 1/28/72. 

Re airtel enclosed an LHM setting forth information regarding 
the Youth International Party (YIP) Presidential Nominating 
Convention held on 1/23/72, at Chicago, Illinois. At this 
convention it wno announced a demonstr^t'’ wmild Bp Vipld np’einst 
the American Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) in Chicago, 2/22/72, 
for the purpoffiof obtaining nev/s media coverage for the presidential 
YIP candidate. 

Enclosed for the Bureau are 13 copies of an LHM dated as above» 
and captioned, ’'Youth International Party (YIP) Sponsored Demonstra- 
tion Against American Broadcasting Corporation (ABC), Chicago, 
Illinois, 2/22/72," and "Demonstrations during the Democratic 
National Convention, July, 1972, Miami, Florida." Recipient 
offices are being furnished number of copies designated in copy 
count in view of their investigative interest. 

PJnclosed LHil is classified "Cjin5¥^^tial" as it contains informa- 
tion furnished by a confidential source of continuing value, the 
unauthorised disclosure of whose identity may compromise him, 
thereby possibly having an adverse effect upon the defense interests 
of the country. 


Enclosed LHM has been prepared by Milwaukee to apprise the 
Bureau and interested governmental agencies of all information 
ascertained by Milwaukee regarding the 2/22/72 demonstration 
against ABC. 


Source concealed in enclosed LHM as first source is 


is on the Mii;-7auRee Aciex. 


b7C 


Other individuals identified from the Milwaukee Division as having 
participated in the demon stration are subj ects of Milv?aukee security 


investiga,tions except for 


Kpb) . 


A rex'; security investigation is being initiated on this individual 
to effect his identity and to determine xvhether he represents a 
securit}'’ risk. 


Milwaukee xd-ll continue to folloxv YIP activists locally. 


2 




(This ling for LEFT MARGIN.) 


F B I 


0-<^. (Re> . 5-18-7 1) 


Transmit in 


f 


(Tvpe in plaintext or code) 


Via 


airtel 


C Priority) 

Date 2/ 29/72 


To: SAC, Albany 


. \i 

V 


# 


iN/ii L.AUL.UO JrULXilOAL OUINVUJNXXUIN 

3/10-12/72, WEST SIDE HIGH SCHOOL 
GARY, INDIANA 

MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION CONCERNING 
(EXTREMIST INTELLIGENCE SECTION) 


rom: Director, FBI 


Captioned convention is being held to identify and ratify 
the national black political agenda for 1972 and, secondly, to crystal^, 
strategies on maximvim practical xonity in national participation of 
blacks in Democratic and Republican national conventions as well as in 
local, state and national elections. 

Attending will be 2,000 delegates selected at large from 
throughout U.S., including young people, women, commvinity organizers, 
commixnity activists and black nationalists. In addition, 2,000 electe 
black officials from throughout the country, including the U.S. House 
of Representatives* Black Caucus, are expected to attend. Representa- 
tives have also been invited from national civil rights groups, 
commimity- oriented organizations and black nationalist organizations, 
including National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, 
Urban League and Southern Christian Leadership Conference. 


of the Congress of African Peoples, 

and other officers of this group may be in attendance as well as 
Bobby Seale, Chairman of Black Panther Party. 

This convention will be afforded extensive coverage by news 
media and such coverage can be expected to cover activities of any 


.ze 


(Do not type below this line.) 


2 .- All Offices 






bo 

b7C 







Airtel to Albany 

Re: National Black Caucus Political Convention 

3/10-12/72, West Side High School 
Gary, Indiana 


active black extremist participants. For this reason and to avoid 
any charge Bureau is investigating legitimate political activities, 
the Bureau wants it clearly understood no investigation should be 
conducted concerning the convention. Likewise, no informants should 
be directed to attend convention. 

Indianapolis Division will be primarily responsible for 
monitoring news media coverage and advising Bureau of those items 
which will be of interest to the Bureau. 

Any information obtained concerning black extremism at or 
travel of black extremists to this convention should be forwarded to 
the Bureau and Indianapolis in form suitable for dissemination xmder 
appropriate captions; however, no dissemination should be made locally. 

All offices should remain aware of any planned activities to 
disrupt this convention which may involve Federal violations and insure 
that the Bureau is advised expeditiously upon development of such data. 


2 






The candidates themselves will (,e staying at: 
AMERICANA HOTEL _ 


carillon hotel 

DEAUVILLE HOTEL 

I 

Di L 1 DO 

DORAL (OCEAN) 
DUPONT 

Montmartre 


Muskie (Maine)'"'^ 

Vorty (California) 

McCarthy (Minnesota) 

Humphrey (Minnesota) 

Chisolm (New York) 

Mills (Arkansas) 

■ Peabody (Mass, for Vice Pres, only) 
Hartk^- (Indiana) 

Lindsl'^y (New York) 

McGovern (s. Dakota) 

Wallace (Alabama) 

Jackson (Washington, D.C.) 




to-n 


8EARCHED...«__JN0B(ED J 

SERIALIZED FILED ! 

MARS 1972 

FBI— MIAMI 



J 





FD-3SQ (Rev. 7-16-63) 


(Mount Clipping in Space Below) 


(Indicate page, name of 
newspaper, city and state.) 


San Diego may be lagging in 
Its payments toward the 1972 Re- 
publican National Convention, but 
Democratic Party officials say 
Florida money is rolling in on, 
schedule for' jbeir July g-lS' con- 
clave in Miami Beach. 

Andy Shea. assistant to-Robert 
Strauss, the party^s national trea- 
surer, said Democrats are “very 
well satisfied" with' Florida' fund 
raising.efforts. 


HE SAID local pledges of 
about ’$950;000 in cash, goods and , 
(Services are being fulfilled satil- 


i Earlier,” it was disclosed th|t 
n Diego, , the host city for tlfe; 
Republicans’ convention in Au- 
gust, Is $300,000 behind in payr- 
ments to the party. Party officials 
said that only $106;000 In cash 
has been paid by the Sari Diego 
Conventionnnd Visitors Bureau. 

A $200,000 payment due Jan. i 
has not been received, and a filial 
payment of $200,000 is due April 
1 . 

Shea said, however, that the 
Democratic coffers are being filled 
to the tune of; 

$250j000 from the Tourist 
D^Pelopment Authority — th,« 
ian ;est single cash donation. O ^ 

thi 5, $100,000 due in January hat ; 
been paid. The TDA budgeted the 
otlier $150)000 over the next three 
years, but it lias sent a promissory 
note to the party, and the party is 
selling, the note "to a financial -in? 
stitution for a discount’* 

The party will end up with 
something less than $250)000, tlie 
TDA will pay the rest of tha 
money to^wdsataver institution 
purchases the note. 


mg committee organized by Gov. 
Reubin Askew, the money coming 
mostly from, large corporations 
ind businessmen. A check for thiji 
amount was handed to party offj. 
cials when tlfe^Convewo’n coni ; 
tract was signed last Sept. 10 i| 1 
'Miami Beach, 

# An estimated - -.$100;000 
from -Beach hotels. Shea said that 
by agreement with the hotels, the- 
• party’s housing committee,ls han- 
dling room reservations fbr the 
convention and is collecting $i 
peyroom for each night from the- 
$5Q-a-room deposits that are being 
mailed to party" headquarters in 
Washington. ' 

Shea said the total should 
reach '$100')000 and might exceed 
it. ■ ■ , 

[: THE BA=LAN:CE. about; 
j $50Qi()00 , is “very hard to eval^ 
ate," Shea- said. It comes in fS 
norm of goods and services, ha|- 
from the City-of Miami Beach and 
the other half from Metro arid 
Dade'Cnd Broward municipalities. 

Shea said the services will in- 
clude such things as construction.' 
w’itbin the Convention Hall, shut- 
tle bus service and off-duty police- 
men, and he anticipates no hitches 
in the pledges’ beihg fulfilled. 

Another $25,000 had been 
pledged by the Florida Democratic 
Party, but Shea said state party 
officials "have decided instead to 
supply a local staff to coordinate, 
convention preparations, "so 
we!re well sStisfrear'’ 


eubiii Askew 

- . . organised drive 


Miami herald 


MIAMI, FL(DRIDA 


Date: 3/3/72 


Title: DEMOCRATIC 
NATIONAL CONVENTION 

I 

Character: 

or 

Classification; 80-1353 
Submitting Office: MIAMI , FLA. 

I I Being Investigated 










(This line for LEFT MARGIN.) 


F B I 




Transmit in Via Airtel — 

(Type in plaintext or code) (Priority) 


To; SAC, Miami (80-1353) Date 3 / 2 /7 2 

i'-'''^rom: Director, FBI 

MIDEM 


Reurairtel 2/25/72. 

By return airtel and letterhead memorandum, submit the 
information contained in referenced airtel so that it may be 
disseminated to appropriate agencies at the Seat of Government. 

For your future guidance, pertinent information developed 
concerning demonstrations during the Democratic National Convention 
should be incorporated into letterhead memoranda captioned "Demon- 
strations During the Democratic National Convention, Miami, 
Florida." These memoranda may be submitted by cover airtel 
captioned "MIDEM," Of course, information developed requiring more 
expeditious dissemination should be submitted to the Bureau by 
teletype under the above "MIDEM" caption. 

You should promptly review your file on this matter to 
assure that all pertinent information developed to date has been 
submitted to the Bureau in a form suitable for dissemination. 






Transmit the following in 
Via 


Date: 

CODE 


3/2/72 


(Type in plaintext or code) 

NITEL 


(Priority) 



TO: 


DIRECTOR 

ATTENTION: DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE DIVISION 


FROM: MIAMI (80-1353) 

DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION, MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA. 
JULY TENTH - FOURTEENTH, SEVENTYTIVO. 

ON MARCH SECOND, SEVENTYTWO, CAPTAIN 


AND 


r ARE: 


L 



L 



L. 


DESCRIBED HERSELF AS 



ADVISED 


OF THE CRS. CAPTAIN I 
THAT HE AND CHIEF POMERANCE HAVE PREVIOUSLY BEEN CONTACTED 

BUT THIS IS THE FIRST TIME 


BY 


THEY HAVE MET 




STATED THEIR GROUP 


^"i-RUN CRISES PREVENTION AND CRISSS RELATIONS. THE GROUP 


9^ 


CLAIMS TO HAVE CONSIDERS^LEnEXPFRIENi 

ViOiv* 


- 0 - 


^ [[ly- Miami 
JPM/dk 

Approved: (aJ. 



Speciay^ent in Charge 



RKING WITH 


Per 


INTELLIGENCE UNIT, MIAMI BEACH POLICE DEPARTMENT, ADVISED 
THAT ON MARCH FIRST, HE AND CHIEF OF POLICE ROCKY POMERANCE, 
WHO IS FLORIDA DIRECTOR OF SECURITY FOR THE DEMOCRATIC 
NATIONAL CONVENTION, HAD A CONFERENCE NlTH FOUR INDIVIDUALS 
WHO STATED THEY WERE FROM^ E COMMU^Y RELATIONS SERVICES 
OF THE U. S. department OF/JUSTICE,'^ WASHING'!t)N, D.C. 


■b6 

b7C 



U. S. GOVEg«MENT POINTING OFFICE; 1971 -4I3-I3S 

Fo'/^s 3 '-/oa 




FD-S6 (Rev. 5-22-64) 





F B I 
Date: 


Transmit the following in 
Via 


(Type in plaintext or code) 


(Priority) 


-L. 


80-1353 
PAGE TWO 


STATED 


BLACKS, PUERTO RICANS, AND CHICANOS . 

THEY MIGHT BE ABLE TO ASSIST THE CHIEF OF POLICE IN THEIR 
RELATIONS WITH THE MEDIA, AND VIA ’’PIPELINES" TO 
MINORITY GROUPS. 

IMiifeiED THE ORGANIZATION HAS NUMEROUS 


COMPETENT FIELD REPRESENTATIVES THAT COULD BE OF ASSISTANCE. 

STATED HE WORKS OUT OF WASHINGTON, D.C., 


AND CAN BE CONTACTED AT WASHINGTON TELEPHONE NUMBER 


CAN BE CONTACTED IN ATLANTA, GEORGIA, 


AT TELEPHONE NUMBER 


CAPTAIN 


STATED THAT CHIEF POMERANCE IS 
INTERESTED IN DETERMINING IF THESE INDIVIDUALS ARE 
LEGITIMATE REPRESENTATIVES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE. 
HE STATED THAT THEY SEEM COMPLETELY COOPERATIVE AND 


Approved: 


Sent 


M Per 


bo 

b7C 


Special Agent in Charge 


U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1971 —413 — 135 




F B I 


FD-S6 (Rev. S-22-64) 


Transmit the following in 


Date; 


(Type in plaintext or code) 


(Priority) 


MM 80-1353 


PAGE THREE 


FRIENDLY, BUT HAVE NOT DEMONSTRATED ANY CREDENTIALS WHEN 


ASmV<AND HAVE NO CALLING CARD. HE ADDED THAT ON 




RCH FIRST, 


HAD TO ASK 


FIRST 


NAME, WHICH APPEARED TO BE UNUSUAL, SINCE THEY ARE SUPPOSED 
TO BE FAIRLY WELL ACQUAINTED. 

<8uREAU is REQUESTED TO CONTACT DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 
TO ASCERTAIN IF ABOVE INDIVIDUALS ARE MEMBERS OF THIS 
DEPARTMENT, AND IF ANY CONTACT BY THEM WITH THIS OFFICE 
CAN BE ANTICIPATED. 



Z /^/12 


AIRTEL 


AIRI'IAIL 


/ 


TO: 

FROK; 
SUBJECT : 


SAC, Ti>fflPA 

SAC, JACKSONVILLE (100-2 OS 3) 

FLORIDA PEOPLE *S COALITION 
SM - HL 



Re Ja<5ksonville airtel to Tampa dated 3/3/72 and 
captioned "MIDEM." ; 5 

E nclosed herewith for Tampa are materials 

obtained bv I , 


For information of Miami, material includes a 
tentative schedule for speeches at various state universities 
concerning proposed demonstrations during the Democratic 
National Convention to be held in Miami in July of this year. 
Included on the list of speeches are the following: 


Thursday, March 9 - Sarasota - New College — Fort Myers? 

Ibrt Lauderdale - Broward Junior College 


Friday, March 10 - Miami - University of Miami and Miami 

Dade Junior College 


Speakers are expected to include one or more 
of the following: 


and ]itember& of the Florida People *s Coalition 


2 - Taapa 
(2)- Miami (Info) 

6 - Jacksonville (100-2053) 
(1 - 100-1943) 

RGRxtch/ 

(9) 




cciy 



.b6 

:b7C 




I 




' BySAIMTJrACdBS 

, Hofald. staff Writer 

' Demonstrators- corning to 
Miami Beach, for the 1972 
Democratic Go'nVention July 
9-15 will have places 
reserved for them right in ' 

frPht of the convention hall. 

“We'll have two areas, one 
between 19 th, and 20th 
Streets aiid the other be- 
tween 18th and 19th, '■ Miami 
Beach „ Police Chief Rocky 
Pomerance, who is in charge 
■of security planning, said 
Monday. “One of our objecr 
fives was to accommodate 
opposing demonstrations 
that might occur at the same' 
time.” 

Pomerance said that keep- 
ing the demonstrators in 
specified areas- on the con- 
vention hall lawn would 
allow them to get their mes- 
sage across to delegates and 
network TV cameras without 
interfering with the conven- 
tion itself. 

BOTH POMERANCE and 
Gov. Reubin Askew, who 



(}n nationwide television 
I Sunday, said’ they -doubt tl e 
lOnVehtion will draw tli? 
;arge- number of protesteis 
That came to the 1968 con- 
ventidn in Chicago.. 

They^pointed out that the 
Democrats^ ..who, were in 
power in 1968„ are nowv.out 
of power. In addition, they 
said, the times seem, to jiave 
changed. 

‘T don’t really feel; that the 
Democratic convention may 
be subject to the same pres- 
sures that, the ^Republican 
convention would be subject 
to 'arid 1 think maybe the 
mood of the country is not 
completely the same,!'' Askew 
said on TV. 

But they both said it is 
necessary to .plan just in 
case. 

Pomerance said much of 
the emphasis this year is on 
training police officers to 
face problems that might be 
created by the presence of 
demonstrators. 

Pomerance said he has not. 
made direct contact with any 
groups that might he 
planning to come. But he 
said his men have been work-- 
ing with Operation Miami 
Snowplow, a group of local 
residents that has been in 
c 0 nta-c .dissident 

groups. . 


(Indicate page, name of 
newspaper, city and state.) 


MIAMI HERALD 


MIAMI, FLORIDA 


Date: 3/7/72 


Edition: 

Author: 


Title: democratic 
NATIONAL CON^/ENTION 


Character: 


Classification: 80-1353 
Submitting Office: MIAMI, FLA, 

I { Being Investigated 




marY 

LJ 




3/7/72 



AIRTEL 


OX) 8 DIRECTOR, FBI 

FROM8 SAC, MIAIII (80-1353) 

SUBJECT* MIDEt-1 


Re Miami airtel to the Bxiteau, 2/25/72; and Bureau 
airtei to I-liami, 3/2/72, instructing that Miami incorporate 
its information in an l^. 


For the infoarraation of the Bureau, 
v;ho reportedly received this information from an 
"informant” , is an individual of doubtful credibility whose 
information appears to be high ly exagger ated and possibly 
false. During past contacts by ] | with Agents of the 

Miami Office concerning criminal matters, he had been found 
to be frequently imreliable aid information furn ifed bv Vtiin 
has been selfsarvina. .He has been described by 


as erratic and unreliable. 


■b6 

b7C 

■b7D 



In view of reputation, it is felt any 

information furnished by him should be verified through contact 
with his original source prior to dissem ination, a nd UACB, 

Miami will await results of interview of | b ^ior to 

incorporating this information in a form 
dissemination . 


2 - Bureau (RM) 

1 ~ Columbia (3hgo) 


^ - ^ami 
IRM) f^JGB; snmm 




b7D 










3/13/72 


com 


TELirifl® 


miTM* 


TO DZSUISCTOR# FBI U76-1410) (100-44331B) C105-I3I719) 
cBxamo U76«-s sob c) 

SAC# mf irORK UeO-157178) 

me, mmimsrm wmw uoo- 471723 (iOAVis) 

FE€M SAC# HXAMI (174-3) (») 


mviD ttrs akai bt al (tbavei. or 










JSRRY ItUBZS 

pcmm <mmnc or hm viauaxcHB twa arose mm 

ACTXvzTzss EKnaaa the i^aMocRjffic hatzobmi coHVEnrxcsi hkli> m 

CHICASO* XU»XCfOI8« XM AUGUST, SZXrT-BXG^* PEHDXRG AN 
APPEAL TREY HERB RELBASSO ON BONO. 

THE JOANZ XJBSRATZON FRONT IS A CQALZTIOS THAT SHARE 
A CONHQN WmSJTl&B TO R&SCISH, SSXXm ASO ZliPBRZAl<Z^. 


THE COALXTZON IS ORt^IEBO AROUKD THE OmmaUS THAT THERE 








lat X76<»3 

msfs B£ oooRDisiATSD jW}ii»v3xauQff owv<mjsio» ABD ocmFSi(xesiiisx<m 
TO THE mmcsiKSic (xmmstsios to i»s bsi4> gb MZAia muhC &0 


jm»t0 BSfnaxnMtuo 






DEMOCRATIC .NVENTION PLANNING SUMMARY /altfflRCH 3> T972 
OLD BUSINESS REQUIRED ACTION OR ACT 
1. Security for public utilities. Planning staff request 


Procedures for mass arrests, 
identifying prisoners, etc. 


3. Transporting, holding and booking 
in event of mass arrests. 


4. Arrest powers for Miami officers 
assigned to Miami Beach. 


5. Manpower assistance, missions, etc, 


6. Acceptable area for cam.psites and 
forum sites 


7. Supportive legislation. Ordinance 
package , 


NEW BUSINESS 

1. Delegate and candidate housing. 


Convention private security agency 
selected by Democratic Party. 




Planning staff requested to contact 
utilities people in their own 
jurisdiction. Encourage them to 
hire private security where feasibl 


Definite need fni^ some .documenta- 

tion. Chief ! jhas proven 

bookino for ms to b e reviewe d by 

Major I to 

explore use of video tape with 
Miami and DPS representatives. 


Chief Sandstrum accepted this as 
County function. DPS will develop 
procedures, research available 
equipment and make recommendations 
to include juveniles. 


Majors 


Dr. I I Majors ! l and I 

I to explore! A I I concurred I 

arrest power should be available. ^ I 

Being identified and evaluated. 
Should be determined prior to 
March 23rd. Beverage people request 
to start early. Need anticipated 
for women and black personnel. 

Still undetermined. Is a County-widi 
problem. County Manager and Directo' 
Purdy giving it consideration as 
a pol i cy matter. 

l and Major to put 

together Ordinance "Package" . State 
laws should be utilized. 


Chief Pomerance distributed and 
reviewed lists of anticipated hotels 
to be used. Pointed out need for 
security coordination with Secret 
Service. Hotels located in County 
and Miami as well as Miami Beach. 


~/07 

] avrarded contrac 



|to be invited to 

attend 

i , FILED, 

r\ !z wz ' 





tS xW 
imt ^mU} 


CM«S3s ^ttmt ais^ U^i 4ataS 2/Z4/f2^ 

csa $/B /720 Ca 2 »fe* I I sead^ 

S^gsasftiasttfe oifi^asr ,itt «ha*rsf# of seoaritjf .aatti 
associate san-rsefecjr of tlje 3.972 Be»K3ca?«feio Sati®3did. Coa- 
vmt^on^ timt m ra^easeatmtivaif of fipj- oitliBr fcm 

nm Bm ¥<53rk i^raacli or oiOier Ijraacij# HaS tmm. in 
coataofe witli officials ki t3«i mm 

ffetat m aagotistioi^ aro »» SJSPXB 

aeEtivi.tS.os o«ria^ ttio 1972 Beaacratio ilafciot^ 

jta ziiaai* 


2 isyroau ircii 

a i:ai#¥o 3 ^ 

a « Cl - loa*4497§H'^)Cl^'i| 

11 •*» 

f 2 i* illaiai 



f C'/ 3 s 3 ' /dP’ 



OPTIONAL FORM NO. 10 
M«r loea Eis^ion 

GSA FPMR (<l CFr) 101-II.S 


UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

Memorandum 

SAC, Miami (80-1353) 


date: 3/8/72 


Director, FBI 


subject: MIDEM 


Reurtel 2/28/72, and teletype 3/2/72, captioned 
"Midem" and "Democratic National Convention, Miami, 
Florida, 7/10-14/72," respectively. 

Enclosed herewith for your information is one 
copy each of eight documents relating to the origin, 
responsibility and structure of the Community Relations 
Service . 

Also for your information,! 

is Chief, Special Projects Section of this Service and 
is headquartered in Washington. D. C. It i s probable that 

are regional 

representatives of this Service and operate out of the 
Atlanta Office. 

With respect to the identification of these 
individuals by Chief Pomerance, this is a routine matter 
which should be resolved by the Chief by requiring them 
to identify themselves prior to conducting any discussions 
with them. 


held by 


^d advise Chief Pomerance of the position 


With regard to the Bureau’s relations in the 
past with the Community Re3,ations Service, there have been 
only limited contacts since its inception. These contacts 
have been cordial. 


Enclosure 


searched INDEXED ‘ 

■^ERIALiZEp^^FILfD J 



Buy U.S. Savings Bonds Kegularly on the Payroll Savings Plan^ 



Cov^Jr ShcGt for Informant Report or a! 

FD-C015 mcv. 9-30-G9) 


TO'S SACj MILWAUKEE (1 00-1 935^) 
subject: yip PRE-COiTPBR®ICB 1/7-9/72, 
at MADISOH, WISCONSIN 


Date received 


Received from (name or symbol number) 


Method of delivery (check appropriate blocks) 



I u\.\ lu ptJiSsm 


Uj' 


I I ^ 5 ' 


If orally furnislted and reduced to writing by Agent: 
Dale 


Dictated 


Transcribed 

Authenticated 

by Informant 


Brief description of activity or material 


Inf o e c apt 1 one d conference 


j ri^olUr I t recordinp device 


Date of Report 


OC i written by Informant 




Rile where original is located ifnotattached 


* INDIVIDUALS DESIGNATED BY AN ASTERISK (*) ONLY ATTENDED A MEETING AND DID NOT ACTIVELY PARTICIPATE. 
VIOLENCE OR REVOLUTIONARY ACTIVITIES WERE NOT DISCUSSED. 

I I Information recorded on a card index by on date 


Reraaiirstj^ XjfM has been prepared by Milwaukee regarding this conference, 


1 -1 00- 
1 - 100 - 

2 - Boston (RM) 

1 —1 00 — 

1 -1 00« 

2 •= Denver {RM) 

1 - 1 00 - 
1 —1 00— 

3 - Detroit (R>I) 

1 —1 00— 

1 -1 00 - 

3 1 —1 00“ 

- Miami (RM) 

1 —1 00 “ 

A ,^1 00 - 


(Youth International Parijr) 

(YIP Pre -Conference 1/7-9/72, at Madison, Wisconsin) 
(Youth International Party) 

(YIP Pre-Conference 1/7-9/72, at Pladison, Wisconsin) 
(Youth International Party) 

(YIP Ere -Conference 1/7-9/72, at Madison, Wisconsin) 
(Youth International Party) 

(YIP Pre “Conference 1/7-9/72, at Madison, Wisconsin) 
(John Sinclair) 

(Youth International Party) 

(YIP Pre-Conference 1/7-9/72, at Madison, Wisconsin) 
(Demonstrations During the Portheoming Political 

■ Campaigns ) Block stamp 


Copies continued on next 






SEARCHED INCSXED 

SER|AyZEO„.^_Fll r 

MARI 0 19/4 











Copies ( Oont » ) 


2 


2 


- Philadelphia (RM) 

(Youth International Party) 
1-nOO- (YIP Pre-Conference 1/7 “9/72, 

Wisconsin) 


- Pittsburgh (RM) 

1~100~ (Youth International Party) 

1-100- (YIP Pre -Conference 1/7-9/72, 

Wisconsin ) 


at Madison, 


at Madison. 


7 - New York (RM) 
1 -1 00 - 
1 -1 00 - 


1 -1 00 - 
1 -1 00 - 
1 —1 00 — 

1 — 1 00 — 
1-1 00 - 
4 - wo (RM) 
1 -1 00 - 
1 -1 00 - 


1 - 1 00 - 
1 -1 00 - 

1.3” Milwaukee 
1-100-19355 
1 - 1 00 - 1 3948 
1 - 1 00-1 6644 
1 -1 00-1 8949 


1 -1 00-1 6557 
1-100-18706 
1 -1 00-1 5547 
1 -1 00-1 71 02 
1 -1 00-1 7687 
1 -1 00-1 5922 
1 -1 00-1 6759 

1 e .1 00^1 


(Youth International Party) 

(YIP Pre -Conference 1/7-9/72, at Madison. 
Wisconsin) 

(Underground Press Syndicate) 

(Tom Foroade' 

( Jerry Rubin 
(Abbott Hoffman) 

(Youth International Party) 

(YIP Pre-Confei*ence 1/7-9/72, at Madison 
Wisconsin) 

(Underground Press Syndicate) 

(Tom Porcade ) 


(YIP, Madison) 

(YIP, Milwaukee) 
(Demonstrations during 
Poll ti cal. Camnaig ns ) 


(Take-Over) 


the Forthcoming 


be 

b7C 

b7D 



Cover Sheet for Informant Repor* or Mj^|L .1 

r<'D-30<". Uftn-. 9-30-69) 


TO; SAG, MILWA'OISE (100-19355) 
S-D1,\JECT: yip PRP]-C0NPEREITCS 1/7-9/72, 
at MADISOIT, PJISCOlTSIl'T 


Date prepared 


Date received 


Received from (name or symbol number) 




el i very (chock appropriate blocks) 


I I folontirme I ! hv mail ’ I Orallv 


if orally furnished and reduced lo writing by Agent: 
Date 


I I recording device | | witten by Informant 


Date of Report 


Dictated 


Date(s) of activity 


Transcribed 

Authenticated 

by Informant 


Brief description of activity or material 


Press release regarding Madison conference, 


File where originalis located ifnotattached 


* INDIVIDUALS DESIGNATED BY AN ASTERISK (*) ONLY ATTENDED A MEETING AND DID NOT ACTIVELY PARTICIPATE. 
VIOLENCE OR REVOLUTIONARY ACTIVITIES WERE NOT DISCUSSED. 

I I Information recorded on a card index by on date . 


Remarks: An LHM has been submitted by Milwaukee regarding this conference o 


1~100~ (Robert Hints) 

^..1^(00- (Youth International Party) 

1-1 00“ (YIP Pre-Conf ernce 1/7-9/72, at Madison, Wisconsin) 

^^^100- (Deraonstrations During the Forthcoming Political 

Gatapaigns ) 

- New York (RM) 

1-100- (Youth Interna-tion Party) 

1-100“ (YIP Pre -Conference 1/7-9/72, at Madison, Wisconsin) 

1-100- (Jerry Rubin) 

1 00- (A.bbott Hoffman) 

- San Diego (RM) 


1 —1 00" 

1 -1 00 - 
1 "100“ 

1 —1 00— 

- W-0 (RM) 

1 -1 00 - 

1 —1 00 — 

- Milwaukee 
1 - 100-19355 

-■ 1-100-15948 
1 “1 00-1 6644 


(Youth International Party) 

(YIP Pre "Conference 1/7-9/72, at Madison, Wisconsin) 
(Demonstrations During the Forthcoming Political 
Campaigns ) 

( Calrep ) l^ck stamp 




(Youth International Party' 
(YIP Pre-Conference 1/7-9/72, 
at Madison, Wisconsin) 

1 -100-18949 

, I 

TWjjp 

( 20 ) 












ijaGDSf 






-I 

eO y < ‘'a 


ji^cn 




30IP 


TO ALL I'lEMBERS OP THE PIIESS: 

A secrei. national planning conference in Madison, V^is,, eon- 
. eluded last evening. The meeting was attended by over 40 delegates 
from chapters of Yippies and the newly-formed Zippies (a hand of 
Yixjpie renegades) from around the country, as A^ell as a special 
envoy from the city of, Miami, ilobert Hintz. 

The meeting was held bo plan massive ZIPed up YIP aebions in 
conjunction with the '72 elections. In Chicago '68 we exposed the 
government! in Miami '72 we will expose ourselves — and our al- 
ternative culture. 

The sceiiario of events j 

March 18-26 — Spring Preek Week. Statewide meetings of- YIP 
and ZIP chapter.s in 50 states to get high and raise legions of 
young xjeople for '72. Also colossal YIP-ZIP voter registi’ation 

i 

drive to put a freek in office today. Hang a jury real soon. 



May 1 — Hay Day is J-Day. Reefer smoke-iris in every state 
Capitol, followed by marches to the prisons. Light up a joint on 
May Day, Free Dana Deal. Free almost everybody. 

May 1-2 — S]iring Plant-In, Plant seeds — lower prices. 

Buy American, 

July 1-3 — National Tribal Congress in Washington, D,C, An 
assembly of tribes of the Free Nation, 

July 4 — Third annual reefer smoke-in at the Washington Mon- 
ument and anti-ClA/heroin march to the steps of the U.S, Capitol, 
The traditional cross-country toke-down and junk stomp as per usu- 
al , 

July 26 •— Che Guevara Appreciation Day. Appreciation of the 
Cuban struggle for liberation. Miami Beach. 

July 27-31 — Zippie Party Freek Circus — Alternate Culture 
Convention in Miami. Zip-off Miami in *72. An assembly of young 
voters to boycott the ’72 elections unless our demands are met. 
Fifty million young voters are declaring, ”A plague on both your 
houses," This will be a four-day party that will make the Shah of 
Iran's look like a brunch. 

Aug, 1—20 — Gi'apes of Wrath caravan to California. Junked 
busses, stolen motorcycles, bathtubs on wheels, bicycles, ZIPelins, 
dune-buggies, I'oller skates and the Boraxo 20-mule team will head 
into the sunset for High Noon in San Diego. 

Aug. 21-24 — San Diego; smoke grass and kick ass; we've got 
Dick Nixon to kick around again, lippie-ti-yi-yo-yi-yay , 



The Youth International Party has been completely reorganized 
for '72. Abbie Hoffman and Jerry Bubin have removed themselves as 
leaders. Hoffman is in self-imposed exile in the Virgin Islands, 
and Jerry is no longer into the party. Like Jerr5'- always said, 
"Never trust anyone over 30." 

In '72, YIP and ZIP represents and speaks for all the people 
— not just fx'eeks, not just youths. In ' 12 , we’re for the human 
beingo 

Every state will bring a rock to Miami, and two rocks will 
be chosen as the YIP— ZIP "slate" for office. Get yer rocks off 
in '72; our candidate will be too stoned to know. Ve're going to 
show that the youth vote can't be taken for granite; we're gonna 
rock the boat in '72. ¥e want to catapult our rock into the Vhite 
House. Hake '72 one big rock festival. Cast your vote with the 
roclt. 

In '72 youth will take control of their own lives. The youth 
vote will not be manipulated or delivered to any candidate who 
doesn't support the demands made by youth as a power group, ¥e 
have a simple one—point program — Unconditional surrender of the 
U.S, government. U.S, out of America now. 

ZIPPIEI 
Box 706 

Madison, V/is. 53701 
(608) 251-6401 


f 



Cover Sheet for informant Report or I 

FD-.:06 (Rov. 9-30-69) 


toj sag, milwagebs { 100 - 15948 ) 

SUBJECT;? YOUTH BTTERHATIOHAL PARTY 
^ mUISON, WISCONSIN 


Date prepared 


Date received 


Received from (name or symbol number) 


el i very (check appropriate blocks) 

L. pcicct* i i by tclcph^"'' ! I'' 


If orally furnished and reduced to tvriUng by Agent: 
Date 


Received by 


sj 




i orally I I recording device [2] written by Informant 


Date of Report 


Dictated 


Date(s) o 


Transcribed _ 

Authenticated 
bylnfonnant _ 


Td< 


11 


convention, 


File where original is located ifnotatlached 


* INDIVIDUALS DESIGNATED BY AN ASTERISK («) ONLY ATTENDED A MEETING AND DID NOT ACTIVELY PARTICIPATE. 
VIOLENCE OR REVOLUTIONARY ACTIVITIES WERE NOT DISCUSSED. 

I I Information recorded on a card index by on date , 


Remarks: been prepared by Mil waukee regarding this conve ntion o 

6 ”• Chicago (RlO ^ ^ ^ ~ ^ 

1 ~1 00“ (Youth International Party ) 


1 “1 00 “ 

1 “1 00 “ 

1 “1 00 “ 

1 “1 00 “ 

1 “1 00 -^ 

1 "1 00 “ 
Miami RM) 
4“1 00 “ 
tM00“ 


Springfield (RM) 

1 ~ 100 » (• 

■ WPG (RM) 

1 -1 00 “ (■ 

• Milwaukee 

1 - 1 00-15948 

1 “1 00“being opened 

1 “1 oo=>i 6644 
1 - 100-1 7420 
1 “ 1 00-1 6557 
1 “1 oof“i 7598 

■ 1 - 1 00 -T 5922 
1 “lnn^iRqjiQ 

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(Chicago SEED) 

-b 7 D 

(Youth International Party) 

(Demonstrations During the Forthcoming Political 
Campaigns ) 


(Youth International Party) 
(Youth International Party) 



LNU) 


Block Stamp 


SEARCHED INDEXED...... 

SER|AL|2E0.^_.FILf0^_ 

MAR101972 
















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optional form no* 10 
MAY 1062 EDITION 
6SAFPMR(41 CFR) 101-11.6 

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

Memorandum 




TO : 

sac, <100-15700) 

date: 3/VO/lZ 

FK.OM • 

sa 



be 

subject: 




b7C 


Tim mom 

IS ^ mST 




advisea that the Mami 


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Idberatioa actively working with Bsw left activists 

in Greater Hioniy is the local affiliate of tlio riorida 
3?eoples Platform Ooaliticai and has mda plans for the Beinocratic 
national Cotmm.tS. 0 n* 


.according to the scarce, the liiaiai Idfoeraticm Sfeont 
is a local coalition of studonts, wocaea, and young workers 
who share in a cscrrKion opposition to racisa, sesdlsaa, and 
inpsrialisa- Ihis coalition is organised around tlie consensus 
that there mast he coordinated non-violent opposition 
and confrontation to the Poaocratic eonventlon to held on 
iliami Beach during July 1972- In the ceding weelcs tlie Hljp 
tfill inset with other groups and indivi^kials with the goal of 
forming a hroad base coalition to insure that an effective, 
authentic, alternative voice will be heard by the Democrats 
and the rest of the w^3^_this i3^y* 


1 - 10Q-1S7Q 
1 ’ 



GO-1353 i5iaia4 
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5010 - 106-02 


Buy U.S. Savings Bonds Kegularly on the Payroll Savings Plan 




AWARENESS SEMINAR 

Religious and Community Leaders Concerned with the Democratic National Convention 

Joan I. Gross, Chairman 


Date Wednesday, March 8, 1972 

Time 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 

Place Miami Beach Convention Hall 

Veterans Room 


Morning Session 


9:00 Registration and Coffee 

9:;30 Invocation and Introductions- Dr. Harold Buell and Miss Joan I. Gross 

^ Statement of Religious Leaders Concerned - Rabbi Solomon Schi ff — 

Address - Dr. Edward T. Graham, Member Fla. Host Committee for the 
j ' ~ Democratic Convention 

10:00 Panel Discussion - Chief Rocky Pomerance - Miami Beach 

! Chief Bernard Garmire - City of Miami 

I Wilson Purdy-Dir. Public Safety, Dade County 

George O’Connor, Chairman 

! General Discussion and Exchange between Panielists and Audience 


12:15 


A Look at the Convention - 


Buffet Luncheon 


Mr. Richard Murphy, Chairman Democratic 
National Convention Committee 
Rev. Jose Reyes, Presiding 


Afternoon Session 


Report of the Chapel Committee- Canon Theodore Gibson 


Community Responsibility- 


Area Group Meetings 


Mr. Wesley Pomeroy, Dir. of Safety and 
Development of the University of M in nesota 
Mr. Ed Souci, Presiding 

To discuss the Miami Response to the 
Democratic Convention 


Conveners: 

Rev. Lloyd Knox - Southwest 
Rev. Irving Elligah - Northwest 
Rabbi Solomon Schiff - Miami Beach 

Mr . Frank Magrath - Southeast 


Report Back of Area Groups - Rev. Jack Cas sidy. Presiding 


Closing Address - 


Mr. Wesley Pomeroy 
Miss Joan Gross, Presiding 


Adjournment 

Registration fee $5.00 - includes lunch, coffee and general expenses 


Cover Sheet for Informant Report orl^li'rial 
FD-306 (Rev. 0-30-69) 



Dale received 


Receivcd/from (name or symbol number) 




ethod of delivery (ch^ck appropriate blocks) 

Uj^Lin person | 1 bv telenhone | | by moil j^^crcUy | | rccoidiua duvioe | | written by Inlormant 


If orally furnished and reduced to writing by Agent: 
Date 


Date of Report 


Dictated 


ateis) 01 activity 


Transcribed . 

Authenticated 
by Informant _ 





File where original is located ifnot attached 



ALS DEiTGNATED BY AN ASTERISK (*) ONLY ATTENDED A MEETING AND DID NOT ACTIVELY PARTICIPATE. 
VIOLENCE OR REVOLUTIONARY ACTIVITIES WERE NOT DISCUSSED. 

I I Information recorded on a card index by on date . 


Ah oou(9ce 

>42v/i /^/r/r?/>sT C/^un'^A/ Ma^r 


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81972 



Block stamp 


S£A7?6«m... INDEXED_.Si^£ 

SER(ALlZrois^..JlL£i)<:::L 

Ma£^972 

FBJ.^"JACKSaNViLLE 










'I 


FD-342 (Rev. 


1-26-65^) 




United S^otes Department of Justice 
Federal Bureau of Investigation 


Miami ^ Florida 
March 15, 1972 




1 — U* S. Secret; Service, Miami 


RS: DEMOCRATIC CONVEKTION 


Dear Sir: 


For your information, I am enclosing communications 
which may be of interest to you. 

Very truly yours, 


KENNETH W. WHITTAKER 

Special Agent in Charge 


Enc. (IXJIM) 



(Upon removal of classified enclosures, if any, this transmittal form becomes 
UNCLASSIFIED.) 



In R^ly, Phase Refer to 
FUeNo. 


DECLASSIFI 

FBI ATJTOliA 
DATE OZ -13 



H AUTHORITY DERIVED FROM: 
CLASSIFICATION GUIDE 


CONFISjg^lAL 

UNtTED STAT^ES DeJSSSt OF JUSTICE 

i'KiiERAL bureau of INVfeSTIGATION 
r 

Tampa, Florida 
March 9 , 1972 


FLORIDA PM)PLES PLATFORM COALITION 
(FPPC) 


. , speaking at a meeting of "Operation 

Snowplow*^ on U'ebruary 10,. 1972 at the Center for Dialogue, 
Miami, Florida, advised that the tentative plan was to 
establish a Florida state~wide coalition sometime in 
February, 1972 in Tampa, Florida. Th£_cQaJ1^4^ would 
then establish a state~wide network, I would 

act as the coordinator. Meetings would be held to dis- 
cuss a political — n1 at-fj orm with the organizations within 


C£ 

the coalition, 
is tc be established 


stated the state-wide coalition 
as a political pressure group, 

TP T-l 


I 


iuunu guilty 01 anti-ui 6 t 


law violations that arose from activities 
during the Democratic National Convention 
at Chicago, Illinois, in August, 1968. 
Pending >an appeal, he was released on 
bond by the U. S. Covert of Appeals, 
Chicago, Illinois, 


"Operation Snowplow" 
Center for Dialogue 
Miami, Flor-ida 


"Operation Snowplow" is a non-political 
coalition of Miami organizations whose 
purpose is to provide food, shelter, and 
medical services to non-delegate youth 
groups who will come to Miami for the 
Democratic National Convention. 


TP T-l 



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NFIDENTIAK^<^ 

rii^rfTii 


Excluded f^pef^^^omatic 
downgradin^^^^nd decla^sif icatio 


i SEARCHED iNDEXfO....^^ 

1 SERIALIZED^.. Ell ‘ , 

MAR 13 1972 / 








FLORIDA PEDPLES PLATFORM COALITION (FPPC) 


was a member of the Y®uth latcrpatioaai 
Party (YIP) , presient of the Student 
Mobilization Committee (SMC) ° USF, and 
secretary of the Radical Action 
Coalition (RAC). 


TP T^2 


The Youth International Party., also 
known as Yippies, is a loosely knit, ’ 
antiestablishment, revolutionary youth 
organization formed in New York ^ity in 
January, 1968, 

; The Student Mobilization Committee 
to End the War in Vietnam (SMC) is con- 
trolled by the Socialist Workers Party 
(SWP) and its youth affiliate. Young 
.Socialist Alliance. SMC initiates and 
supports public demonstrations against 
the .war in Southeast Asia. 

The SWP has been designated pursuant 
to Executive Order 10450. 

As the youth organization of the 
Socialist Workers Party (SWP) , the Young 
Socialist Alliance (YSA), serves as the 
main source of recruitment into that' 
organization. The YSA is described in the mast 
head of its official publication, "The 
Young Socialist Organizer", as "A multi- 
national revolutionary socialist youth 
organizat ion" . 




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FL0EIDA P»PLES PLATFi>EM WALITIOI? (FPPC) 


la ®©t®fo®r, 1970, the Radical Action 
CoalitiOEE (BAG) received recognition as 
an approved organisation at the University 
of Sonth Florida (USF) , Tampa, Florida, 

X^AO i^ mado np Oj;: j,'adical 


liberal peace 


gronps at USF who want to 
nt in the Tampa Bay area. 




Sonrce further advised that the February 23, 1972 


issued of the "Miami News’*, a local daily newspaper in Miami, 
Florida, stated the FPPC will sponsor two days of non~ 
violent protests in Miami Beach during the July Democratic 


National Convention ^ The primary focus o: 


w 


ietnam back into the campaign. The FPPC 


as described as ’’anti^sessist , anti-racist, and anti- 


imperialist”. 




Source said the address for FPPC in Tampa, Florida 
is Post Office Bo.^ 17521, 



|is a member of the People’s 
GoaiHEion lor. peace and Justice, who is 
active in Election Year Strategy Information 


The People's Coalition for Peace and 
Justice (PCPJ) has described itself as being 
headquartered at 1029 Vermont Avenue, 'N. W,, 
Washington, D, C,, and as consisting of over 
100 organizations which are using massive, 
civil disobedience to combat racism, poverty, 
repression, and war. 


CONF^EHTIAL 


3 . 









FLORIDA PE OPLES PLATFORM COALITION (FPPO) 

Election Year Strategy Information 
Center (EYSIC) was set up by members of PCPJ 
and the May Day Collective (MDC) to coordinate 
Hew Left activities throughout 

the United States to culminate with demon- 
■? pr Rep-ibl N?.td<Tirial Con-'- 

vent ion, San Diego, California, 

May Day Collective (MDC) is self- 
described as a multi-issue organization 
which formed as a result of the May, 1971 
activities in Washington, D, C„ 

[will leave Hew York City on February 

25. 1972, to travel to Tamm, Florida, for the purpose of 
meeting with members of a once active May Day Collective 
from throughout the Sout heast United States, The meeting 
will be to make plans for demonstrations by peace groups 
at the Democratic Hational Convention in Miami, 



TP T-^3 


©n January 26, 1972, Post Office Box 17521, Tampa, 

was issued to the FPPC„ Making apnlication for the Post 

Office Rex was 

|Th© kind Of business stated on the application was 

"political activity group". 



I Ireserved space in the USF Fellowship 

Chapel for Saturday and Sunday, February 26-27, 1972, 


mAL 



con: 



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V * V JL iri lu 


FMIDA PEOPLES PLATFORM COALITION (FPPC) 

* ^ ir y. V V'AUji o'.''^-i.'‘*JL' ., Av.'iw ^ ro / 


through ChaplainI l of the chapel for meetings of 

a grdhp calied‘-*^M?§siSi?^f^^the' NeW“^ ^ mefc+.:ci.t: - 


.. xled tIi'Ssi-i'ii <- i th^' ^xie , 

TP T-.R 



known as 

^imlpE , '■' ''ThB.^Fl&$l!5^‘^pl8W£ei 

hti£o&* of r^dididl-^^f'oG^'^^-'wKihh^’i^^beih^ fdriSied^*ti3^pT'Aii-^fdy^' '~ 
deittohstratldh^^duilhg^'th)e‘‘Detto6Tatfc-^CohVhhtiori*^in^Miam'£^ 
liiteS:"’thls-*^'':7dhr‘;‘^* *'Th^ md^t'$hj 'wh^' t''ery^§hc!fht*-*and^%!^s^‘'*-^ 



that 


'dir* ^vhd ffegifet^^eQ^'^Oiii’d h^c^ivfe d^’^icopy Sf^thd^*9ie§i§'firdfeihn 

in ^tfio '.vould j • v «• -Jt c; py c£ the registratxon 


Saturday session lasted from 9:00 AM to 11:00 PM 
and Sunday^^^’diidh ¥^dffii^’d-10G'^AM^1anj:Ii®‘ap 4.¥O0 ^^pM * 

jhia xn^ dBiht s-^ ^ePe* * h^ -Fldia ^a*-^ j^ed pi ef §QcBj 1 i t-i dfi 

^ds^-ndt-^adin^^td agi^ah^^drahd^mhfet^t^bf^-'thd-^defooh’strhtiohs 
hut ddlv^ as-^d fe-'hiid'ifag^fo^fce'*to’'‘'‘'&'§t* thd-^ dhfadn'st!^^^ 
tobvin'g ; • it ^ai^fadhtioheid^that the She idlidt^Whf'fefeyd^ Party 
dnd' Ybung Sohiiri§t’ diL^dnhh ^ere shbclfifc’dll^bibMg 
hSf^clhdhd^ hdicaude'^'h^ thdit‘^tendhhci^d“ to *■ tt^'^ ahd^f dliS'the 
whb'lh ‘^.ho^7'~ It'^v/^fe miade*^ cLe'ar*^ that aythbugh'-^pjaiis^^cai^^^^ 
fUf* aetd 6f nOfa°‘t^dl’bht^~ cltlL*- dishbedifeidoey '^if^dhy Igthilip^ 
or- otghliizhtlbh decided td^gb further .' nO'- attempt-y wOUi^j^^be 
mdde*:hythe Fl&r'ida-^PObpTeJ^ Coaiitio to iteh‘‘^thel?-.'^i *-^ *‘*- 
^lairshdls* f5r~ th^'~ Ads^ dbmOnstra^^ drO' to^hb 
Idiy - the ’ yiOtiaate' 


b£_dQcJ;or_5: 


to 


ftarhi'sfa iogdL^aiid' ^ ad5iitdhoe*to * thW^d'dfeOh^^ 

tinder' the‘h^me-':**0pOrdtiOh~MOwPl6i^’^^^^^ "' * aem->/'Sc,v i*;.»rs 


A '^1* 




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meat ioned that l 
Florida ioi"'l t^5S^e^]^ 


^thie 'htpg‘pfit^gOveyntfe]^^^ fa'e- al4h‘ 

I woWid''iptbhabi b’e 'cbftiiSi^'to 

S^eSF^Sbiakln^ ' touii b:§x t’ . 


't'.h >• != li 


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CQNFMmTIAT. 

FLORIDA PEOP LE PLatfOK^ 

has been set np^irsni°n?f a similar organization 
Convention under the name ^©publication 

Florida People's Coaii+--irt Saturday Coalition and that the 
to share Ideal ?? waf !? closely with them 

of the extreme secrecv that because 

"radicals” had not even “©©tings ^ many 

better represln?lliirioSw the meeting and 

meeting, No date wal II? at the next 

indications are thll^r^ifl^bl^^irL^lSS?^ 

Vp Ti-g 


War Veterans Againet the 

war (.vyAW).,is a national veterans' 
organization with a natiolS IfSfc'e 
located at 25 West 26th Street, W York 
"lo Published ob^4ct fie 

If filhS 5*" immediate, d^ssation 

American troops from Indochina”. 

coalition , ''formeSf LCS ' « 

Coalition, took place -in Peoples Platform 

the University of South Ploridn^^S*^® center on campus at 
25 through the 27th? 1972 !^ ' Tampa,. Florida* February 

areas as TlllIhllllll^TalL^^St ®“®^ 

Jacksonville, and Miami? Petersburg, Gainesville, 

and secured\ousing* ^Sholt^^i^?' delegates registered 
place. loosing. .Short, informal discussions took 

met on campSs^?rill^ the delegates 
followed and agenda. The agenda was never 

and was actually a failure?^ aBcomplish anything 

co^p^e^^ial 




talked abonfit the lormAtion of an 

anti=war union. 

««■ 

Mention was wade of obtaining a citizens action 
pledge and a three« point program for peace in Indo-6hina 
was distributed. The citizens pledge was to get people, 
as well as candidates in the forthcoming Presidential 
election., to sign the pledge before the Florida primaries. 


The conference turned into a defensiveness by the 
l?ampa people who feared other groups, such- as from Miami, 
might preempt their- plans for the forthcoming, Democratic 
National Convention, 


Nothing concrete was developed at this conference 
wit^h the possible exception that the Miami contingent 
noticed the obvious weakness of the up-state movement and 
decided they themselves might take control of activities 
that should take place in Miami at the forthcoming 
Democratic National Convention. 



Qn l ~| , advised that the follow- 

ing material was received from the FPPC by mail. Source 
was not aware if ,the list of namOs which appears thereon 
consisted of attendees at the conference or contacts for 
the obtaining of further information. 


■bo 

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7 , 



Peoples FI 

Mom 1.73^.^ - 


€?^aMtE<i52s 
Tampa^Fi B3€?JLil 


SixioiBaiy or S-tatev/ide lieeting 
for Fla. People's Coalition 

- the conference seewod to have gone really irells and it turned out that ue 
got More acconplished thansome people thought that ire did. !/e established a 
nevrsletter to co-ordinate our activities of i/liich tills is the first (ire'll 

get a bulk rate postage periait as soon as possible) 

The cost of the iieeting (for food,, rent for tiie building, paper, projector, 
etc.) Game out to ;^73»65, and ue brought in froia the ./2.00fees and donations a 

total of 075.40 that Lieans ire actually came out '51.75 ahead...... 

:=.he organizational structure that ire arrived at provided fcr a coordinating 
body to act as a cosssjunicating and directing agent for the actions of local 
bodies on a stateiri.de level, ibaeetlng of the Co-ordinating bodj" i.rill be announced 
and should be sometine in early Ihirch, probaM.y the -12th or the 19th-( T.'e need 
to know the naires of 2 representatives from each fbglon. ~.!e irill p^,jablisli a 
state offioe-iind a lilairi office as soon as funds and jiersonriel are .'vailable, 

TIE would also like to try to send two repi'esentativos to the Santi .Sarbara 
"People's Platform" nesting Larch iGth— 19th. 

;.'e should began to reach to the various groups and orgemizations around the 
state (iJomen, peace — anti-war, workers, blacks, and student groups), to begJui to 
build our oini people’s Platform and to build for the Convention ....... . 

Outline of Demonstrations at Democratic national Convention, iriani Beach, 

July 9-14: 

: . — Massive, legail, peaceful (conservative expectation of 25—30 thou) 

’ — ITo moi'e than 2 days ’ ^ 

—Rally— iiarch— Demonstrations .at the convention sites preceded by 
teach-ins, guerilla, theatre, rallys, slides— films, mobile display 
. • teeuas, and other educational actions— large j)03ters of IjAltilC 

—Mot a rock and roll "festival of life" 

-iaake a clear political statements that vie are independent of the 
Democratic isarty, we do not stipport a liberal caaididate, that ire 
must "evict niaren", that we mast have an end tia the US involve, lent 
in SE Asia, .... that we use the 3point peace jsroposal and the 
.. citizens action 'pledge -to clarify tbe positions of the candidates 

^ and to develop a. iDA capability. . . - . and that ire force the 

candidates 'bo speals to the issue of the war, as vrell as the ' 

. domestic issues of the People's Platform.... the Mi.'RO platform 

• is enclosed. . . . ( ' a 




, In 'build our organization and the demonstrations in July, ue have set up a 
spealting tour ; 

entative schdule : 

Kon— Larch 6 — Pensacola— University of Ifes't Fla. 

Jacksonville — 5 Jacksonville Universit 3 "? 
“ue— Larch 7 — Gainesville— Uof F 
Tallahassee— FSU 
Ued-tbrch C — “'"aiupa- USF 

^ ” St. Pete— St. Pete JC 

•rhurs— Larch 9 — Sarasota— ileir College— Ft.Lejrers?' 

Ft. Lauderdale— Brovreu’d JG 
Fri— ibrch 10 — Liani— Uof iriairi 

. iiia.ri Dade JG 


Speakers; Reniuie Davis, Susan Gregorj’’, Ja;"" Cra.ven, Carol Kitchens, Carol 
Oullu.;!, and some of FPC folks......... 

General Pl^; ilTtenioon — Large rally — ^national s'pealcers, FPC ■ s'iJealcer , 

I* . local moderatoi-— G'poaker— outdoor disxjla 3 ''s and .uaybe music . 

Evening — a-^ller group teach— in sessi orr.s (iinrler 500) to 

allow for close interaction \.d.th i'T'G-IJat'l .fo.1 ir..? 
KARLIC slides and movies...,. 

Schedule should include press conferences, talk shovrs (radio— tv) , plenty of 
publicity, leaflets, posters, etc..... 

liust have transportation fee and/or hotiorariians and xser/rission to ask for 
donations... tje’re hurtin’ ^or cash. ........ -we should "bo 3 ncopporated 

soon to eliminate most 6f the book trork. ......... Carol said she got really. 

great feelahigs from our group and tliat she sends her love.. to everyone.... 

let's get it on yoxars in struggle, 

-f-he U arapa Collective FPC 


i 



FI/G>r£aa-FeC'p2es F;lGtS©3rffi-3 C©aIfi^;S•«^sa 
2B©:s s:7S2S3:- Tajsapa,Fi 



FXoxida, PeopXe’s CoaXltion,CentmX Coordinating Coranittoe 

P.O. Box X752X. T ain pa 3 X6X^ 

. I I (Ask fori I I (Ask f or| 

W ^ ' 

PXease send in designs for a kutton for FPC. AXso send in names 

of the tvio representatives from your area to the co-ordinating committee. 

a * * ' 

Copies of the Automated Air. V/ar Packet which wa.s pa.ssf'd around during 
the conference can "be ohtained from? ® ■ 

■. ' ■ NARMIC (Na.tion.aX Action/Re search on MiXitary 
IndustriaX C<wnpiex) projooc of the 
Americ*=-n Friends - Service Committee 
• X60 North X5th Street 
^PhiXadeXphiaj, PrmnsyXvania X9X02 

NOTE; Deduct 4.0^ for' orders of ■ XO or more packets — Add XO^ of order 
for postage r-nd handXing, ■ • 


. f 





COi 


irnAL 



THE THEBE POINT PROGRAM FOR JEEf^CE IN IMDO-CHIMA 


1972 is the twenty-se-venth yesr of the Indo-Chine. ’ter and the 
eleventh anniversary of the first American killed in that war. It 
is also an election year in the United Sta,tes. In the last two 
elections the Amerlo->n People have voted overwhelmingly for peace 
and got only talk and endless war. 

In 1972 the American people refuse to ho fooled ag-iin. Any can- 
didate for puhllo office in 1972 has a responsihility to the American 
peoples and particularly to the soldiers who have hoen sent to die in 
Indo—Chinag to the veteransj' to the prisoners of war and their 
famllless as well a.s .to the men, x^omen, and • cshildron of Indo— China, 
to pledge herself /himself to the policies that will in fact end the 
war. The American tragedy in Vietna.m cannot he resolved hy slick ad- 
vertising or propaganda circuses. 

The follovTing program is hoth Just and practical. It will end 
the war. It X'jlll hrlng the American prisoners of war home. It will 
stop' the killing. It will permit the people of Indo-China to settle 
their own affairs in peace. Wo candidate x>rho refuses to pledge 
herself /himself t.o such a program for peace deserves support. 

1. Within twenty— four hoxnrs of the Ina.uguration the next 
President will end all air, ground and naval operations in Indo-Chin a, 

The way to stop the killing is to cease all military operations. 

2 . Upon taking office, the next President x»rlll amiounoe a date 
not later t-han April 20, 1973 hy x>Thioh the withdrawal from Indo-China 
of all remaining U» S. personnel will he completed. Thts process of 


withdrawal will begin immediately and x^ill he phased with the retxrrn 
of U. So Prisoners. 

The wa,y to free our prisoners is to convince those who hold 
then that the U, S. no longer intends to impose governnents on 
Indo-China. ' . ’ 

3® The next President will announce on Inauguration Day that 
the- United States will no longer finance any government in Saigon 
that keeps tens of thousand-s of political prisoners ir .1all. suppresses 
opposit ion n ewspapers, harasses political ' meetings or engages in 
other forms of repression- which makes a peaceful political accomodation 
in South Vietnam irapossihle. All aid -to the Thieu gox'ernment which 
enables it to carry on the war a.gainst the Vietnamese people vTill he 
terminated on February .20. 19 7 3. A l l economic and mil itary a id to_the 
military regimes of haos and C am bodia w ill he__ similar Ly termin ated . 

There cajc he no political accomodation in Indo— Cilna as long as 
the UoS«- finances war and props up dictators vrico have vowed they will 
never make pea.oe, . 





NATIONAL WELFARE RIGHTS ORGANIZ-ATIOi' 



POOR PEOPLE ' S . PLATFCRI^ 


I. The 'Family -Assistance Plan as proposed in- HR -1 must"’ he defeated. 

No pa tchv/ork amendments can change its repressive chara_cter and anti- 
poor intent. HR -1 and its accompanying amendments .constitute a brutal 
attack upon the children of this country'^nd must be skopned. 

' * " . I ‘ . 

II. Ail Americans must be guaranteed the right to an adequate income 

(calculated by the Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics at 
’$6500 for a family of four) as proposed in the .NVJRO adequate income 
plan. Every child must have the right to a decent home., an adequate 
'diet., clothing^ health care and the other basic necessities of life. 
Every child must be assured at least the minimal protections of a- 
guaranteed, adequate income. * _ ■ 

iii, ■ Poor’ people' must be represented In 'thd national nominating 
coh’ventions in ' proportion to their num.ber in the 'general population. 
All candidates must be committed to taking every affirmative action 

r 

possible to insure that their delegate slates are so balanced. The 
Democratic Party must extend the new guidelines' guaranteeing "pre- 
viously discriminated agdicist groups" (enlmerated therein as "women, 
young 'people, and minorities") proportional representation to speci- 
fically include poor people. ' ' ' - ' 

IV.. All Americans should have their economip security assured through 
£ comprehensive program which includes broadening of the m.inimum 
’.^age requirements, creation of meaningful public service jobs, insti- 
' tution of a system of supplementary payments for those whose wages 
do not provide an adequate income, and provision for payment of 'an 
adequate income for all those unable to work. 




9 


im 


V, -All American children must be assured creative' and continuing 

child-v?elf are programs designed to support and supplement every 

aspect of a child's life; a nutn'-hm* nin!=; B. (2.0 C CH t I^TTIO Qdcrj.U.G'bG 

/ 

clothing^’ quality medical treatment^ preventative he’al'^.j' care^ dental 
care apd the benefits of life v/ithin a family structure, 

VI, Co-operation v;ith organized groups of poor people must be re- 
cognized as the 1'egitim.ate means of involving poor communities, Poli-" 

■tical parties^ ’candidatesj and the- government institutions at all 
■ ■ . ■ . . ... ^ . . 
levels must be committed to v/orking with and supporting poor people's 

I 

organizations and end the tokenism and co-optation that has' chara- 
cterized past dealings. 

VII, The myths -about poor people and welfare must actively- be'ekpdsed 
.^and combatted. Those who v?ish' the support of -poor people and their 

t . 

friends must begin leading the fight against s'udi slanders as that 

the reason for v/elfare is that some people- s-imply do no-t wish to v.'orkj 

that most vjelfare recipients are black' people 'who have moved to urban 

area's in order to dravi welfare; that all welfare m.others" do is have 

illegitimate children; that I'/eifare is the good life of color TV's 

and Cadillacs; that most vjelfare recipients are cheaters; or that 

most of the tax revenues go to vjelfare, Thes^ lies must be shovm for 

what they are,' -and the truth told: that .the welfare system is a cruel 

hoax that helps perpetuate the misery of poor people and guarantees ti.a 

that the children forced to rely on it will never have a chance i'n i*" 
... ' ' ■ 



CITIZEN'S ACTION PLEDGE 


Candidate's Pled.r;e 

THE PRESIDENT of the United States must immediate sly stop the bomhing 
and all other military operations in Indochina o 

Simultaneously 5 the President must immediately set a date for the compl' 
withdrawal within three months of U«S* personnel and rnii'^tary equipraenc 
and end all support for the Thieu regime in Saigon and t e military 
regimes of Laos and Cambodia* • . . 

THE CONGRESS of the United States must cut off all funds for U»S» milit 
involvement _a.nd support for the military regimes in Indochina.* 

Tens of billions "of .dollars now appropriated for war and militaris.m 
should be redirected to meet the urgent hmman needs of people for jobs, 
adequate' income, housing, health care and education* 

•'-We believe that all cnndida.tes for office and delegates to the Democrat:’ 
and Republican conventions should co'mmit themselves’ to this Candidate^ 
Pledge* 

1 ■ ' . ^ 


> 

i 


* 



CO] 


INTIAL 


FLORIDA PEOPLES PLATFORM COALITION (FPPC) 


This document .contains neither recommendations 
nor conclusions of the FBI. It is the property of the 
FBI and is loaned to your agency; it_and its contents are 
no b bO he dis bir ijjLi bt;u. ouboidv^^ youx* agency* » 





FD-323 (Rev.. 1 1-29-61) 



In Reply, Please Re^er to 
File No. 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 
tEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 

r 

Tampa, Florida 
March 9, 1972 


Title FLORIDA PEOPLES PLATFORM COALITION 

(FPPC) 


Character 

Reference Memorandum dated and captioned as 
above at Tampa, Florida 


All sources (except any listed helov) whose identities 
are concealed in referenced communication have furnished reliable 
information in the past. 


Jf'Jh contains neither recommendations nor conclusions of the FBI, It Is the property 

ol the FBI and Is loaned to your agency; It and Its contents are not to be distributed outside 
your agency. 


L 


rc>-s6 (rtov.-. 5-22-6-!) 




Via 


AIRTEL 


DECLASSIFICATION J»TH01ITY DERIV 2D FlOH: 
FBI AUTOMATIC DE^WSIFICATIOH GUIDE 
DATE 02-13-Z01Z | 

FBI' ! 


Date: 3 / 9/72 


Transmit the following in 


(Type in plaintext or code) 


(Priority) 










K 



TO: DIRECTOR, FBI 

FROM: SAC, TAMPA (100-2945) (P) 

SUBJECT: CHANGED 

- FLORIDA PEOPLES PLATFORM COALITION (FPPC), aka 

Floi-ida People's Coalition 

IS NEV/ LEFT 

rrujmjg 

l^ked changed to reflect additional name 
of FPPC as Florida People's Coalition. 

Re Miami airtel and LHM 2/17/72, entitled '’DAVID 
TYRE DEI -LINGER, aka; FT AL (TRAVEL OF DSFiiNDANTS) ARL - 
CO'NSPIRACY: COC , 00: CHICAGO", Miami teletype to the^^ 
Bureau 2/25/72, New York teletype to the Bureau 2/23/7^. 
.and New YorK airtel and LIfll 2/2S/72, entitled "ELECTION 
YEAR STRATEGY INFORM-A.TION CENTER, IS » NL". 

Enclosed for the Bureau are ten copies of an 
LHM captioned and dated as above. Copies being designated 
for Miami and Jacksonville in view ot their interest in 
captioned organization, and one copy to New York, San 
Diego, and WFO for information. 

Copies of the LHM are also being designated for 
U. S. Secret Service, Tampa, Naval Investigative Service 
Organization, Orlando, Office of Special 'Investigations, ^ 
Patrick Air Force. Base, and Military Intelligence, rlajioo 
for information purposes. ' ^ 

(100-47 


2 


t/ 



1 . 

1 


- Bureau (Enc. 10) 
Jacksonville (Enc, 2) 
Miami (100-16596) (Enc. 2) 
New York (Enc. 1) (INFO) 

- San Diego (Enc . 1) (INFO) 


1 “ WFO 
3 - Tampa • 

(1 ~ 100-2834, MIDEM) 

■TVHrraf 
( 12 ) 


13 0 

172) (Enc. 1) (INFO) , 


Apprev 


Sent 


Sp-soa'i Age.nl in Charge 




TP 100-2945 


'T'hft t.H” has been classified '’CiiS?=T??Siitial’' to 
protect TP T-T and other sources ox oowLlx^uin" ••.'hose 

xdentxties if disclosed could be detrimental to national 
defense interests of the U. S, 

SOURCIS 


Identity 



Location. 



100-2945-4 


Instant LHM, first 
reporting? pa^^e. 4, ■ 
Instant LHM, first 
reporting page 5 


Instant LHH, fii'st 
reporting page 7. 


LEADS 

• MIAMI AND JACKSONVILLE 

Y/ill maintain contact with sources for further 
information on FPPC activities. 


TAMPA 

AT TAMPA-, FLORIDA 

Will follow captioned matter .closely and report 
information developed to the' Bureau “and interested offices. 


bo 

b7! 

b7: 



FD-36 {Rev. 5-22-64) 


Transmit the following in 


NEW YORK 


% 


Date: 


3/11/72 


CODE 

(Type in plaintext or code) 
(Priority) 


40 


FROM 


MIAMI (80-1353) 


MIDEM, 


ON MARCH TEN, SEVENTYTWO, COP ROCKY POMERANCE, MIAMI 
BEACH, FLA., PD, STATE DIRECTOR OF SECURITY FOR THE 
DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION, MIAMI BEACH, ADVISED THAT 
THE MARCH FIVE, SEVENTYTWO, SUNDAY ISSUE "NEW YORK TIMES" 
CONTAINED AN ARTICLE RELATING TO A MEETING HELD BY AN 


ORGANIZATION KNOWN AS THE "RED BALLOON" AT A NY STATE 

X "7^0/^ y' 

COLLEGE, ST-«0^ BROOK, LONG ISLAND, NY, ON MARCH THREE OR 


FOUR, SEVENTYTWO. 

CHIEF POMERANCE SAID THE MEETING 


REFERS- ^ 


TO THE POSSIBILITY OF INDIVIDUALS FROM THE GROUP COMING TO 
MIAMI FOR INSTANT CONVENTION. 


NY IS REQUESTED TO FURNISH ANY PERTINENT DATA OBTAINED 
FROM INFORMANTS OR SOURCES RE INS&THffiE^I^^ 

THEREIN BY SUBVERSIVE GROUPS. ' ' 




JU-"rxIe 

JPM/apj 


Appr^j^^d: 


Se- 




-M Per 


Special 'Agent in 


U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE; 1971 -413—136 


DIRECTOR, EBI 


3/13/72 


SAC, MIAMI (80-1353) (P) 
MIDEM 


With regard to advance planning by Miami Office 
for the Democratic National Convention (DNC) , to be held 
in Miami July 10 - 14^ 1972, Miami is preparing photographic 
albums containing descriptive and subversive characteriza- 
tions of individuals who can logically be expected to 
travel to Miami and who have been identified as activists 
in the New Left Movement. The use of these albums should 
prove advantageous to agents of this office in identifying 
individuals observed during surveillances, as well as pro- 
viding appropriate characterizations in submitting teletype 
summaries to the Bureau, thus eliminating the need for having 
auxiliary offices submit these characterizations. One of 
these albums will be maintained by the Miami Office, one 
furnished to tl. S. Secret Service, and another, containing 
only photographs and descriptions, will be made available 
for use during the convention to the Miami Beach Police 
Department, who has the specific responsibility for security 
at the convention site. 


In connection with the preparation of these albums, 
the Bureau is requested to consider canvassing all offices, 
or to authorize Miami to do so, furnishing a copy of the 
Bureau approved form utilized during previous conventions, 
a copy of which is enclosed. These offices should be in- 
structed to furnish Miami three copies each of a photograph, 
descriptive data, and brief subversive characterization of 
each individual who, because of his background and past 
activities, can logically be expected to appear in Miami and 
engage in disruptive activities during the convention. This 
should include persons who are leaders or members of any 
organization in which the Bureau has an interest, whether it 
bo because of subversive, right wing, Now Left, black nation- 
alist, civil rights, antiwar, or peace activities. It should 
also include any individual who is known to be violence pronj 
and who might be attracted to widely publicized function^ 
such as a national political convention. 

2 - Bureau (End 1)(RM) 

1 ~ San Diego (Info) (CALREP) (RM) 

Miami 
JCB/dk 
(4) 








MM 80-1353 


laore sp^cixic».x]Ly, ulx oxxxut;;&i uuuulu jluxuIsu 
the requested information to Miami concerning the following, 
which is not meant to be all inclusive: 

1. All leading activists in the New Left or anti- 
war or peace activities who have previously engaged in 
the leadership of demonstrations which resulted in vidence 
or mass arrests. This would include the Weatherman under- 
ground organization and New Left fugitives. 

2. All individuals, regardless of organizational 
affiliation, who attended planning conferences or meetings 
concerning specific plans to demonstrate at the DNC. This 
would include recent conferences of YIP^ PCPJ, NWRO, War 

Tax Resistance, War Resisters League, and White Panther Party. 

3. Any individual who has encouraged others to engage 
in demonstrations at the DNC or who has requested, on behalf 
of some organization, volunteers interested in such activities. 

Additionally, it Is felt it would be appropriate 
at this time for the Bureau to remind each office that 
any information developed relating to disruptive activities 
and violence discussed during the planning sessions of organi- 
zations intending to attend the convention, statements of 
leaders, key activists, etc. should be recorded in form suit- 
able for testimony at a later date. This would be vital 
to successful prosecution of any anti-riot cases which may 
develop incideateil to the convention. 

The Bureau may wish at this time to also consider 
similar instructions to all offices with regard to the 
Republican National Convention in San Diego. 


IT 

'i 

: J 

& 






^1 


I; J 


.j 


:| 


hi 


DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION PLANNING SUMMARY. MARCH TO, 1972 


Chief , Pomeranc e Introduced new planning memberl land the 

Chief’s guest, ! | Special Assistant to tns, Setf etary of the 


Treasury, U.S. Secret Service 
OLD BUSINESS 

1. Security for Public Utilities 


REQUIRED ACTION OR ACTION TAKEN 

Members to initiate in own JuriS' 
di cti on . 


2, 


Procedures for mass arrests. Being explored. Corrections and 

identifying prisoners, transporting. Rehabilitation people to submit 
booking and holding. . r. 


3. Arrest poviers for Miami officers. 

4. Manpower, missions, etc. 

5. Camp and forum sites. 

6. Ordinance package. 

7. Comuni cations, 

8. Church and Community Leaders Seminar 

9 . Auxiliary police. 

10. Fingerprinting 


guidelines. Tentative procedure: 
to County Jail with armed escort-- 
hearing -- stockade (with alternabe 
tives). Incidental arrests proce^ic 
locally. Should conduct trial 
runs. I 


Procedure b eing rese arched by 

and Major 


To be ready for review at March 23rd 
meeting. Mid-week mini meetings 
to be scheduled. 

Premature -- policy matter. 


— finalizing. To utilize 

County and State laws. 

All agencies already mutually 

involved, pJsns being fonmulated 
with assistance from Florida State 
Department of Services. 

Pai^ticlp ated a s did 


PfrectoJ 


and ciiisfr 


Chief Pommce mde $ nfk) Hpdk, 

To be utilized with on-dUty personnel 
oriented*^^^^^^'^^^°”’ convention 


11- Political rallies (primary) 
3// 





Method being formulated t 
process prints. Secre,^' 
has team scheculed tr 
here during Mey, 

Miami Beach 

clothesoj 
Servl 


_ . ijfia 

vent ion. 













In Reply, Please Rejer to 

FUeNo. 100-16573 





NTIAL 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 


FEDERAL BDRBAU OF INVESTIGATION 

DICLASSTFICATIOU ADTHORITT I»ERI¥ 1 I) FROM: 
FBI MJTOHiTIC RICLASSIFICATIOH GUIDl 

Miami, Florida date 02=13-2012 

March 14, 1972 


Rl: MIAMI SNOWPLOW COMPANY 

’'OPERATION SNOWPLOW” 

MIAMI, FLORIDA 

INTERNAL SECURITY - NEW LEFT 

DEMONSTRATIONS DURING DEMOCRATIC 
NATIONAL CONVENTION, MIAMI BEACH, 
FLORIDA, JULY, 1972 


Origin - Purpose 


The Miami Snowplow Company, sometimes referred to 
as ’’Operation Snowplow” or simply ’’Snowplow”, is a coalition 
of 22 organizations founded in Miami, Florida, in January, 
1972. Its purpose is to provide such services as housing, 
food, legal aid, medical aid and a communications network 
for the expected influx of young protestors, observers, and 
non— delegates who come to Miami Beach for the Democratic 
National Convention. ’’Snowplow’s” stated purpose is to work 
toward a peaceful convention and to protect the rights of 
protestors. It is a non-political group that intends to 
provide services for anyone in need. 


MM T-1 


The name "Miami Snowplow” was chosen since the 
coalition wanted the sort of name that someone in the middle 
of Kansas would not forget. 


MM T~1 


Organizations in Coalition 



organizations participating in ’’Operation 



tr' tr' 




MIAMI SNOWPLOW COMPANY 


1 . Switchboard 
2i Free Medic a. 1 Clinic 

3. National Organization ior Women 

4. American Civil Liberties Union 

5. Florida International University (Police 
Training Project) 

6. Young Socialist Alliance (YSA) 

7 . Underground Radio Network 

8. Radio Station WBUS 

9. ’’The Daily Plahet” 

10. ’’The Free Press” 

11 University of Miami Chaplains 

12 The Women’s Center 

13. People’s Party 

14. Miami Liberation Front (MLF) 

15. Christian Community Leadership Conference 

16. Southern Christian Leadership Conference 

17. Gay Liberation Front 

18. Interfaith Council for Social Justice 

19. Free Counseling Clinic 

20. New Community School 

21. Center for Dialogue 

22. Dade County Youth Relations Board 

”Miami News” 
Miami, Florida 
2/2/72 

YSA: As the youth organization of the 

Socialist Workers Party (SWP) , the Young 
Socialist Alliance (YSA) serves as the 
main source of recruitment into that 
organization. The YSA is described in 
the masthead of its official publication, 

’’The Young Socialist Organizer", as "A 
multinational revolutionary socialist 
youth organization”. 

The SWP has been designated pursuant to 
Executive Order 10450. 


INTIAL 


MIAMI SNOWPLOW COMPANY 


MLF: The MLP is a local coalition of 

students, women, and young workers who 
share in a common opposition to racism, 
sexism and imperialism This coalition 
is organized around the concensus that 
their must be co-ordinated non-violent 
opposition and confrontation to the 
Democratic Convention to be held on 
Miami Beach during July, 1972. 

’•The Weather Report” 
Volume 1, Number 2 
Published by MLF 
3/3/72 



3. 


MM T-1 


Headquarters 


"Operation Snowplow” meets every Thursday at the 
Center for Dialogue, 2175 N.W. 26th Street, Miami, Florida 
Their telephone, under the name "Snowplow" (634-8931), is 
located at that address 


CONF^B3^IAL 


fcr' tr' cr' 





CONFIDENT I AL 


RE; MIAMI SNOWPLOW CCMPANY 


MM T-1 



Liaison with Government and Police 
Age ncies 

♦'Operation Snowplow" plans to work with government 
and police agencies to eliminate the conditions that led to 
violence at the 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago. 

"Miami News " 


Law enforcement officials, of both the Miami Beach 
and Miami Police Departments, on written invitation, have 
attended meetings of "Operation Snowplow". 

MM T-2 


Funds 

"Operation Snowplow", in order to carry out their 
objectives, have sought financial aid from various government 
^encies and participating organizations. To date, they have 
been woefully unsuccessful in this endeavor. 



A request by Hal Spaet, Dade County Youth Relations 
Board Chaimian, on behalf of "Operation Snowplow" for $6,500 
to set up an office to coordinate housing, food and crowd 
control help for youthful "non-delegates" to the July Democratic 
National Convention was turned down by the Dade County Com- 
missioners. Spaet stated, "We’re probably going to have a 
great deal of young people here to demonstrate in some way". 
Spaet said that the area has to be prepared for the coming 

CONFmBOTIAL 


^ 4 



SNTIAL 


REj MIAMI SNOWPLOW COMPANY 


of these people in order that their activities may be 
lawful, and as harmonious as possible with the community, 

Dade County Commissioner Harvey Reisman stated he appreciated 
the motives of Spaet "but undue publicity in the press as to 
what you*re doing to Sbsd, dress, and give medical care to 
these people seems to me to imply an invitation to have 
great nvunbers of non-delegates here**. 

’’The Miami Herald” 

Miami, F lor ida 


Funds sought at a Metro Commission meeting on 
February 16, 1972, by ’’Snowplow” representatives was rejected 
by Dade County Manager Ray Goode on February 24, 1972. 

”Miami News” 

Miami. Florida 


Operat ions 


Food 


’’Operation Snowplow” has considered approaching 
local restaurants to determine if they would cooperate in 
furnishing two low-cost meals a day. They would then be 
listed in a pamphlet which would be distributed to youth 
groups who come to Miami. The volume, that would be generated, 
is expected to guarantee a profit. 

’’Operation Snowplow” has also considered the use of 
school cafeterias (recessed during July) and obtaining bulk 
food from state or government agencies who have such staples 
warehoused , 

Shelter 

’’Operation Snowplow" has considered a number of 
locations such as parks and race tracks as possible shelter 
locations. . 


CONFi^NTIAL 


- 5 - 




RE; MIAMI SNOWPLOW COIPANY 


Medical 

1 

"Operation Snowplow" has considered the suggestion 
to contact the Dade County Medical Association to solicite 
volunteer doctors to man a proposed hospital tent 

A representative of the Vietnam Veterans Against 
the War attended a meeting of "Operation Snowplow" and stated 
his organization would set up and supply security for a 
medical tent area to be located somewhere between 10th and 
15th Streets on Miami Beach. The United States Air Force at 
Homestead, Florida, was to be contacted to determine if they 
would provide a helicopter to evacuate seriously injured or 
sick patients to local hospitals. 

Attendees 

The Underground Wire Service, claiming some '400 
progressive radio stations, plan to utilize this' network to 
request those planning to attend the Democratic Convention 
to fill out a questionnaire. Since "Operation Snowplow" 
request for funds has been denied, this plan has been abandoned, 

MM T-2 


Meetings 

"Operation Snowplow" 

Center for Dialogue 
Miami, Florida 

February 10, 1972 

40 persons attended. Areas for acc ommodating youth 

coming to Miami were discussed | was present. 

He advised to raise funds they must become politically 
oriented, "Operation Snowplow" insisted on remaining non- 
political . 



b6 

b7C 

b7D 


6 



CONyP^^IAL 


RE: MIAMI SNOWI'LOW COMPANY 


was fonnd guilty of anti-riot law 
violations that arose from activities 
during the Democratic National Conven- 
tion at Chicago, Illinois, in August, 

1968. Pending an appeal, he was 
released on bond by the United States 
Court of Appeal, Chicago, Illinois 

February 17, 1972 

30 persons attended. They discussed being "shunned 
by political bodies* General attitude of pessimism prevailed 
They felt they had tried to warn officials what might happen 
but the officials would not listen. 

February 24, 1972 

30 persons present. The need for funds was dis- 
cussed. A plan was suggested to publish a list of merchants 
who supported their efforts, 

March 9, 1972 

30 persons attended. A discussion was held concern 
ing what medical assistance could be furnished those coming 
to Miami. Lynn Slavitt, the coordinator, was not present. 

This document contains neither recommendations nor 
conclusions of the FBI. It is the property of the FBI and 
is loaned to your agency; it and its contents are not to be 
distributed outside your agency. 




U’«V. 






In Reply, Please Rejer to 

FUeNo. 100-16573 


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 
FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 


Miani, Florida 
March 14, 1972 


MIAMI SNOWPLOW CCMPANY 
"OPERATION SNOWPLOW" 

MIAMI, FLORIDA 

DEMONSTRATIONS DURING DEMOCRATIC 
NATIONAL CONVENTION, MIAMI BEACH, 
FLORIDA, JULY, 1972 


Title 


Character INTERNAL SECURITY - NEW LEFT 

Reference Memorandum at Miami, Florida, 
dated and captioned as above. 


All sources (except any listed helow) Vhcse identities 
are concealed in referenced communication have furnished reliable 
information in the past. 


This document contains neither recommendations nor conclusions of the FBI. It is the property 
of the FBI and is loaned to your agency; it and its contents are not to be distributed outside 
your agency. 


FD-342 <Rev. 1-26-65) 



''United States Department of Justice 
Federal Bureau of Investigation 


Miami j Florida 
March. 16, 1972 


1 — U. S. Secret: Service, Miami 


REr DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVEiJTXON 


Dear Sir: 


For your information, I am enclosing communications • 
which may be of interest to you. 

Very truly yours. 


Enc, (XJ 





KENNETH W. WITTAKER 

Special Agent in Charge 


1 



s ’ 



- 80-13 53 
1 - 66-2586 
JCB/dk 



(Upon removal of classified enclosures, if any, this transmittal form becomes 
UNCLASSIFIED.) 



DECLASSIFICATION AUTHORITY DERIVED FROM: 
FBI AUTOHATIC DECLASSIFICATION GUIDE 

DATE 02-13-Z01Z 


F B I 

Date: 3/14/72 


Transmit the following in 


(Type in plaintext or code) 


Via AIRTEL 

(Priority) 


TO: DIRECTOR, FBI 

FROM: SAC, MIAMI (100-16573) (P) 

SUBJECT: MIAMI SNOWPLOW COMPANY 

’’OPERATION SNOWPLOW” 

MIAMI , FLORIDA 

INTERNAL SECURITY - NEW LEFT 

MIDEM 

ENCLOSURE 


L 


Enclosed for the Bureau are 12 copies of an 
LHM concerning the Miami Snowplow Company. Copies fur- 
nished Jacksonville and Tampa for information. 


Copies are being disseminated locally to U. S. 
Secret Service, Miami, Florida, and OSI, Patrick Air 
Force Base, Florida. 


4 - Bureau (Enc. 12) (RM) 

(1 - MIDEM) 

1 - Jacksonville (Enc. 1) (RM) (Info) 

1 - Tampa (Enc. 1) (RM) (Info) 
l2^*- Miami 

(1 - 100-165737) (Snowplow) 

100-16291) (Switchboard) 

100-14796) (YSA) 

100-15755) (Daily Planet) 

100-16021) (The Free Press) 
100-15677) (Peoples Party) 
100-15700) (Miami Liberation Frotil?)^ 
(VYAW) 


(1 

(1 

(1 

(1 

(1 

(1 

(1 

(1 



1 - 


100-16340) 
100-16052) 

VMtmgiur> 




(1 - 66-2586) 
JJM:nlm 
(18) 





Approved: 


Special Agent in Chpffg' 



Sent 


.M Per 

☆ u\s.\;/ VERNMFNT PRINTING OFFICE 1S»7I -413-135 


1 


tr' tr' fcr' 




m 100-16573 


SA 


MM T-1 ifi 


I Who furnished Information to 

MM T-2 is a well placed source. 


ADMINISTSATIVE 


Operation Snowplow, a coalition of organizations, 
the majority of which are not subversive in nature, has stated 
its program is non-political. Local government and law 
enforcement agencies have been invited and have attended 
their meetings. In view of this no requests, to conduct 
an active investigation, is being made. Miami, however, 
will keep abreast of their activity through established 
sources . 


CLASSIFICATION 

The LHM has been classified **CopJ*£d^tial” in 
order to protect MM T-1. This source is of continuing 
value and his identity, if disclosed, would detrimentally 
affect the national defense interests of the United States. 





I. 


I 




3/13/72 


g:j:, iim^ni0 iim^*)i27) 


fc^LL.v> I' '£;l j 

(an 

/ ‘Xj-.' K'AV-. «il,3 i03**7il.6) 


£-2tG lG3»-9 m7 fA^iJt>3 7^ ^' 

- / 3 D J - / 7 , / 7 > . 

'r’XiT?.!^ HLU IOO*'H3S /^^/> $ ’>^A, , 

F<a ^ 

uTcXased fose tlic: Laxam iJM. c-xo t%.o 

eacii ^af miX^m^lc mtoxv f ^KtiisliecI fca 

-^^]L»»LC«C5 I* 4 ^JL lill^ 

I^ifeionctl 

Tor Sxdctttsc'tlon €?i' tljte ^mtcm md ’em Elsi^^o, 
i0r «jard£t! cBclosc^i j-ctaaranutjjE:; foy t!stc4 




Joxtaation of Um iiurcsau» hiaid £-Uil 
kci . f . im t.--jrily im mlElmd fcise loiloirli 






13ie piicpose in these cmtscts i© seetJte a 
CQntr&Gt or sul?-eoijtract to sffor4 iiitgreste.4 paxsom in 
special triilBiiag in ■cmmmity conSlict itantrol* cro^4 
coatrol, acm.**yioieot polito proceedurcs, dt-ct^pliaslig'lxig 
''hardwire orioafeatioxi'* tnd ostaMisMBg liaisoB rn.fi other 
iistes of cQaamioatloB bet^^aoB polign ma pQtmtii^ 
dei^astrators 4«i:ii3^ the jsoliticaX, ooBv'emfcious to fee teXd 
at Hiomi Ceooh a»cl -‘ao &ie£o vith the over-^vie^' teias 
JsaiBtoBonce of the social order concoro. for life* 
properfc^?^ aBd tlio preservatio» of' oar presets gover»umfcaX 
systeciy ortboiapcred osid rosstressed. 

porsoBs trained In 3soxs-'i?ioieBt teolmii7ios4, 
this training is designed to afford Interested nersons 
*itthocls of increasing 'their hasic oMiitp' in tnot^ing i,hat to 
recogaire during dlstutrhances and hoi? to defuse o¥or« 

reaction^r draining is accotiplisbed fehroagh eiossroosi 
leeturas and seednar discussions •, 

» 2 »' 



-ic 


\ 





100-^7115 
3.03*9127 
/a' 100*9133 


to savfXCij. 


Lad 


Ih-ia Xn-iti^natcti -ciiuc 
fc5l;Ii ci:o^cc£^{^d 


/.ccQirdm; 

lit c-onacctloB T;itlij — ,:• 

sq:^ ifitairest ia lite ho*. aver, their rcspsnne 

v.’es nPSG ar less, uc^iCtivc in that both iniorEicd 
tIiL.t becoase oi badgetcry Q&mcxzts na edltianal a^aica 



Ifcy. 


Itic nbwh iuCornL^iou i« being fu tninbe-d te 
everit f arther is,qtiirles erd ei^iua ceaeeroing| |phd 


eubaitted-. 


iaxec.\$- cacs rt.-eex'VXMg c*ei.xcoL< nxtel b^iing 


bo 

b7C 

b7D 







■FD-350 CRev. 7-16-63) 


(Mount Clipping in Space Below) 


(Indicate page, name of 
newspaper, city and state.) 


Mtatni H.erald’LQs Anseles Times \V/ire 

^ASHISGTON — ' Repub- 
lic an National- Chairman 
Robert -J. Dole called Friday 
for a three^pronged investi- 
gatibn' of the financial rela-i 
tion^i Between the Amerieaft . 
Telephone and' Telegraph Co.. . 
and the SernocraticRarty. 

Dole charged that A31&T 
hacL agreed td extend tele- 
phone service on credit to 
the 19-72 Democratic Nation- 
al Convention in Miami 
Beach after , thaking “no seri- 
ous-effort to collect’’ a $1.5- 
tiillton bill from the 1968 
NeraocraticiConvention. 

Dole, a Kansas senator, 
called fop an investigation by 
the Justice Department, the 
F e d e-r a f Cominunicatlons 
Commission, and Gongres§. 

Democratic N a t i o na I 
Chairman Lawrence F, 
O’Brien, accused Dole Of lay- 
ing a smokescreen. 

“It is very obvious the Re- ■ 
publican national chairman is 
attempting to divert public 
attention from d major scan- 
dal that is-.feaching right into 
the White House,’’ O’Brien 
said through a spokesman. 

THE CHARGES and coun- 
tercharges by the two party 
chairmen grew out of the in- 
vestigation by the Senate 
Judiciary Committee into 
charges by newspaper colum- 
nist Jack Ander.son that the 
International Telephone and 
Telegraph Co. agreed to l^elp 
underwri te the 1972 Repuhli- 
cari Convention in exchange 



— UriHect-:PreH-Jn)^»'natI«>naI Telephoto j 


Sfen^ Bole (Questions: Demos’ Phone Bih 

, i,:he%RepuMica^.n<iiibnal cIiaifmaiv 


for favorable handling of ah 
anti-trust case. 

Sen. Barry Goldwater (R., 
AWz,) Friday assailed both 
the Judiciary Committee 
hearings and Anderson. 

“Decent men are being 
smeared in the public eye;’’ 
Goldwater said in a state- 
ment in defense of his fellow 
Arizonan, acting Attorney 
General Richard Kleindienst, 
the central figure in the com- 
mittee hearings. AT&T and 
the Democrats disputed the 
charges by Dole. 

AN AT&T spokesman said 
in a ptSs?"'S'ra®ment, .that 


“telephone service at the- 
Democratic National Convenr 
tion will Be on a cash basis, 
— stricly a- business transac- 
tion.” He said the Democrats 
will “pay -administrative and 
engineering-costs to AT&T in 
the next few days, and the ; 
balance -of the estimated tele- 
phone Bili Will be paid before 
the convention opens.” The 
conventiomconvenes July 10. •: 

Richard J, Murphy, manag- 
er of the Democratic Conveh- ^ 
tion, said the convention i 
committee "has contracted to 
pay all telephone installation 
and service costs o n a sphed; 
ule that will assure’ 


MIAMI HERALD 


MIAMI, FLORIDA 


Date: 3/11/72 

Edition: 

Author: 

Editor: 

Title* 

DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL 
CONVENTION 

/ 

Character; 

or 

Classification: 80-1353 

Submitting Office: MIAMI, FLA. 

I I Being Investigated 














■‘'nienFBfefore the '^convS'ion’ 
Opens, ’ 

Neither AT&T nor Murphy 
mentioned the $ 1.5 mUlion 
_ which JDole said is still owed- 
:■ -AT&T from the 1968 Demo- 

f cratic Convention. The Dem- 

; ocrats still have debts report- 
edly totaling $9 million from 
the 1968 campaign. 

Dole said AT&T’s credit 
agreement with the Demo- 
; crats,. on- top- of .the i96$ 
debt, could: be a violation of 
•jiie. federal law that prohihfts 
political contributions by 
corporations. 

“CARlR«INGa.$t.5-mil!ion: 
debt for four years -aild then 
■consenting, to increase the 
size of the debt with no as^ 
surance of repayment must 
be considered, at- the very 
least a iggn^ if not an, out- 
■ 'nsh{ gift;” Bole said: 

"This unaccountable' con- 
tmUgl extension of credit to- , 
the Democratic Party would 
narmally be' considered a 
irto.st unorthodox Business 
-.rishi If. It .is not considered- 
such, 'by AT&T,, the .countwis. 
■entitled' to know why . not.'^ 

Under questioning, Dole 
said.there was no pafailelbe- 
t-wee-n the AT&T credit 
agreement with the Demo- 
prats and the ITT agreement 
to help underwrite the Re^. 
pumican Convention in San 
-i3ole said 

the ITT agreement was with 
a, San Diego ciyic committee 


C |NT^ FO R DfALOG U E OFFERS SERVICES DURING DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION 

^on-politicaUoalition with other local ‘» '“™ = 



From: "Urban Scene", 3/8/72 

Published by Center for 
Urban Studies 
P.O.Box 8002 

Coral Gables, Florida 33124 


SEARCHED__-^1NDEXEDj!^1-P 
SER1AL1ZE^2_FILED 


1 


Criminal Ouatice Prpgram 
FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY 
Tam i ami Trail 
Miami, Florida 33144 
Telephone: 223-2300 


TO: PARTICIPANTS IN DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION TRAINING PROGRAM 


Those officers successfully completing the training program 
developed by Professor Hanewic 2 may receive four academic 
credits at Florida Inter^nati bnal University, The following 
procedure is appl i cabl e 

li \ 

1. Wh'en a program (parti ci pant applies to and 
is accepted as a.re'gular student at Florida , 

International University, he should advise 
the Chairman of Criminal Justice that he 
completed the training program. 

2. After veri f i cati on ,tthe Chairman will 
instruct the student to enroll in CRJ 395 
"Contemporary Issue In Criminal Justice" 
for four credits. The enrollment will be 
processed in the standard form prescribed i 

wtiivCioi V • j 

3.. No addi tdonal . work will be required of 
the student. At the end of the term the 
Chairman will process the appropriate forms 
for four credits. 

Florida International University is extremely pleased to have 
the opportunity to be of service to Miami Beach police officers. 
Hopefully, this may be the beginning of a long, fruitful 
relationship. 


JLLeG : ej i 



Criminal Justice 










DATE 

, 

SAT. FEB. 19 

SHIFT 

* 

* 

1st Platoon & Day Boat Crew 

TIME' 

8 a.m. " 12 noon 

TOPIC 

INPOT BEHAIII08SL SESSIOIt (IBS) — 

mSTRIJCTI)ll 

To be announced (TBA) — ■ 


SAT. FEB. 19 


2nd Platoon, 

Task Force & Night Boat Crew 

V 


4 p.m. - 8 p.m. 


3rd Platoon 


11 aj. - 3 p.m. 



DATE 

SAT. FEB. 26 

♦ 

SHIFT' 

1st Platoon & Day Boat Crew 

TIME 

8 a.m. - 12 noon 

TOPIC 

IKPUT BEHAVIORAL SESSION (IBS) — 

INSTRUCTOR 

To be announced (TBA)' ^ 

DISTRIBUTION 

8 a.m. 

Group Discussion & Input, ^ 

12*noon 


SESSION III 


SAT. FEB. 26 


2nd Platoon, 

Task Force & Night Boat' Crew 


4 p.m. - 8 p.m. 


SUN. FEB. 27 


3rd Platoon 



3 p.m. 





























DATE 


SHIFT 


TIME 


TOPIC 


SAT. 'MARCH 4 


1st Platoon & Day Boat Crew 


> 

8 a.m. - 12 noon ■ 


INPUT ’.BEHAVIORAL SESSION (IBS)- 


INSTRUCTOR To be announced (TBA) 



SUN. MARCH 5 


2nd Platoon, 3^,(1 p]a'(;oon 

Task Force & Night Boat Crew 


4 p.m. - 8 p.m. 


11 a‘j. » 3 p.m. 



DATE 

SAT. MARCH 11 

• ♦ 

' SHIFT 

1st Platoon & Day Boat Crew 

TIME 

8 a.m. - 12 noon' 

TOPIC 

IHPIIT BEKMIORAL SESSION (IBS) — 

INSTRUCTOR 

To be announced (TBA) 


SESSION V , 


SAT. MARCH 11 


2nd Platoon, 

Task Force & Night 


4 p.m. - 8 p.m. 


Boat Crew 




3rd Platoon 


11 a.m. - 3 p,.j 

































5 


Si. MH 19-' 


SHIFT 


1st Platoon i Day Boat Crew 


2nd Platoon, 

Task Force & Night Boat Crew 


3rd Platoon 



8.aj. - 12 noon 


INPDT BEHAVIORAL SESSION (IBS) 


4 p.m. - 8 p.m. 


INSTRUCTOR To be announced (TBA) 


SHIFT 


SAT. MARCH 


11 a.m. ■ 3 p.ni. 



SUN. MARCH 26 


1st Platoon * Day Boat Crew 3rd Platoon 



TOPIC 


8 a.m. “ 12 noon 


INPUT BEHAVIORAL SESSION (IBS)' 


INSTRUCTOR To be announced ((TBA) 


DISTRIBUTION Group Discussion & Input 


4 p.m. - 8 p.m. 































DATE 


SHIFT 


TIHE 


P 



S*T. APRIL I 

SAT. APRIL 1 

1st Platoon & Day Boat Crew 

2nd Platoon, 

Task Force h Night Boat Crew 

8 a.m. - 12 noon 

4 p.m. - 8 p.m. 

PHTinQnpnv nr 


rlULujurlli Ur 




1 Or + IIV'O 

8| a.m. 

riTCTPTCtlTTftM 

l*S* V WU i w ^ 

10 a.m. 

UiolKIoUl iUu 

review a uisL-usaiuii — 
TDC 

11'1'a.m. 
^ 1 

• 

12^oon 


, DATE 


SHIFT 


TIME 


TOPIC 


INSTROCTOR 


SAT. APRIL 8 ; 


1st Platoon & Day Boat Crew 


8 a.m, ^ 12 noon 


SESSION IX 


SAT. APRIL 8 


SUN. APRIL 2 

*1 


3rd Platoon 


I 

11 a.m. - 3 p.m. 





SUN. APRIL 9 


Platoon, ' , . 

Task Force & Night Boat Crew Platoon 


4 p.m. - 8 p.m. 

























n 

SESSIb.t t 


DATE 


SHIFT • 


TIME 


TOPIC 


INSTRUCTOR 


SAT. APRIL 15 


1st Platoon h Day Boat Crew 


8 a.m. . 12 noon 


SAT. APRIL 15 



SAT. APRIL 22 


SESSION n 


SAT. APRIL 22 


SUN. APRIL 16 


3rcl Platoon 



SUN. APRIL 23 


SHIFT 


TIME 


TOPIC 


INSTRUCTOR 


1st PUtoo« i Pay Boat Cre« 3rd Platoon 


8 a.m. - 12 noon 


CONSTITUTIONAL LAW 


Dr. John C. Klotter, Interim Dean 

Southern Police Institute 

University of Louisville 


,a. 


4 p.m-. - 8 p.m. 



a.m. - 3 


































i 


n 

SESsioi, m 


8 . 


DATE 


SHIFT 


TIME 


SAT. APRIL 29 


Ut Platoon & Day Boat Crew 


8 a, ID. - 12 pj. 


SAT, APRIL 29 


2nd Platoon, 

Task Force & Night Boat Crew 


4 p,m. - 8 p.m, 



INSTRUCTOR STATE'S ATTT. 


DISTRIBUTION 


DATE 

SAT. MAY 6 

SHIFT 

1st Platoon & Day Boat Crew 

TIME 

8 a.m, » 12 noon 

TOPIC 

DEPARTMENTAL POLICY 

INSTRUCTOR 

Rocky Pomerance, Chief , 

Miami Beach Police Department 


SESSION nil 


SAT. HAY 6 


2nd Platoon, 

Task Force & Night Boat Crew 


4 p.m. - 6 p.m. 


Lecture 

DISTRIBUTION Review A Discussion 


8 a.m. 
10 a.m. 
Ira.m. 


SUN. APRIL 30_ 

I 


3rd Platoon ■ 


11 a.m. - 3 p.m. 



SUN. MAY 7 


3rd Platoon 



12» noon 




























SHIFT 


SAT, m 13 


1st Platoon & Day Bo, at Crew 


SAT. MAY 13 


2nd Platoon, 

Task Force & Night Boat Crew 


3rd Platoon 


11 aj. - 3 p.m. 



SHIFT 


1st Platoon ■& Day Boat Crew 2nd Platoon, 



TOPIC 


8 a.m. - 12 noon 


EQUIPMENT FAMILIARIZATION 


Task Force A Night Boat Crew 


4 pj. - 8 pj. 


3rd Platoon ■ 


INSTRUCTOR Various 


imtHTtWIlWlitflWiMwiWUlni 



Lecture ^ 

DISTRIBUTION Review & Discussion 





























DATE 

SAT. MAY 27 

■■ 

1st Platoon A Day Boat Crew 

TIME 

8 a.m. - 12 noon 

\ 

' • TOPIC 

EQUIPMENT FAMILIARIZATION 

INSTRUCTOR 

Vari ous _ 


SAT, HAT 27 


2nd Platoon, 

.Task Force i Night Boat Crew 



SUN, MAT 28 

» 

3 


3rd Platoon 


11 a.m. - 3 p.io. 



2vpj, 

3lp,m. 



SHIFT 


TIME 


TOPIC 


SAT. JUNE -3 


SESSION XVII 


SAT, JUNE 3 


8 a.m. - 12 noon 


DEFENSIVE TECHNIQUES 


INSTRUCTOR 5EAD0C 


Lecture 

DISTRIBUTION Review & Discussion 


4 p.m. - 8 p.m. 


8 a.m. 
10 a.m. 

iii.ii. 
12 loon 


y^.m. 


SUN. JUNE 4 


1st Platoon i Da, Boat Cre. fnOlatoon, 


11 a.m. - 3 


p.f 


q*>Ki,v.«i,FMrf'*nn M 0 WK> rw tw^wiw^iwr** >wv n (wy*MPf>-m '«» 




























SHIFT 


TIME 


TOPIC 


SAT. m\l 10 


8 a.m. ■ 12 noon 


OEFEHSIVE Umim 


INSTROCTOR SEADOC 


Lecture : 

DISTRIBUTION Review S Discussion. 


SAT. DUNE 10 


4 p.fn. - 8 p.m. 


a.Ki. 

loLn. 

Il4.ni. 

IBtnoon 


SUN. DUNE 11 


1st Platoon Hay BMt Crew UskS HsM Boat Crew 



DATE 

SAT. DUNE 17 

SHIFT 

1st Platoon &• Day Boat .Crew 

TIME 

8 a.m. - 12 noon . 

TOPIC 

To be announced 

INSTRDCTflR 

Tft ho annminrbfl ■ 

IIW 1 <\Vu 1 VfV 

Uvl UllllUUUwCU 


TDC 

^a.m. 

DISTRIBUTION 

10 a.m. 

Closing Statements 


SESSION m 


SAT. DUNE 17 


2nd Platoon, 

Task Force & Night Boat Crew 


4 p.m. - 8 p.m. 


SUN. DUNE 18 


3rd Platoon 


























Police Department 
ROCKY PDMERANCE 
CHIEr 


12Q MERIDIAN AVENUE 
telephone: 534-75 1 1 


FEBRUARY 14, 1972 



I 

TO ALL PERSONNEL ATTENDING -TRAININe SESSIONS: 

WELCOME TO THE OPENING OF THESE EDUCATICM\L SESSIONS WHICH ARE 
DESIGNED TO ErWJ^CE YOUR PROFESSIONAL CAPABILITIES IN DEALING WITH 
THE PUBLIC. 

OUR IMMEDIATE MISSION IS THE DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION, WHICH 
TAKES PLACE THE WEEK OF JULY 9, 1972. OUR FURTHER GOAL, HOWEVER, 

IS THE DAILY COMPLETION OF LAW ENFORCEMENT TASKS IN OUR TOURIST 
COMMUNITY. ■ 

AS EACH OF YOU ARE AWARE, THE EYES OF THE ENTIRE WORLD WILL BE 
FOCUSED ON THE GREATER MIAMI AREA DURING THIS CONVENTION. I FIRMLY 
BELIEVE THAT THE EFFECTIVE AND HUMANE MANNER IN WHICH WE HANDLE OUR 
POLICE ROLE WILL CREATE ADDITIONAL RESPECT FROM THE REST OF OUR 
NATION AND OTHERS IN THE FREE WORLD. 

I ASK THAT EACH OF YOU GIVE OF YOUR FULLEST TO THIS INNOVATIVE 
TRAINING PROGRAM SO THAT WE CAN REAP THE ^V\XIMLM BENEFIT FOR YOU, 
THE CONMUNITY, AND OUR PROFESSION. I HAVE EVERY CONFIDENCE THAT 
THE SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF THESE COURSES WILL CONTRIBUTE GREATLY 
TOWARDS THE FUTURE OF OUR HONORED PROFESSION. 



CHIEF OF POLICE 


13 



DICLASSIFICATIOM AUTHORITY DEEIUID FR.OH: 
FBI AUTOimTIC DECLJ.SSIFICATIOH C-TJIDI 
DATE 0Z-13-201Z 


3/13/7; 






DLlxm, riit (100-335502) 


or 2 AoiA}^ n'UAim 


for t>ic: ruvcxm. mris elgixt aC an Uf; 

£.‘at-/i and captloneu as aoovt;# Also •^.losea Tor Itiasttl aaO 
raxi !'-i?5gs is one copy of a!?ovo XlSl, 

Oouj^e rcfesTed to in \ 

LOi- is l 3 cing: ctwiKmtial aS iii-tcrmtiOfi 

confcaln??.d tlicsre-inj if disclosed yltliout; paraplirasing, 

couid possibly hv a bo tUo natlOtirJ- ’sc'Curlfcy* 

I K iili iniiinfealix confr^t vildi sonrco for rmy 

ackiltiorai iniorbiation i»c ray oataiti r-agardinr; idxis ?n£4ttcr. 


A' 


* i* ^ ^ -V* 1 


bill contact approTrrlata sources ictdliar vdtb CO;.'/- 
activifcicfe to venitf validity o£ in:;orraa.tlon contaiir^d in lZ 
A-anaiaued by source. 


A* Isircau Ctnc* S){i%ii) 

(1 •” dlaral (inc, iKi“0 . 

d Pan I'iciio ( .11^, iKdi) , 

" - .., .. ; Z' 


\ jtv- » f i 


‘ H a 


I SEARCHED INDEXED ... .1 
SERIALIZED. iL 


MAR 1 6 1972 

— i.iirtuH 











\IKTEL 


DIFXCTOR, FBI 


hide: I 


Z/lS/12 


Re airtels ,to Bureau 2/25/72 and Z/1 


int ferv i at 

confidentially 


I contac ted and 

and 

Lowxn?^ xnrorination: 


and xs further deccribad 


H’eight 
Hair 
Eyes 

Scars and marics 
Past addresses 


2 - Bureau » 

1 HianiC80-1353) * 

2 - I I " 

LKLjmwC 

<S) / 




1 ARCHED 

I , :ALIZEDg^_ FiLEa 

\P4AR2J11972 . 







,pismpcr4$ri^ ;06ii|/Pnf ipn-i:-; .At 

tliat - s'Ae/.|fttroauG.e.,:^^^ i:o. 

iagattMpri-^ ' , -^id dnt J2Q.duc.f d" :hi|p, | 


, 1 ^ td,_ .iiet--;- 
I pIt% Jifewp. /-’ 


■ppiitd'c.' 


tiAs ?diadr;w^ii- tlia! t^pf - 'ijiddiAiddad^ •"; 







b7D 






X3 


lot of Strange fidends. 


II,. — „ 1. — j 1 

*4SiA«. 


LItU who is a :?urro i-!Xli=» ;qr>r>y>ovTrs^-t-al<tT 



She deGcribed the above nentioned individualc’ 
activities as follows? 


be 

b7C 

b7D 


Her belief is that they were writing letters to 
their personal friends advising thea tliat should they cojp.a 
to Miabii for the convention housing would be available. She 
stated thio housing was to be in tne apartnents and houses 
of other friends already living in the L'ianii area. She w’as 
also approached to let them utilize her apartment for lodging 
stjaca. 


She had typed a couple of letters- for the indivi- 
duals which began vi?ith ” Dear We have room for you 

to come and stay if you want to come to the national con- 
vention, and bring your friends.” The letters usually con- 
tinued with personal statements not related to the conven- 
tion, She never sav; a letter which contained any plcins for ^ 
violence, disruption, or civil disobedience. 

Although she only had a few contacts with the too 
individuals, they had told her the purpose of attendinn' the . 
convention was to "see x;hat*s going on,” She recalled they 
did have some discussions as to methods of reaching the 
convention site should the Miami Beach Police Department 
prohibit tnem from using the croGsviays, She explained that 
the crobsways (bridges) v?ere the only access to Miami Beach 
where the convention was to be held. It was decided -tliat 
should these crossxTays be blockaded they x-yould travel to the 
site utilizing boats. She could not recall any other planning 
which they discussed with her. 


3 - 



b7D 


Ghe s*featad in her opinion, the two individuals 

Tm ^“hrwm rtoiri rtT triri’f* o.v> H 4 ^rcs Ktt -n 

or purpose, but that they had sor.e weird friends neetiny 
at the apartnont v;ho she was unable to character'ize, 

She characterized! 

and gathered that he was doinp 

•unxngs wnicn ne was noT supposed to be* She further described 
him as havinf^ a paranoiac personality based on the fact that 
he continually "blows things out of proportion*" She recalls 
that while going out with him she would mention the two in- 
dividuals in her apartment building and he would let the word 
go around that he x?as investigating a dangerous Comunist 
group who was planning the destruction and disruption of the 
Democratic 'iational Convention and at times even mentioned 
bombing. As far as she knows the only information he has 
regarding the above individuals is that which she has given 
him and this information in no 'way involved violence or civil 
disturbances-. 


•with I 

She stated that should she 

learn of any information regarding the possibility of violence be 
during the Democratic National Convention she would immediately b7c 
notify the FBI Office I I b7D 


confidential basis 


- 4 - 




CJ»TIONAL FORM NO. JO 

MaV 1W2 KOJTJOM 

GSA 5PMR (41 CFr) I0I-I1.8 



-UNITED STATES G^SRNMENT 



Memorandum 


TO : 

DIRECTOR, FBI (62-112678.) 

date: 3/15/72 

FROM : 

SAC, DETPvOIT (100-36217) (P) 


subject; 

VJHITE PA>JT1ER PARTY (V?PP) 

IS - vTPP 

(00; DETROIT) 



Re 


■b7D 


For the in formation of Chicago and San Diego Divisions s 


a reliable source of 



be 


b 7 C 


b 7 D 




Chicago and San Diego are in possession of 5,nformation 
concerning \*??P which has previously been designated to all 
divisions. 


2 “A 


Bureau 


Chicago (RM) 

Miami (100-16553) (RM) 
(1 “ 80-13353-DEMG0N) 
2 «■ San Diego (RM) 

(1 - 80-CALREP) 

2 “ Detroit 
JRC:clc 




5010-1iC3>01 


■b 7 D 



I 



Bnj U.S. Savings Bonds Kegularly on the Payroll 


hfj 

■b7C 



DE lQO-36217 


I I rererence 

is made to the fact that the WPP has as their next major “target 
the 1972 Democratic Convention, where the WPP will be seen in 
"full force". 


source advxsed he b 7 c 

V7as %'riiling to cooperate w ith the Bureau concemi-ng the possible b?D 

utilization of |as a potential sour ce. He noted that 

he had been in recent telephonic contact with in the 

immediate past wherein i 


ntirxea. source note 
he was calling on that occasion because 


thxs occasion, source advi sed that if Bureau representatives 

still desired contact with] source could probably make 

necessary appropriate arrangements. 


Rererence to this possible San Diego activity has been 
previously designated. 


peqxiested to recontact jL 

to' capitalize on his offer of arranging a contact for 









DE 100-36217 


If this inte rview is arranged, 
requested to interviev; | | for any intormation he may 

possess on WPP involvement in demonstrations concerning the 
Democratic or P\.epublican National Conventions, 1972, 

^ should also 

attempt to obtain trom i any other pertipent information 

he may have concerning the VJPP and its personnel at Ann Arbor, 
Michigan, where he allegedly was in close contact with the 
WPP in the immediate past. 




I 


FD-36 (Rev. 5-22~64) 


F B I 

Date 


Transmit the following in 
Via 




3/20/72 


(TypeJ^ plaintext or code) 

NITE^i 

(Priority) 


TO : CHICAGO 

FROM : MIAMI (80- 13 53 ) 

MIDSM. (00: MIAMI) 

AT REGULAR VfESKLY PLANNING MEETING RE DEMOCRATIC 
CONVENTION, COLONEL MIAMI BEACH POLICE 

DEPARTMENT, ADVISED HIS DEPARTMENT VfAS INTERESTED 11^ 


OBTAINJ^G BACKGROUND DATA REGARDING ONE|^ C 

I FROM CHICAGO, A MEMBER OF THE GAY LI^RATION 


FRONT (GLF), FROM CHICAGO. 


SAID THAT AT A 


RECENT MEETING OF "OPERATION SNOWPLOW" IN MIAMI, ONE 
| 0F THE GAY ACTIVIST ALLIANCE, ADVISED 
THAT IorI is on HIS T/AY HERE, AND PLANS 


THAT OR IS ON HIS T/AY HERE, AND PLANS 

TO BRING MANY MKN MEMBERS OF THE GLF TO MIAMI TO DEMONSTRATE 
DURING THE CONVENTION. 

BY RETURN NITEL, CHICAGO REQUESTED FURNISH ANY 
AVAILABLE DATA RE I I OR 


2 - Miami 

(1 - 100-16573) (Op. Snowplow) 
JPM/dk 





Approve 




( 

0 


Sent ^ 

P M Per ' 

Special Ag 


Ch1 


/ ’ 

• U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1971— 4I3-13S 

^ f ^ d 



3/21/72 


AIRTEI* 


EROM; 


DIRECTOR, FBI 

SAC, MIAMI <80-1353) <P) 


SUBJECT: MIDEM 


,2/25/72 and 3/7/72 J 


In vi ew of i I reputation foy e xaggeration 

and coaments of I source in 

this matter to the effect knows of no plan for fiemonstration 
or organized activity in ccmnection with the Democratic National 
Convention, Miami feels n6 dissemination of this information is 
necessary and is taking no further action with respect to this. 



SeiV'"' 

Seri 



2 - Bureau <RM) 
D- Miami 
JCB/taw 

<3)V^w-' 


0 ' / 353 " /s ^ 





OPTIONAL FORM NO. 10 
MAY \99Z » 

G^^PMR (VfCFR) 101-11.6 

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

Memorandum 


TO :SAC , Miami 

FROM :Director, FBI 

SUBTEG TnVTTDEIl^ ^ 

"BuS; 3/24/72 



date: 3/14/72 

PERSONAL ATTENTION 



ReBuairtel to Albany, dated 1/19/72, captioned 
Demonstrations During the Democratic NationaL_Convention. '* 


In view of the fact that several groups have 
indicated plans to organize demonstrations during the 
Democratic National Convention, you are instructed to 
commence the preparation of summary letterhead memoranda 
incorporating in detail all information developed concerning 
possible demonstrations at the convention, as well as infor- 
mation relating to plans of individuals or groups to take 
part in the demonstrations. The first letterhead memorandum 
incorporating all previous information developed should reach 
the Bureau on or before Friday, March 24. 1972 . Bi-weekly 
memoranda are to be suomxtted thereafterV An origxhal and 
seven copies are to be submitted under the caption ’’Demon- 
strations at the Democratic National Convention, Miami Beach, 
Florida,” by cover airtel using the Midem caption. The 
memoranda are to be organized under appropriate substantive 
captions such as ’’Threats of Violence,” ’’Permits,” ’’Statements 
by Protest Leaders,” and so forth. The afore-mentioned 
captions are only suggestions and more appropriate ones may 
be used as the need arises. However, one specific caption, 
’’Possibility of Disturbances in the Ethnic Communities During 
the Convention,” should be included in the memoranda. 

As these memoranda will be disseminated at the 
Bureau and are the subject of intense interest to outside . 

agencies, they must be prepared in a clear, concise, readable, \ 
and professional manner. Any -administrative information should 
be submitted in the cover airtels. Of course, any information 
of an urgent nature should not be held for a bi-weekly summa ry 
but should be submitted by teletype or other more expeditiou s 
means as may be appropriate. 




Buy U.S. Savings Bonds Begularly on the Bay roll Savings 



Letter to Miami 
Re : Midem 

Buded ; 3/24/72 


Bear in mind that the Bureau must be able to answer 
inquiries from high Government officials concerning developments 
in Miami Beach and to do this, the Seat of Government must be 
knowledgeable concerning the day-to-day plans of individuals 
and groups planning demonstrations or other disruptions during 
the convention. 

In addition to the above, it is desired that by 
separate airtel you submit an outline of the steps you Have 
“Taken in preparation for the increased activity expected to" 
take_place in Miaini Reach this summer. Specifically, you 
should c omment on such items as the liaison you have develope d 
with other agencies, the re sults of surveys taKejn xnto areas 
rniere vxoien c e may be expected and where _ lookouts and special 
equipment may Be needed, es^mate'& of ^an-V-addi t lonaJL-TacJ bnical 
or communications egn-ip m^nt. that mi ght he n&ede d-,-_personnel 
jg eassignments tha t-bav-e— been^-jnade-on-are— con±.emp lat_ed to m eet 
th e increased demands during these demonstrations, a nd any 
other steps yo u have taken to meet the Bureau’s responsibilit y 
for cbverage~df~aSt ic ipat eT activity during the conventional 
You should spec ifically comment on the procedures that you 
h ave instituted t^assure that you are apprised of~~aTl activity 
o'jTdissidents aiad violence-prone groups between now and the 
time the convention commences. 

The results of thi s survey should also reach the 
Bureau bv the close of businesg7~~37^247 ^ - 2 , — Thereaft^, oh a 
continuiiag basis, you should advise by airtel of the steps 
that you are taking of an administrative nature to effect 
coverage of the demonstrations. 


should be“’ 
Division, 


This latter airtel sh ould he_captioned "Midem" and 
“axrected to the attention of the Domestic Intelligence 


I- 2 - 


SAC, 3SES7 YORK (100-168328) 


3/21/72 


SAC, MIAMI (100-4S4) <P) 


17AR TAX HESISTAHCS (m) 

IS - HEW EOT 
Bufile 100-457215 

WAR EESISTERS LSAOIHS <WRE) 

IS - HEW EOT 
Bufilo 27-3 

<00; HEW YORK) 

Re Hilwauk&e airtel to Bureau, 1/14/72. 

The referenced coamunleation concerned a 
national Resistors <k>nferenee held in Milwaukee 
January 7-9, 1972. On page 8 it was mentioned that the 
l^ssibility exists that a revolutionary or resurrection 
city would bo set up in Miami daring the Democratic 
Rational Convention and that future consideration should 
be given to having WlR people in this city to try and 
influence the other anti-war groups to get behind the 
War Tax Resistance. 


ESAD 


NSW YORK 


At New York, New York; 

Will ascertain and advise Miami if the captioned 
groups plan to be in Miami for the Demoeratic National 
Convention scheduled for July 9 through 14, 1972. 


2. - New York (RM) 

;2)« Miami <1 - 100-454) 
^ <£ - 80-1353) (MIDBM) 

JJM/taw 
( 4 ) 



VKt (UrlAC t-DKrrf NU. lU 
MAY 1902 COITION 


:^Ib 


GSA FPMf^(41 CFR) 101 .n.6 

UNITED STATES GoWrNMENT 

Memorandum 


TO 


FROM 



ALL AGENTS 


SAC, MIAMI (66-2782) 


date; 


3^1/72 




PROTECTION OF THE PRESIDHINT 
AND PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES 


The Bureau, by teletype March 20, 1972, advised 
as folloAvs: 

"U. S. Secret Service Headquarters, Washington, D. C., 
today advised that HUBERT H. HUMPHREY (Senator - Minnesota) , 
GEORGE S. MC GOVERN (Senator - South Dakota), EDMUND S. 

MUSKIE (Senator - Maine), HENRY M. JACKSON (Senator - Washing- 
ton), and GEORGE C. WALLACE (Former Governor of Alabama), are 
the presidential candidates whose protection is to be pro- 
vided by U. ?. Secret Service and which is effective 12:01 a.m., 
March 20, 1972." 

Since the majority of these candidates are members 
of Congress, you are reminded that to assault, attempt and/or 
conspire to kill, or kidnap, a member of Congress is a 
violation of the Congressional Assassination Statute,^ which 
is within our jurisdiction. Classification 89. Threats, as 
such, are not included in the Congressional Assassination 
Statute. 

When information concerning threats against any 
of these candidates are received, prompt notification must 
be made to the Bureau, the candidate's office, appropriate 
local authorities, and Secret Service locally and Washington, 

D. C. This action must be taken whether or not a violation 
over which we have jurisdiction exists. 

Follow-up LHM confirming oral notification of the 
threats must be promptly prepared and dissiminated to" the 
agencies involved. LHM should be furnished to the Bureau 
for dissemination at headquarters. 


1 - Each Agent 





MM 66-2782 


In those instances where the threat is clearly 
a violation of some other federal statute within our 
jurisdiction, investigation must be initiated immediately, 
as well as prompt notification concerning the threat tu 
those involved. 

In addition, you are reminded any request for 
manpower for protection of the Vice-President and other 
presidential candidates' are to be made by Secret Service 
Headquarters in Washington, to Bureau Headquarters. 




K8013 ;CG .corjir ■ ■ \ 

'84 1 P!^ N IT EL ' 3 - 2 1- 72 ' P’''P 
to ( 30- 135 3) . . 

FRO'M CHICAGO (100-5244 !) 


KIDEfE.,' 


RE MIAMI MITEL MARCH ‘ T.WENT V, ' -LAST. '• •- •• 'r 
C H.IC AGO .0 F F I C E ' I M 0 1 C E S . CO ST A.T f 'NO .1 D E MT i F I A-3 L E 


1 M FO RM at I O N CO M CE RN I M'G 




OR DERIVATION! 


T;H0S3 r!,AI'lES. , . sources. AND ' I NFORM-ANT S' HA VE FAILED. TO • / 
FAlRfJIS'H' ANY IWPORM'aTION CONCERNING THESE'* NAMES '6R'. . 
•INDIpATION 'ANYONE, ASSOC J at EC! VfITH G-AY' LIBERAT lOIl afl - ‘ 

■ • - /■ ' ■■ ■ 'Ei ' ' 

pH.IC'A.GO IS, OR HAS' CURRENT, PLANS' AS GRCi'Lf? TO PRO C'EE'D MIAMI.' 

'PEVIEH SUBJ0:CT' FILE' RE'GARY LIBERATION ACTIVITY ■ . '' 

CH.ICA'30. AREA FAILED TO 'REVEAL AMY .ACT I VIST' CHICAGO WITH ' ' 


SAMS' OR SIMILAR" NAMES. I 


(PROTECT) 


, , lOE.NT.IFICATJON 

.1 ■ ■■ ‘ 


'A MD ALL .EG ED ' A CT I V IT ' 


■'MID.EM IMPROBABLE; SITKOUT MO-RF> SPECIFIC I'OENT'lFiCAT lO'R 


SEARCHED____, iNCeCfO 

seriauzed^^filed...,:;;?^^ ■ 
,11972 / : 









''' DEMOCRATIC C^ENTION PLANNING SUMMARY, 17, 1972 

Colonel] [introduced Mr. Winston Wynne, Director of the State Beverage 

Department. 


OLD BUSINESS : 

1. Procedures in event of ^mass 
arrests, etc. 


REQUIRED ACTION OR ACTION TAKEN 


Pendi j 
Capt. 
Capt . 


be held w i th 
I and 


2. Arrest powers for Miami officers. Pending. P 

^ Public Defe 

conference. 

1 

3. Manpower, missions, etc. Major] 



1 Major 

tenaer, ec 

ITT schedu i 1 ng 


4. Ordinance package. 

5. Fingerprinting. 

6. Curfew ordinance. 

7. Uniform of the day.. 

8. Tactical training. 


9. Secret Service, Political 
candidates security. 


NEW BUSINESS : 

1. Photographic equipment. 


Communications (facsimile 
i nstruments ) . 


3. Rest break area 


Major I [reviewed with Planning 

personnel . 

Being finalized. Manual to be distri- 
buted along with information pac.kage, 
including responsibilities of Andy Frain 
Security, to all personnel.. be 

b7C 

Tn hp nrncp csed via Secret Service. 

I 1 reports no state has existing 

statute. He is drafting one. 

[ and Capt. ] [ researching. 

All uniform personnel to carry batons 
in retaining rings'. Helmets tenta- 
tively, depending on conditions. 

Capt. ] 1 to confer with Miami 

and PSD reference joint training, 

Maior l ] to initiate meeting 

with assigned plain-clothes officers 
aHer candidates selected." 


Six Sony video tape "Rover" rfecorders 
(reel type) and monitors on/brder by 
Miami Beach P.D. 

24 typewriter size telecopier 
instruments on order that will trans- 
mit fingerprints, photographs, etc. 
via phone to phone to and from all 
participatin^ag^ie^^^^ -/^ 

Will be avan^le at cafeteria and 
Scout facility. Ten chickees on 
order. Wa ter kegs, etc. 

] SEA.-.c,ia5 l.v I Jd b 7 c 









Intel 1 1 gence 


United Farm Workers 
Training 


Andy Frain Security Service. 


Meeting with judges. 


New Planning member. 


Vpyha l renorts by all agencies. 

Major ] requested copy of 

"Bust Book" . |_ I will attempt 

to provide. Six blacks attended Snow- 

plow meeting of 3/16/72, also Gay Lib 
Front {potentially militant), and Gay 
Activi tists alliance (non-miiitanti 
people, and 

Plan to attend San Diego Convention only 

/Miami P.D. preparing 35mm. sl ides for 
recognition classes. Captain^ 
to pursue reference joint participation 
FBI gathering pictures and informat/'/'n 
\on pertinent subjects. 

^ to provide Capt. l 

tor di stn oution , information reference 
Andy Frain personnel. Also previous 
convention time schedules. FYI see 
attached. 


edule meeting with 
etc. reference court 


ances during convention, etc. 

Assistant to Court Administrator 



to scl 

Judge 1 

1 


Senior Judge Wiseheart, will attend next planning session. 
Hand-outs: Literature reference Xerox telecopiers (Item #2) 

Those in attendance were: 


Beach Police Department 


Chief P 
Col one! 



Miami Police Department 


State Beveraqe Deoartment 



Florida Hiqhwav Patrol 


Department of Corrections & 


Public Safety Deoartment 



Federal Bureau of Investi 




States Attorneys Office 















Security Committee 


February 2, T972 


Comments : 

We fully realize that 5 hours per session is unlikely. That is why we have stated 
staggered assigning. This permits us to build our staff starting approximately 
21/2 hours before each session and peaking at 1 1/2 hours before scheduled session 
time. This gives us coverage when and where we need it and keeps costs in line. 

We also realize that with the exception of control personnel, security personnel 
and suoervision that a force reduction is possible as the session prooresses. 

Since there is no way of knowing the length of any session we are giving our best 
and most realistic estimate based on previous experience.* We will, however, be 
able to give running estimates to your designee so that these quoted costs remain 
reasonably accurate. 


*SESSI0NS 

1968 REPUBLICAN 

1968 DEMOCRATIC 

1st 

5 1/2 nours 

61/4 hours 

2nd 

6 hours 

7 1/2 hours 

3rd 

7 hours 

12 hours 

4th 

11 1/2 hours 

5 hours 

5th 

6 hours 



5/36 

7.2 nours 


4/30 3/4 

7.5 hours 




"-wyor dhoot tor viifoimant Kepon wi 

F1^306 (R«v. 9-30-69) 


Date prepared 


Date received 


Received from (name or symbol number) 


ok appropriate blocks) 


0 in person □ by telephone □ by mail ^ orally □ recording device □ written by Informant 


ii oraiiy tumished and reduced to writing by Agent: 
Date 


Dictated 


Transcribed 

Authenticated 

by Informant 


Brief description of activity or material 



ocated if not attached 


* INDIVIDUALS DESIGNATED BY AN ASTERISK (*) ONLY ATTENDED A MEETING AND DID NOT ACTIVELY PARTICIPATE. 
VIOLENCE OR REVOLUTIONARY ACTIVITIES WERE NOT DISCUSSED. 

I I Infonnation recorded on a card index by ! on date . 


Remarks: 




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3/14/72 


AIRTEL 

TO: DIRECTOR, EBI 

ATTENTION: RESEARCH SECTION 

DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE DIVISION 

FROM: SAC, MIAMI (80-1353) (P) 

RS: HIDEM 




ReBureau monograph entitled ’’New Left Underground 
Newspapers; The Tie That Binds", dated 2/18/72, 

As noted in this memorandum, underground news- 
papers in the United States proliferate. They also function 
as a communications tie between various areas of the country 
and enable "movement" people to stay abreast of issues of the 
moment. Additionally, they afford a semblance of unity of 
action to the movement, and by their method of reporting, 
undoubtedly suggest to many that they attempt activities 
similar to those reported. 

Of particular interest is the section under 
heading "Protest", on pages 23 to 27. As noted therein, in 
connection with the Mayday Demonstrations in Washington, D. C. 
in 1971, underground newspapers printed strategy and tactics 
to be used, as well as targets where demonstrations would 
take place, in an effort to "shut down the Government". 

This type of reporting undoubtedly added to the numbers of 
dissidents who proceeded to Washington for those demonstra- 
tions and provided some organization to these activities. 

With the approach of the Democratic and Republican 
National Conventions, in July and August, 1972, printed 
matter in the underground papers concerning planning sessions, 



3 - Bureau (RM) 

- San Diego (100- 
Miami 
KWW/dk 
(5) 


) (CALREP) (Info) (EM) , 







/0'/3s3-' 


MH 80-13^3 


protest activities, setting up resurrection typo cities, 
rociv festivals, pooxing ox auxomooixes xor xravei x-o 
convention sites, and other Itens having a direct bearing 
on security of the conventions, will undoubtedly increase 
in volume. It is felt this material should be read, sorted, 
and analyzed as quickly as possible, and furnished to the 
appropriate authorities, both at the Seat of Government and 
at the convention sites, in order that these authorities 
will have the benefit of this information on a timoly basis. 

Inasmuch as the Bureau’s Research Section regu- 
larly receives and analyzes material from all of these 
publications on a nation-wide basis, it is suggested: 

<1) The Bureau consider preparing a periodic memorandum 
for dissemination, containing information gleaned from under- 
ground press, solely with respect to pre-convention plans 
and activities of dissident groups and ’’movement’’ people. 

It is suggested such memoranda could be issued, 
at present, on a monthly basis, and as the conventions 
approach, on a more frequent basis. 

Since this information would be extracted from 
public source material, it is felt it could be readily dis- 
seminated to Secret Service and local law enforcement agencies 
directly responsible for convention security. 

<2) If this suggestion is adopted, the Bureau may wish 
to canvass all offices, instructing that they obtain and 
forward to the Research Section immediately upon publication, 
all underground newspapers in the United States by the most 
expeditious means, in order that the disseminated memoranda 
would be completely current. 


2 





UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 


FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 


DICLASSIFICATIOII AUTHORITY MKIVID FSOH: 

Miami, Florida fbi au-tohatic de'classificatioh cuidi 

March 20, .1972 oE-ii-zoiz _ 


c^P<5eotial 

RE; f4IAMI LIBERATION PROOT (MLF ) 

■ INTERNAL SECURITY - NEW LEFT 

DEMONSTRATION DURING 
DEMOCRATIC NATIOJAL CONVEI^TION 
MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA 
JULY, 1972 


on March 10, 1972, addressed a, group 
of some 100 at the University of 14iami, Coral’ Gables, Florida. 
His talk concerned’ the "Automated War" in 'Vietnam. | 
spoke for about 45 minutes using slides to illustrate his 
tallc. 


on February 18, 

1970, was found guilty of Anti-Riot Law . 
violations that arose from activities 
during the Democratic National Convention 
at Chicago, Illinois, in August, 1968. 

Pending an appeal, he was released on bond 
'by the United States Court of Appeals,. 

Chicago, Illinois. 

Vfliile at the UniversityJ who was accompanied 

by | I visited the University of Miami International 

Lounge and th e offic e of "The Hurricane", a n official ca mpus 

publication. was also accompanied by | Original 

plans called for him to address a group at Miami Dade Junior 
College in" the afternoon, tiis- late arrival resulted in that 
engagement being cancelled. 

Excluded fj::o!fs^utomat 

Dowilgradin^vand ■ 

^^^lassificatrian' -- 






■bo 

b7 

b7 




The Youth International Party, also 
known as Yippies, is a loosely knit, 
antiestablishment, revolutionary youth 
organization formed in New York City in 
January, 1968. 

The Student Mobilzation Committee 
to End the War in Vietnam (SMC) is con- 
trolled by the Socialist Workers Party 
(SWP) and its youth affiliate, Young 
Socialist Alliance. SMC initiates and 
supports public demonstrations against 
the war in Southeast Asia. 

The SWP has been designated pursuant 
to Executive Order 10450. 

As the youth organization of the 
Socialist Workers Party (SWP) , the Young 
Socialist Alliance (YSA) serves as the 
m.ain source of recruitment into that 
organization. The YSA is described in 
the masthead of its official publication, 
’’The Young Socialist Organizer”, as ”A 
multi-national revolutionary socialist 
youth organization,” 

In October, 1970, the Radical Action 
Coalition (RAC) received recognition as 
an approved organization at the University 
of South Florida (USF) , Tampa, Florida. 

RAC is made up of radical leftists and 
liberal peace groups at USF who want to 
build a movement in the Tampa Bay area. 





CONF^Sirf^IAL 


RE: MIAMI LIBERATION FRONT 


following his talk at the University of 
Miami, joined up-state members of the Florida Peoples 
Coalition (FPC) and members of the Miami Liberation Front 
(MLF) . The two groups met to resolve which would be the 
lead . organization for d emonstr ations during the National 
Democratic Convention. I 1 who suggested the FPC should 

be the directing organization, issued an ultimatum indicating 
if this was not agreeable, he would pull out and there would 
be no action during the convention. The MLF did not want to 
concede their authority fearing they would lose their 
identity.- The matter was not completely resolved and further 
meetings would be held on the matter. 


MM T-1: 


and 



I 1 and 



Representing the FPC were 

(last 

name unknown) 


from New York were also present. 


MM T-1 


The FCP is a state-wide organization 
established as a pressure group to demon- 
strate at the Democratic National Convention 
in Miami, Florida, during July, 1972. 


■MM T-1 


The MLF is a local coalition of students, 
women and young workers who share in a common 
opposition to'^'racism, sexism, and imperialism. 
This coalition is organizaed around the consensus 
that there must be co-ordinate non-violent 




■b6 

b7C 

b7D 




SZ^IAL 


GCSS 


RE: LIBERATION FRONT 




opposition and confrontation to the 
Democratic National Convention to be' 
held on Jliami Beach during July# 1972. 


. "The VJeather Report 
Volume 1, Number 2 
Published I'iLP 
March 3, 1972 

This dociment contains neither recommendations 
nor conclusions of the FBI, It is the property of the FBI 
and is loaned to your agency; it and its contents are not 
to be distributed outside your agency. 





1 







100-15700 


UNITED STATES DEPAETMENT OF JUSTICE 
FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 

Miami, Florida 
March 20, 1972 


Title 


MIAMI LIBERATION FRONT 


Character INTERNAL SECURITl '- NEW LEFT 

Reference Memorandum, dated and captioned 
as above, at Miami, Florida. 


All sources (except any listed helov) vhose identities 
are concealed in referenced communication have furnished reliable 
infoimation in the past. — i. 



This document 
of the FBI and 
your agency. 


contains neither recommendations nor conclus'loris' of the FBI. It Is the property 
is loaned to your agency; It and its contents are not to be distributed outside 




< 

... •• 

DICLASSIFICATIOH AUTHORITY DERIVED FRO 

DICLASSIFICATIOH GUIDE i 
iSR 02-14-E01Z " 


F B 1 


Date: 3/20/72 

Transmit the following in 



(Type in plaintext or code) 

vtr, AIRTEL 



(Priority) 


TO; DIRECTOR^ FBI 

FROM: SAC, MIAMI (100-15700) 

SUBJECT: MIAMI LIBERATION FRCKfT (MLF ) 

■ IS - NEW LEFT 

MIDEM 


ENCLOSURE 

Enclosed for the Bureau are 12 copies of an LHM 
concerning the Miami Liberation Front. Copies are furnished 
Tampa and Washington Field, Origin in matters mentioned 
therein. A copy of this memorandum is being disseminated 
locally to U.S. Secret Service, Miami, Florida. 


to SA 


MM T-1 is 


MM T-2 is 


SOURCES 

I who furnished the information 
I used to characterize 


Bureau (Enc. 12) (RM) 

(1 - MIDEM) 

Tampa (1 - 100- ) (MLF ) (Enc, 

(1 - 100-2945 ) (FPC ) 

(1 - 100- ) J) Sited 

(1 - 100- ) fiSu) 

(1 - 100 - ) ^ 

Washington Field (1 — 100-471721 (Enc, 


0- 80-1353) (MIDEM) (1 
Special Agent in Charge 



66-2586 ) 







MM 100-15700 


ADMINISTRATIVE 


The Miahii Liberation Front is a recently formed 
coalition of local activists who plan to co-ordinate 
demonstrations at the Democratic National Convention. 

A .letter on this matter is being submitted under separate 
cover to the Bureau. 


CLASSIFIGATIdT 


The LHM has been classified ' ‘ CuiifidenLial " in 
order to protect T-1. This soxirce is of continuing 
value and his identity, if disclosed, could detrimentally 
effect the national defense interests of the United States 





3/21/72 


20s MBECrOB, FBI (100-^167^^91) 

FEOMs SAC, Qm Dmm (lCC-16200) (P) 

a^SEF 


I Is 3Pstire5 FBI Ageist ssS. currently 

serving with a special IEA&. lask Force In Can Blego, 

California, on 3/20/72 sfivised as follows $ 


I I ioperlsl Comnnleations 

Coi^oration is division of ngn fiowell). Charter Oil 
Bnllding, Oan Blego, California,, recastly (asset date 
'mlmo'mj receiwed a long-distsascc t^ephone call fr<aa an 
tmknown Segro In Betrolt, Kichigsn* She caller wanted to 
purchase or lease 6C0 Bell and Eowell portahle telephones 
**fpr use in H lw and A ugust*^ telephone units sell for 
fSw*C0 each, I I said no lease or sales agreeaient 

was reached and, heeausc of the youat of non^ inrolred, 
he did not encourage the caller, I j was of the opinion 

the caller t^ght he using federal funds frorg suffsh agor tclp-a 
as the Office of Bconosic Opportunity (QhQ)» l I told 

the csller the mits arc not avaHahle in Cm PXego hut 
he did tsll hid th^y are ttsnufactured hy Bell and Howell 
at llalthaa, Massachusetts, 






lCO-16200 


33aasauch as -the caller Indicated the iinits voulA 
he utiysed in “ Angiist**, there is a possibill'^ 

Hits caller wat» rercrrlia^ i,v> tt. uuktuiUiiXcaLXMUi» itcLwwAo. JLu 

connection tfith the Beaocratic h'ational Commtton in Iliarai 
in dnly and the Hepnblican National Convention in Sen Diego 
in Angust, 1972* 

mm 



kT^mmmu MhrmmszimB . win contact appropriate 
representative for Bell and Dowell to determine if CJISUB 
caller from Detroit, Mchigan, has attempted to secnre the 
t^ephone units from the aanufactnrsr. Also attempt to 
id^tify DH0DB caller and the eventual us© and disposition 
of the portable telephone units* 

.and HIAKX (IMOmTIOH) 

information copy is being fumij^ed to Detroit 
as DHSDB caller said he is from that city. Information 
copy is furnished to Hiaai for K^BH. 




with 


AT 


DA 


Disgo* GAhlBOEirXA* Will maintain contact 
or any additional information h© might 


secure* Ban Diego docs not a nticipate coa tactiaa 
inasmudi as he is a source of [ ' 


b 

•b 



FD-350 (Rev. 7-16-63) 



' BY.ABQEijAFT 

Herald Rellalon Editor 

When, a delegate to the 
Demotnratic National 
Conv-ention checks into 
the Miami Beach Con- 
vention Hall for the first 
sessipn July 10, the guy 
'Checking his credentials 
and' showing him to a 
seat, may very ■vvell he a 
Miami clergyman. 

If. a ^‘Y-ippie’’ comes 
here to demonstrate, a 
young Christian, trained 
at “Explo. 72” may sit 
Idown to rap with him -in' 
the park, and. then, seek 
out,a clergyman standing; 
by tO' provide him with, a 
place to sleep and some-- 
thing) to eat. 

Those were some op 
the possibilities which: 
em er g e d from the' 
"awareness seminar” 
sponsored this week by, 
the Religious and Com- 
munity Leaders Com 
cerned with the Demo- 
cratic National Conven- 
tion. 

THE POSSIBI LITY of 
clergyinai ' ' ’’ serving as 



Roelty Poinerance! 

. ... peace- monitors? 

part of the security force 
handling the admittance 
to and traffic within the 
convention hall was 
raised by Wesely Ppmerv 
oy, dire(Jtor of safety and 
developmeift for the Uni- 
versity of Minnesdta. He 
has 'been involved in pre- 
paring local law enforce- 
ment officials and others 
for problenis that might 
crop up at the conven- 
tion. 

. The “one on one” pro- 
gram of Christian young, 
people and clergymen 
working^witn the “Yip- 


pies” n r.-,nti)er.. protesi 
groups was suggested by 
Miami Police- Chief Berr 
nard (Jarmire. He said he 
had been approached by 
leaders of “Explo" about 
carrying on Such a pro- 
gram and endorsed it as 
“perhaps the most help- 
ful thing” the religious 
community could do t6 
avoid the possibility of 
dny tragedy here such as 
happened during, the po^' 
iitical conventions ' of 
1968. '■ . ' 

Miami B.eacih Police 
Chief Rocky Pomerance 
suggested that churches 
might provide trained 
m arc h marshals or 
"peace m<3hitors” for 
demonstrations: which 

will be given offidal 
sanction. 

DADE Public Safety 
Director WilSon Piirdy 
asked for the help Of the 
religious leaders in over- 
coming fear in. the com- 
munity about what might 
happen- at the cOnven- 
tion. 

"God power is the only; 


(Indicate page, name of 
newspaper, city and state*} 


iO-B 


MIAMI HERALD 


MIAMI, FLORIDA 


Date: 3/11/72 


Title: democratic 
NATIONAL CONVENTION 

Character: 

or 

Classification: 80-1353 

Submitting Office: raAMI, FLA 

t i Being Investigated 


it,,"- f ^ 



^ \ 


( 


( 



Bedard Garmire 


real power;’*' Ke - said, 
“andit cdnovexcorne the ' 
fear some 'have of, the 
Gonventipn.” 

- A31 the police officials,, 
convention ■ chairman 
Richard Murphy,, aiid 
city fathers fexpressed: 
gratitude for" the interest 
of the religious .commu- 
nity ehd the willingness, 
of the clergy and lay 
'leaders to be ihyolved, 

THE REV. Jack Qassi- 
dy,‘ director of tJrban 
ministries for the United j 
Church of Christ in the | 
Mtiaini area and staff co- | 
ordinator for the; Inter- ^ 
Religious Coordinating, } 
Center established fay the. | 
committee of concerned ! 
for the convention, said j 
he ■was pleased that. ISO | 
persons registered at the j 
seminar. Two thirds of 
them volunteered theif 
services for any of the 
activities which might be 
considered helpful in 
keeping the community 


peaceful during the con- 
vention 'antt'Hr'assuring 
that every imeresied 
group will be heard. 

One of the functions of 
the center will be. to 
work with convention of- 
ficials- so that they get 
the opportunity to nieet 
with minority or special 
interest groups who- 
come here without 
knowledge of the legiti- 
mate ways to. get their 
Views, before the conven- 
tion, the Rew Mr, GassU 
dy explained. 

‘ THE CLERGY com- 
mittee also will provide 
chaplaincy services in a 
meditatioii room in the 
convention hall • itself,, 
and have representatives 
ih various areas through- | 
out the county to spot ' 
.problems related to the- 
'Convention, and takei.' 
steps to iron them out 
through the proper goV- 
ernmenfal and corh'Uiunir 
ty-agencies. . 

Everybody present 
I was. convinced that suck 
I prepara tjohs. wi ll avoid 
any serious coUfronta- 


■fiohs come July«-™~^ 

SEVERAL , hundred 
Miami tccncg'ers •’t® 
expected to be am on 
the 100)000 young- peopl 
who are planning to con- 
verge oh Dallas. June -12- 
17 for the International: 
Student Congress ori 
-Evangelism (Expld,’72). 

Une of the principal 
speakers- for the daily 
rallies in the Cotton 
Bowl will be Dr, Larry' 
Poland; pCesideht -of 
Miathi Christian Uhiver-r 
sity.. Other speakers will 
include Billy Graham ahd 
Bill Bright, president of 
the sponsoring Campus 
Crusade for Christ. 

Coordinator for Yxpld 
is 'Paul Eshieman, son o| 
the Rev^ Ira Eshlemai| 
Who founded BibletoWn 
•U.S.A,, in B'oca Raton. i 



OfnOHAl fOKM NO. 10 

MAY 1902 EDITION 

GSA ffMH (41 CFIU I0T-II.6 


UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

Memorandum 



date: 


3 / 22/72 



SA P ItQlophoned, 

Btating above informanil I 

I I ...pproval is presently 

pending at SOG to designate hin an approved PSI. He has 
so far furnished reliable information in the past. 

Informant states he is comim; un %vith information 


L I vias given the nane of SA | 1 

I for the informant to contact in the event of receip 

by him of urgent information, otherw ise. I Isa id 

he would completely debrief informant I 


relative 


rrad H laml indices negative 




(1 ~ 80 - 1333 ) 








UNITED STAtES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 
FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 

In Reply, Please Refer to 

File No. 100-16589 Miami, FloridA 


RE : GAY. ACTIVIST ALLIANCE 

INTERNAL SECURITY - NEW LEFT 

DEMONSTRATION AT THE 
DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION, 
MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA 
JULY, 1972 


predicat ion 

On February 17. 1972. 


Miami , telephon: cally 
ormation from an "under- 
cover agent" to the effect that a meeting for a group of 
homosexuals was recently held in Miami, at which time they 
discussed the possibility of committing violence at the 
Democratic National Co nvention to be held at Miami Beach, 
Florida in July, 1972 I b aid that the 

individuals pro sant at this niftoti ng were reportedly armed 
with handguns. [ declined at this time 

to identify his source but stated that he would attempt 
to obtain additional information. He said that this group 
which he identified as being the Gay Activist Alliance 
(GAA) is a branch of a New York organization of homosexuals 
and that the newly formed branch in Miami had already suc- 
ceeded in attracting ten members locally. 

By letter dated February 18, 1972, 
advised that the GAA meets on Mondays and Thursdays 









RE : GAY ACTIVIST ALLIANCE 


Examination of recorcfe of the Dade County Public 
Safety Department reflect a record dated September 8, 1970 




I Miami, a dvised that he xs personally 

acquainted with I ~l an a cknowled ged homosexual who 

is a member of the GAA, Reverend | said that the Metro- 

politan Community Church is a church frequented by homosexuals 
and that he himself is active in attempting, through legal 
channels, to obtain greater equality and rights for homosexuals 
He said tha t approximate ly a week previously he had a conver- 
sation with who inquired as to whether or not the 

Metropolitan Community Church would be willing to house members 
of the GAA who would be coming to Miami to be present at the 
time of the Demo cratic National Convention in July, 1972. 

[ said that it had come to his attention that 
several members of 1he GAA from New York had recently been in 
Miami to assist in organizing a local branch of the GAA. 

I said that during the course of his 
talks with I l as well as with the visitors from New 

York, and other members of the GAA, he had seen no evidence 
whatsoever that any form of violence is planned by the GAA 
for the convention. He expressed the opinion that any form 
of violence would be in direct conflict with the very nature 
of most homosexuals, who a re preaceful by nature and avoid 
violence. ! ( offered to make further inquiry 

in order to obtain more specific information concerning plans 
of the GAA for the convention. 


V iewed a t 


was inter 


nlified his orginal 







RE: GAY ACTIVIST ALLIANCE 


a cassette 


_ furnished a copy o 

recording'"^l"^irT!ntervTew"^Eliat he had had with , 

several days previously. A transcript of a portion of 
this tape relating to the GAA follows: 

"Gay Activists Associatio n which meets Monday^ 
Thursday « and Friday nights atf 


They're planning violent actions 
at the convention with firearms# I should say 12 
handguns, two automatic rifles, various kinds of 
mace which are very damaging to facial structures. 

Uh, there's approximately 60 - 80 members now, by 
convention time they expect 300 to 400 people. 

Uh, from 50 states there will be approximately 
24,000 people together in this association so they 
can be striving for their point for homosexual votes." 


I said that! 


He described 


as being a clever but devious 


character who has fiarnished "reliable information" to 

but who is also a "kook and nut". He expressed the opinion 
that 


3said that despite 


has 

furnished him with some reliable information which he then 
modified by stating th at at least a portion of the information 


furnished by 


would prove to be true . 


fcr' tr' tr' 






FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 


Date ot tfonscfiption 



I I who At 

the outset of the interviev? | | was infoanned by the 

interviewing Agents that it is a violation of Federal law 
to furnish false information knowingly to the Federal Goverraoent 
in an official investigation. 







whom he c 

ie scribe 


s aid that 1b is a friend of 
as I 




About 
attended 

a meetin g at| 

1 Th is meeting was held by the Gay Activist Alliance 

Cgaa) which said is composed of honKasescuals. About 

40 to 65 men were present. | | was in the apartment for 

no more than five minutes. He claimed that during this time 
he observed a collection of weapons on a table. These weapons 
included ten or twelve handguns* two rifles and four cans of 
mace, which he said had been placed there by some of those 
in attendance at the meeting. T'Jhile standing outside the 
apartment he overheard a man inside the apartment whom he 
described as being the President of the GAA from New York 
City, talk about sending representatives of the GAA to various 
colleges in order to determine their attitude toward the GAA. 


said that he saw a copy of the constSution 

of the GAA and that the Ninth Ataendment to this constitution 
ad'WDcated violence. 

He said that he also overheard various members present 


.Dale dictated^ 


Fhi<; i I'-umen! confntns necther recommendotions nor conclusions the F81. It is the property of Ihe FBI and is loaned fo your ogency; 
ii ond its contents nre not to be distributed outside your agency. 







m. 100-16589 


for iliaiTii Scach, in the Snnsfner of s Somaons stated that 

approximately 2,500 GASi members from Nev; Yorlc were expected 
to ®me to lHarai. He said that the GAA. members from New York 
City are promoting attendance at the convention. 


was unable to relate that any specific 
remarks had been made during this meeting v/here violence was 
advocated by the GAA during the convention but he assumed 
that this could have been so due to the presence of weapons 
and due to the violence advocated in the Ninth Amendment 
of the GAA constitution. 


He also claimed that he went past] 

on subsequent occasions v?heh meetings were being held there 
and saw a great many cars peurked there which lead him to 
believe that the size of the meetings had been increasing, 
however , he did not attend any subsequent meetings . 


1 said that he is now living 


his address because he did not want 
any time in the future. 


but he declined to furnish 
to be contacted there at 


! 

I 

I 

! 

! 


1 

! 

I 

j 


! 


5 ; 

i ( 



u 


■ I 


i , 
( • 


cr tr tr' 




RE: GAY ACTIVIST ALLIANCE 


was agin interviewed. 


said that subsequent to the first interview of March 6, 


Iconcerning 


1972# he had had a long talk with| 
the QAA and the f orthcoming Democratic National Convention. 

I emphatically denied that 


Jaid that[[ 


the GAA or any individuals that he himself is associated 
with have any intention what soever of eng aging in anv form 
of violence at the 


covention 


told 


that he, as a member of the GAA, is interested in developing 
only a service type organization and believes the GAA should 
obtain its goals by legal means. 


said that he himself has reliable 

contacts who are associated with the GAA and that he feels 
positive that the GAA intends no form of violence at the 
convention. He asserted that ha himself would be the first 
to publically denounce the GAA if he fotmd out that it did 
have any plans for violence . He reiterated that violence 
is abhorrent to the very nature of homosexuals, but that his 
Metropolitan Contraunity Church and other organizations with 
which homosexuals are affiliated are attempting, through 
peaceful and legal means, to obtain greater rights and 
recognition for homosexuals as individuals and citizens. 


■b6 


7 


b b 





FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATIO 




Dole oJ Ironscriplion 3 / 20^7-^ 


I was interviewed at his residence. 

tliti outset, of the int.er\'iew was given a "Waiver of Rights" 
form which he read and immediately signed, stating that he had 
no opposition whatsoever to being interviewed by the FBI. 


of the Gay Activist Alliance (6AA) in Miami. On or about 
February 4, 1972, a meeting of approximately eight individuals 
was held in his apartment. This meeting resulted from an appeal 
by the GAA in New York City to the Metropolitan Community Church 
for the purpose of organizing a chapter of the GAA in Miami. 
During this meeting discussions related to what the GAA is, its 
purposes and aims, and that the primary cause for its existence 
is "Gay Rights" • Those in attendance ware primarily of the 
college student category. 


[Stated that at no time at this or any other 

^testing held in his apartment woe any weapons in evidence or 
exhibited by any of those present. He asserted that at no time 
was the use of weapons discussed and that to do so would have 
been completely out of the question since neither he nor other 
raarafoers of the GAA have any intention whatsoever of engaging 
in any form of violence or to use weapons for any purjKJse . ■ 

He asserted that at no time was any form of violence 
advocated or suggested by any of those present at the February 4* 
1972,' meeting or at any meeting of the GAA. 


Inters iow<; 

r 


°'Mxauu., Fid." 

1 

Miami i00-“l%jb89 

b7C 



and 


Dfilft dictated 

SA 


GED i nmn; 

3/17/72 


fhi‘- j ' umeni coeloms nfiithei rctoinniendoHons nor conclusions of th*-* FBI. it is the property ol the FBI and Is loaned to your ogency; 
il unci Its contents ore not to be dislribwled outside your ogency. 




MH 100-16589 

2 . 


Ha ! 5 aJ .<3 -fclmt. there were three consecutive meetings 
heia and that approximately 20 was the greatest ntraber that 
had attended any of these meetings « The GAA in Miami now has 
approximately 13 members. At no time were more than that 
ever present. be 

b7 

I Stated that the Gi'sA is deeply concerned b7 

about obtaining "Gay" rights through legal channels. He^ 
asserted that it is absolutely untrue that any form of violence 
is advocated or intended by the GAA with which he is associated. 

i4r. SPAWN produced a copy of the "Constitution and. 
Bylaws of the Gay Activists Alliance", the pertinent portions 
of which are set forth below s 

" PREAt4BLEi 

"Vffi AS LIBERATED H0>K) SEXUAL ACTIVISTS demand the 
freedom for expression of our dignity and value as human 
beings through confrontation with and disarmament of 
all mechanisms which justly inhibit uss economic, 
social, and political. Before the public conscience, 
we demand an insnediate end to all opression of homosexuals 
and the immediate unconditional recognition of these basic 
rights s 

"THE RIGHT TO OUR FEELINGS, This is the right 
to feel attracted to the beauty of metiers of our own sex 
and to embrace those flings as truly our own, free from 
any question or challenge whatsoever by any other person, 
institution, or 'moral authority.' 

"THE RIGHT IX) IX3VE. This is the right to express 
out feelings in action, the right to make love with 
anyone, anyv^ay, anytime, provided only that such action 
be freely chosen by the individuals concerned. 

"THE RIGHT TO OUR OVffiT BODIES. This is the right 
to treat and express our tK;>dios as we will, to nurture. 


MM 100-16589 
3. 


display, and evisbellish them S9l«ly in the manner we 
otirselves determine independent of any external control 
whatsoever » 

"THE RIGHT TO BE PERSONS. This is the right freely 
express our own individuality under the goeyernance of 
laws justly made and executed, and to be the bearers of 
social and political rights which are guaranteed by the 
Constitution of the United States and the Bill of Rights, 
enjoined upon all legislative bodies and courts, and 
grounded in the fact of our common humanity. 

•'TO secnire tlrae rights, we hereby institute the 
GAY ACTIVISTS ALLIANCE, which shall be completely and soley 
dedicated to their implementation and maintenance, repudi- 
ating, at the same time, violence (Except for the right 
of self-defense) as unworthy of social protest, disdaining 
all ideologies whether political or social, and fore- 
bearing alliance with any group except for those whose 
concrete actions are likewise so specifically dedicated. 

"It is finally to the imagination of oppressed homo- 
secuals themselves that V7e commend the consideration of 
these rights, upon whose actions ala® depends all hope 
for the prospect of their lasting procurement. 

“ BY-LAWS 

”Ax*ticle I, The Gay Activists Alliance will not endorse, 
ally v^ith, or otherwise support any political party, 
candidate for public office, and/or any organiaation 
not directly related to the homosexual cause. The 
Gay Activists Alliance will not align itself v/ith 
any organization that advocates the use of violence 
(except in self-defense)." 



MM 100-X6589 

pointed out that tliQ constitution of the 
Gjyv does not have a Ninth Amendment and he reiterated that 
the constitution most certainly does not advocate violence • 

The following description was obtained through inter 
view and observations 


Names 

Date of Birth: 
Place of Births 

g 


Weights 

Hairs 

Eyess 

Marital Status 
Residences 



cr 




REs GAY ACTIVIST ALLIANCE 


This document contains neither recommendations 
nor conclusions of the FBI. It is the property of the FBI 
and is loaned to your agency; it and its contents are not 
to be distributed outside yoxur agency. 



0IRBC1?02# FSX 


3/a2/72 


mmm <ioo-»i6SS9) cc) 


seciiri^* * m? i^ef? 

DOTlTSf EaSXOlT Tm 

mrm umcn^ ^mmi 

4IEiT, l^7S 


SaclQsea iior tlte Btsre«ixi are 10 eopiee im HEI 
Qatecl ana captioned as alaove# one copy is laeino firenisljcd 
to the S* Secret Service, tilmii* Xhm iaiormtioa con- 
tained in i&m MM %?iil bo made availa^rle by this office to 
the Hiami Beach PB* One csop^ is being iarnislicd Mew Jorh 
for infosmtioa p«Eposes because of references mde to 
representatives of the Qm from Umr iforh City. 



a 

1 


Bureau CCno. IB) (iii) 


l?cw yorh (Enc* 1) (BH) 
Jliegsai 

(2^- 100-10530) 
il - 05-13S3) 
a - 157-SSS) 

CBDinam' 




/£?-/a53'/^c:> 



✓ 



AIL lUFOEHATIOH COilTAIHED 


MEIIU IS niCLASSIFIED 
DMI 02^16^2012 BY 60322 


UC/L 





3/23/72 


1 

AIRTSIi 


TO; BIRECTOR, 

FROM; 0AC, MIAMI (lOO-HSW) (P> 


SBBJHJT; WORKERS ACIPIOK H07EMSNT . , 

IS BEP ^ 

<00 ; KEf YORK) 


Re New York air tel and IHM dated 3/10/72, stating 
among other things WAM will organize activities at this 
suiasier^s Bemocratic and Republican National Conventions. 


b7D 


Re report of 


New York and Washington Field requested to closely 
follow and promptly report plans of this organization as they 
raaterialize with respect to MIDEM and CAIRBP. 

New York please furnish thumbnail sketch which 
will be used to describe WAM. 


2 - Bureau (EM) 

2 - New York <100-175441) 

1 - San Diego (100- ) 

2 - Washington Field (RM) 
, 2 *- Miami 

<1 - 100-NEW> 
iX - 80-1353) <HIDEM) 
HRA:mel 
(9) 



(RM) 

(CAERSP) <RM) (Info) 



&*' C5* 




3/23/72 


AIRTEL 


FROM; 


DIRECTOR, FBI (Attention: Domestic Intelligence 

Division) 

SAC, MIAMI <80-1353) (P> 


SUBJECT; MIDEM 


Enclosed for the Bureau are 13 photographs of the 
Miami Beach, Florida Convention Hall and surrounding area 
taken in connection -with a survey for a secure photographic 
lookout to be used during the Democratic Convention in July. 
Photographs are numbered 1 thirough 13 on the reverse side. 



The results of the Miami Office survey are as follot?s: 



reau (RM) (Ene. 13) 
ami 




3/23/72 


AIETSI. 




DIRECTOR, EBI 

(ATTEHTIOH: DOMESTIC IHTEIuLlGEKCE DIVISION) 

SAC, MIAMI (80-1353) <P) 


SUBJECT; MIDSM 


Re Bureau letter to Miami, 3/14/72, 

There follows a summary of preparations of the 
Miami Office for the Democratic Rational Convention (DNC), 
to fee held in Miami Beach, Florida, July 9 - 14, 1972: 

CORVERTION SITS 

The 1972 DRC will be held from July 9- 14, 1972, 
at the Miami Beach Convention £^11, located in the central 
area of Miami Beach. The regular convention sessions are 
scheduled from 7:00 P.M, to midnight, but it is anticipated 
that unscheduled afternoon sessions will also fee held. ^ 

The convention director is l ^ I The 

National Convention Headquarters has been opened in the 
Washington Federal Savings and I^an Association Building, 
located behind the convention hall. Approximately one month 
before the convention opens, this headquarters will foe moved 
to the Fontainebleau Hotel, 

The convention hall complex, which includes the 
Miami Beach Auditorium and other smaller buildings, is bounded 
by Washington Avenue on the east. Meridian Coia^t on the west, 
Collins Canal on the north, and 17th Street on the sooth. 


3 - Bureau (Enc. 1) (AMSD-HM) 1 
(2^ Miami 
g5#/JCB/mel ^ 

( 6 ) M 


San Diego ( 100- 
(Info) (RM) 


) (CALREP) 


^0 ^/3S3 - S 



m S0-13S3 


entire area is to be surrounded by a O’ chaiii-»ii|ik 
fence during the convention. A chart of the convention haXX 
co 2 ! 5 >les is oaeXosed for Bureau’s perusal. 

LIAISO N WITH OTHER AG33NCIHS 


Miami Office established liaison wita iuv? ft/llcring 
federal and local agencies in preparation for the eoavontion: 

Miami Beach Police Bopartment <HBPD) 

Miami Police Department 
Dade County Department of Public Safety 
Plorida Highway Patrol 
Piorida State Beverage Department 
Florida State Attorney’s Office 
D. S. Secret Service 

Close liaison with these agencies has been effected 
through a series of weekly planning sessions held at the 
Miami Baach convention center, at which the Miami Office has 
been represented. These sessions, held each Priday, are 
conducted by Miami Beach Police Chief BOCKS’ POMBBANCS. All 
phases of planning with regard to security and protective 
responsibilities are discussed. All possibilities are 
considered concerning problesas which might be encountered, 
and methods of precluding or minimizing those problems. 

COMMUNICATIONS 

In the southwest corner of the basement of the 
convention complex, the MBPS has designated a large room 
to bo used as a Coamand Post. In this room will be located 
the main communications center, through which constant contact 
will be maintained with various patrols and guards, inside 
and outside the complex, the convention floor itself, and 
with police headquarters. Adjacent to the communications 
center, areas have been partitioned off for use of other 
official support agencies, including the PBI and Secret 
Service, 

The enclosed chart of the convention complex contains 
a number of stations designated by red numerals where tele-- 
phone receivers and transmitters are located throughout the 
complex, which are connected directly to the main communications 
center. 




m 8Q-1353 


IBI Desk will bo aaimoa by two Special Agoats 
on 12-ho«r shifts, which will conform with the shifts of 
tho local police and other agencies. Ifhese shifts ran froa 
iusou k,m» tc P*M., When peak activity is expected, 

and from lOjOQ P.H* to lOjOC A.a. During th-? shift 

the IBI Desk will be staffed by the Security Supervisor ana 
the Extremist Supervisor. During the second shift it will 
be aaaned by another Supervisor and an Agent. — 

Equipment within the EBl Coaaand Post area will 
consist of a desk and several chairs, a set tuned for 
convention coverage, a portable radio transaitter, two 
telephones, and two miniaturized radio transceivers. One of 
the telephones furnished will be a direct line to the Miami 
fBl Office. The portable radio will be In constant contact 
with the Miami Office, the PBI photographic site, and with 
Special Agents on the street cov^ing the deaonsta^tion area. 

Additionally, the Miami Beach Police Department 
has secured a ntmber of Kerox telecopiers, and is furnishing 
two of these units to each agency for use during the convention. 
It is anticipated one of these units will toe maintained at 
the Command Post and the other will be at the Miami Office. 
These units operate on a regular telephone circuit, and can 
be used, if necessary, for the rapid transmission of photo- 
graph, fingerprints, and other docments. 

SECURITY RESPQHSlBXbm 

Security of the convention hall complex and surround- 
ing area Is the responsibility of the ^PD, with Chief BOCSY 
POMERAHCE in charge. During the convention and two weeks 
prior thereto, other police agencies, including the Miami 
Police Department, Dade County Public Safety Department, 

Florida Highway Patrol, and Florida State Beverage Department, 
will provide sufficient manpower to MBPD to enable this agency 
to handle its responsibilities. 

Daring the convention sessions, the MBPD will 
assume responsibility for the fenced area to the north and 
the area to the east of the convention hall, where most of 
the protest activity is expected to occur. Miami Fblice 
Department will man the fenced areas to the south and westj 


*» 3 — 


MM 80-1353 


officers of tiia Da8e County Dopartmont of Public Safety 
’Will bo used as a backup force inside the fenced area in 
th3 event they are seeded; and officers of the Florida 
Highway Patrol will be paired with local police for patrols 

A ’I If 4 m4 Tl T H'*Si ^nkYt 


12-hour shifts during the eonvostion. 


The ’*sergeant-at-arias**^ responsibility inside the 
convention hall itself will be assumed by the Andy Frain 
Agency, a private security service which has been deputized 
by the Democratic national Cosamittoo for this purpose. l?hls 
agency will be responsible for administrative policies 
effected within the convention hall, in an effort to avoid 
disruption of the convention proceedings* Its responsibility 
is to maintain sufficient order to permit a smooth operation 
of convention business, as opposed to actual physical pro- 
tection of the promises and other routine police functions. 
Any arrests inside the convention hall during the convention 
will bo effected by local police only upon the execution of 
an affidavit by an Andy Frain representative. J 


PBOTSCTIVS ASSX€HM3S!NTS 


H. S. Secret Service has advised that this agency 
assumed responsibility on March 20, 1972, for protection 
of the following five Democratic candidates. The hotel 
following each name below is the one at which the candidate 
ims indicated he will be staying in Miami; 

Senator HOBEST H. HOMPHESf , Carillon Hotel 
Senator EDMUIfD S. MOSKIB, Americana Hotel be 

Senator GBOEGB MG GOVEBH, Doral Beach Hotel b7c 

Governor GBOHGE WAIAACE, DuPont Plaza Hotel 
Senator HBHEY 4ACES0H, Montmartre Hotel 


Bureau will recall that during the 1968 convention 
the three Florida FBI offices supplied men to assist Secret 
in protective assignments. Secret Service Agent 
I who will bo in charge of this detail, has 
indicated be feels no such assistance will be reqtui^®<i from 
the FBI daring the 1972 Democratic Convention, as the Treasury 
Bspartaent is furnishing sufficient manpower for this purpose. 


POLICE TMINIHG 


m GO- 1353 


Grants o£ approsiaatoly $400^000 hav^ boen received 
frea hSAA by Miami Beacb £ov preparation, research, training, 
oquipsaent, and the necessary sorvicos in connection with the 
wwwvcntian. * +v>nininst Drogram of approximately 100 hours 
duration for all police personnox assigaed Iw 
is in progress at Florida International Un iversity (Fltl), 
Miami. This program is under direction oil I 


A major portion of this training is being devoted 
to Behavioral Sciences, Psychology of Political Dissidents, 
and Humane Crowd Control, The main purpose of this training 
is to teach methods of coping with potential disorder without 
violent confrontation. Part of this training ^‘Sensitivity 
Sassions’* is being held, at which leaders of local dissident 
groups are invited for "‘nock confrontations'* with the police 
and for discussions as to methods of avoiding violence. 

Chief POMSE&KC25 has continually emphasised that 
his directives will bo “effective but hmaane“ In controlling 
the masses of protesters, and although the police will us© 
wimtover defensive measures are necessai’y, their emphasis 
will be on maintaining a peaceful convention. 

PSaseSHSL ASSlGmiSNTS 


In absence of any violent activity, convention will 
be handled by the two squads handling security and extremist 
matters in the Miami Office, without tho necessity for 
roassignment of Agents from other squads . Annual Laavo for 
Miami Office Agents is not being approved during tho weak 
of the convention, except under unusual circumstances which 
might work a hardship on the Agent. Since we will thus have 
a fall complement of Agents, we will be in a position to 
util^e Agents from other squads for any necessary last minute 
reassignments . 

SURVEIIIANCB OP AEMS ?/HgRE VIOLBNCB CAH BE AMTICIPAT^ 

The only area where violence can be anticipated as 
a result of possible confrontation, is the north area, 
directly in front of the convention hail. This has boon 
divided into two areas, separated by the entrance gate. 

These areas have been specifically designated by the police 


mf 80-1353 


for aemonstratioa purposes « Eesults of a coaploto survey 
of this area, iacludiJig photographs of possible look-out 
sites aad of the doaoustration areas, have baea subaitted 
date by separate airtel. 

PHOTOGS&PHIC INSTAHT RECOGKITIQh CI^ASCHS 


la the receat past, Miaai Police Department has had 
effective results from a series of classes for its officers 
regarding recognition of known criminals, such as burglars 
and dope pushers. I'hose classes consist of the repeated showing 
of 35 mm slides, depictibg a certain Individual, until the 
officers are thoroughly familiar with them* 

In connection with the convention coverage, it is 
felt the ability by patroling officers to recognise known 
leaders and agitators would be highly advantageous, and Miami 
Office is presently cooperating with the Miami Police Department 
in preparing slides for these classes. We are In the process 
of furnishing photographs of loading national leaders and 
key activists to the Miami Police Department, who will convert 
them to slides to be used in this class, Miami Police Depart- 
ment has also agreed, at our suggestion, to include the Bursau*s 
'‘Weatherman’* subjects in these slides. 

TSCHHICAD l^DIPMBST HBEDBD 

Coamunications Htiuipment 

The Miami Office presently has six Kelcom Trans- 
ceivers with charging equipment. We have on order from the 
laboratory six GE PK-33 Transceivers. We would like the 
lab to ensure that these latter transceivers with appropriate 
recharge equipment will be seat to us before convention time. 

In addition, the Laboratory is requested to send 
one GE Master Executive (Suitcase) 30-watt radio unit, for 
use during the convention. This unit will be needed for 
a possible look-out which we may obtain in the area of the 
demonstration site. Although we presently have two of these 
units, one is kept in reserve specifically for use in aircraft 
hijackings. The other will be used at the 5BI Command Post. 


<r 


f- 




m 80-1353 


Photographic Squtpaeat 

In the event a photographic lookout id used, the 
Miami Office will have most of the eaaipaent noaded for 

IS ill bo nscossary: 

<1) The Singer Sight Photographic System 

<2) Additional 250 exposure cassette for the 
Topcoa Camera 

(3) A 1,000 am lens with tele-extension 

(4) The Hulcher 70 am camera with lenses 

(5) Teleconverter for the Bolleau 16 mm movie 
camera, to permit utilization of Topcoa lenses 

Additionally, in the event g photographic lookout 
is used^ it is requested that prior to the convention someone 
from the photographic Section be sent to Miami to instruct 
Miami Agents In the use of the Singer Night Photographic 
System, 

STEPS TAKSN TO ASSUBS APVAHCS KHONI«32)GE OP PROTEST ACTIVITIES 


All Offices have been advised to alert informants 
and sources concerning planned activities in connection with 
the convention. These offices have been instructed to 
immediately furnish Miami and the Bureau in a fora suitable 
for dissemination, all information with respect to possible 
disruptive activities . 


The Bureau Research Section Ms been requested to 
consid<n? preparation of monthly or bi-weekly nomorandum 
reporting and analyzing information appearing in various 
underground newspapers throughout the country with regard 
to plans by dissident groups and individuals with respect to 
the Doaoeratic and Republican National Conventions. 


Iiocally# 
New lieft activity 


who is knowle dgeable of all 
n the greyer Miami area,| 


b6 

■b7C 

:b7D 

b7E 


- 7 - 




m 80-1353 


The ai*P is in tlie process of establishing itsoix as tae 
local activist organizatioa through which out-of-city groups 
should coordinate thoir activities in connection with the 
convenrxoa. 

Miami Office is continuing to worit closely with 
the Miami Beach Police Department and other agencies in the 
advanced planning for the DKC, and Bxareau will bo kept advised 
of stops being taken of an administrative nature to fulfill 
our responsibility. 



FD ^342 (Rev.rl- 26 -^ 54 ^ 

United States DepHRient of Justice 
Federal Bureau of Investigation 






X — United States Secaret Seanrice# 
iHamir FXorida 


xmmmmBmxmB m tbb 
mmocmmxa mmxcmmi 
QcmEmxmu mmi bebch » 


Dear Sir: 

For your information, I am enclosing communications 
which may be of interest to you. 

Very truly yours. 


Enc.X 




V 

80-1353 
sXi - 66-2586 


GFC/gtj 

(I) 


raaij:3SS?H w* 

Special Agent in Charge 



(Upon removal of classified enclosures. If any, this transmittal form becomes 
UNCLASSIFIED.) 



Declassification authomty derived feoh: 

FBI AUTOHA^I DECLASSIFICATION GUIDE 

DATE 0Z^14iHPlZ 


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 


FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 


Miami, Florida 
March 23, 1972 


RE: DEMONSTRATIONS AT THE DEMOCRATIC 

NATIONAL CONVENTION, MIAMI BEACH, 
FLORIDA 


I. ORGANIZATIONS PLANNING PROTEST DEMONSTRATIONS 

A, PEOPLE’S COALITION FOR PEACE AND 
JUSTICE (PCPJ) 

. The PCPJ is self described as an organization 
consisting of over 100 organizations using 
massive civil disobedience to combat v/ar, radism, 
poveirty and repression. Its National Office is 
located at Room 527, 156 5th Avenue, New York 
City. 

The PCPJ held a press fconference in the first floor 
auditorium at 345 East 46th Street, Ne^v York City, on 
January 27, 1972, between 11:10 and 11:50 A.M. Approximately 
25 persons attended. Speeches v/ere made by representatives 
of various organizations within the PCPJ. An announcement was 
made regarding future "actions'-’ planned by "peace forces" in 
the continuing struggle for peace. Included in these "actions" 
was the following: 

July and August, 1972, demonstrations will take place 
at the Democratic Party National Convention, Miami, Florida, 
and the Republican Party National Convention, San Diego, 
California. 

• MM T-1 and observation by 
Special Agents of the FBI 
January 27, 1972 












RE; 'DEMOGRiTIC' NATIOjEiAL CONVENTION 


B. YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY (YIP) 

The YIP, also knovm as Yippies, is a loosely 
knit, anti-establistnuent , revolutionary youtlr 
organization formed in New York City in 
January, 1968. 

The Zeigtgeist International Party . (Zippies) , 
political wing of the YIP, has circulated a pamphlet stating 
that they v/ill nominate a "Rock" (referring to mineral matter) 
for president, with each state to hold a convention to decide 
the favorite Rock candidate to attend the Zippie convention in 
Miami, Florida, in time to coincide with the Democratic 
National Convention during July, 1972. 

MM T"2 


JERRY RUBIN held a press conference on February 16, i 
' 1972, in front of the Miami Beach Convention Hall, the site of / 
the forthcoming National Convention, i 

mm T-8 . 


] JERRY CLYDE RUBIN, on February IS, I 9 I 7 O, was 
■ ‘ found guilty of Anti-Riot Law violations that 
arose from activities during the\ Democratic 
National Convention, Chicago, Ill^inois, August, 
1968. Pending an appeal, he was released on 
bond by the U, S. Court of Appeals, Chicago. 

RUBIN, during’ the press conference, stated that he 
knew people in Miami who had planned demonstrations during the 
Democratic National Convention in July, 1972. He remarked that 
everyone probably remembered what happened foui’ years ago and 
that he thought that the Yippies, along v;ith the people in the 
streets, defeated the Democratic Party and that Yippies from 
all over the country would be coming to Miami. 

There will be 10,000 Yippies marching naked in front 
of the convention hall... there is going to be marijuana smoked 



J 




t 



RE: DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION 


everyv/here. . .they will not tolerate the nomination of 
HUMPHREY, MUSKIE, JACKSON or WALLACE. 

RUBIN said he hopes it’s peaceful. There will be 
no point for violence. He heard the police are taking 
sensitivity training classes and that is good. It was the 
police who made it violent in Chicago. If there is any 
violence, it will cost the Democrats the election. RUBIN 
said they are coming in numbers to make their presence felt 
and express themselves and if the police attack or do not 
give a permit, then all the bombs are their responsibility. 

RUBIN was asked concerning Chief of Police (Miami 
Beach) POMERANCE’s statement that the minute they break the 
lav; they will be throv/n in jail. RUBIN responded by saying 
the moment he breaks the law, v;e’ll throw him in jail. He’ll 
be the lawbreaker not us... he ’ll have the heaviest artillery 
but we’ll have moral, spiritual pov;er on our side. 

RUBIN stated they v;ere planning a nonviolent 
celebration. . .the Democrats paid a big price in 1968... they 
don’t v;ant to repay the price in 1972... they do pot want 
violence. . .they can avoid this by giving us march permits and 
a place to assemble. 

RUBIN stated there will be enough food for everyone, 
housing and dope... we hope the person the Democrats nominate 
for president comes out on to this lawn and gets stoned with 
us .. .everyone smokes dope now... the delegates will be smoking 
dope... some of the candidates smoke dope. Check out the odor 
in the smoke-filled rooms, ■ 

RUBIN remarked that his base of operations will be 
Miami Beach, Florida, but admitted he does not have an office 
as yeto 


V/hen questioned concerning ’Chief of Police POMERANCE’s 
statement that they would go to jail if they break the law, RUBIN 
responded by stating Mayor DALEY (Chicago, Illinois) said that 
and was very foolish. POMERANCE does not want to be another 
Mayor DALEY. 




RE: DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION 


STU ALBERT also spoke and remarked that an attempt 
■woxild be made to bring as many people as possible to Miami to 
force the Democratic Party to set a date when the war in 
Vietnam would end. 


Captain I | 

Miami 

Beach Police 
Department 
February 17, 1972 

STEWART ALBERT is a longtime activist and 
associate of JERRY RUBIN, 

C.= FLORIDA PEOPLE *S PLATFORM COALITION 
FPPC) 

FPPC is a loose confederation of radical groups which 
is being formed to plan for demonstrations during the Democratic 
National Convention, 

The FPPC will sponsor two days of nonviolent protests 
in Miami Beach during the July Democratic National Convention, 
The primary focus of this strategy will be to move the issue of 
the war and the need for total withdrawal from Vietnam back into 
the campaign. The FPPC was described as ”anti-sexist , anti- 
racist and anti- imperialist". 

Issue of the "Miami 
News", a daily Miami, 
Florida, newspaper 
February 23, 1972 


I Iwill leave New York City on 

February 25, 1972, to travel to Tampa, Florida, for the purpose 
of meeting v/ith members of a once-active May Day Collective 
from throughout the Southeast United States, The meeting will 
be to make plans for demonstrations by peace groux>s at the 
Democratic National Convention in Miami, 

is a member' of the People’s 

Coalition for Peace and Justice, who is 

V 4, . 


confiottial 





RE: DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION 



active in Election Year Strategy Information 
Center . 


The People’s Coalition for Peace and Justice 
(PCPJ) has described itself as being 
headquartered at 1029 Vermont Avenue, N.W. , 
Washington, D. C. , and as consisting of over 
100 organizations v/hich are using massive 
civil disobedience to combat racism, poverty, 
repression and war. 


The Election Year Strategy Information Center 
(EYSIC) v/as set up by members' of PCPJ and the 
May Day Collective (MDC) to coordinate New Left 
movement activities throughout the United States 
to culminate with demonstrations at the Republican 
National Convention, San Diego, California, 


May Day Collective (MDC) is self described as a 
multi-issue organization which formed as a result 
of the May, 1971, activities in Washington, D, C. 


The EYSIC has connections with the FPPC which has 
rented Post Office Box 17521 in Tampa, 33612, lor purposes of 
receiving correspondence from O'ther groups which will take part 
in the Democratic National Convention, 


MM T-4 


-b7D 

_J 


On February 26 and 27, 1972, the FPPC held a meeting 
in Tampa, Florida, Main points made at the session on 
February 26, 1972^, v/ere that the FPPC was not going to act as 
grand master of the demonstrations at the Democratic National 
Convention, but only as a guiding force to get the demonstrations 
moving. It was made clear that although plans call for acts of 
nonviolent civil disobedience, if any group or organization 
decided to go further, no attempt would be made by the FPPC 
to stop them. Marshals for the mass demonstrations are to be 
supplied by the Vietnam Veterans Against the War (WAW), A 





RE: DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION 


group of doctors and lawyers in the Miami area are being 
formed to furnish legal and medical assistance to the 
deiuons tra,tors under the name ”Opex*ation Suowplow”. 


MM T-5 


The Vietnam Veterans Against the War (VVAW) 
is a national veterans organization with a 
national office located at 25 West 26th 
Street, New York City, Its first published 
objective is "to demand an immediate cessation 
of fighting and a v/ithdrawal of all American 
troops from Indochina", 

"Operation Snowplow" is a nonpolitical 
coalition of Miami organizations whose purpose 
is to provide food, shelter and medical services 
to nondelegate youth groups who v/ill come to 
Miami for the Democratic National Convention. 

. mm T-3 . 


D'.i TOITE PANTHER PARTY (WPP) ■ 

The White Panther Party (WPP) is a national white, 
hippie-oriented revolutionary organization which 
was founded essentially to afford support to the 
Black Panther Party (BPP) . It has advocated the 
published ten-point program of the BPP and has 
added a ten-point program of its own, all of which 
call for the unbridled personal freedom of the 
individual . 

The Black Panther Party (BPP) is a black extremist 
organization started in Oakland, California, in 
December, 1966. It advocates the use of guns 
and guerrilla tactics to bring about the overthrow 
of the U. S, Government. 





RE: DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION 


TIAL 


During the summer of 1971, informal discussions 
=were held >;ith the leadership of the WPP at the organl?.ation 's 
headquarters in Ann Arbor, Mich ig an . Amon g the individuals 
present was a Negro male known as | who stated that 

the organization's future plans included as a next major 
target the 1972 Democratic National Convention where the WPP 
would be "seen in full force". 


MM T-6 


The WPP leadership is increasingly involved in 
planning a proposed demonstration at the Republican National 
Convention in San Diego, California; however, contrary to the 
above, there has .been no reference by the organization's 
leadership to the Democratic National Convention in Miami Beach, 
Florida, 


MM T-7 


b6 

b7C 

b7D 


IIo^ ORGANIZATIONS PLANNING ATTENDANCE 
OF DELEGATES OR MEMBERS 


A. WAR TAX RESISTANCE (WTR) AND WAR 
RESISTERS LEAGUE (WRL) 


The WRL has been publicly described as the 
American section of the War Resisters 
International, a worldwide pacifist movement 
founded in 1923. The WTR is a New York-based 
organization closely affiliated with the V/RL. 


On January 8, 1972, at a National Conference of the 
WTR and Y/RL, v/hich actually commenced on the previous day in 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, it was mentioned that the possibility 
exists that some type of revolutionary or resurrection city 
v/ould be set up in Miami during the Democratic National 
Convention and that future consideration should be given to 
having WTR people in the¥e revolutionary or resurrection cities 
to try and influence the other anti-v/ar groups to get behind 
the War Tax Resistance, 

MI, I T-8 

I b7D 



CONF 






CO^^^WlAL 



RE: DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION 


B.S VIETNAM VETERANS AGAINST THE WAR (WAW) 

See Section 1. C., supra, under FPPC. 

III.^ THREATS OF POSSIBLE VIOLENCE OR 
DISRUPTIVE ACTIVITIES 

A meeting of the Executive Board and National 
Coordinating Committee of the National Welfare Rights Organi- 
zation (NIVRO) v/as held at the Dodge House Hotel in Washington, 
D, C., during the period between February 4-6, 1972. On 
Fe bruary 6, 1972. at a meeting held und er the chairmanship 
of 


]of the organization 


from Newport News, Virginia, a proposal was presented that the 
summer conference of the N^VRO vrould be held in Miami, Florida, 
and that a main event at this conference would be some* type of 
disruptive action in connection with the Democratic Convention 
to be held in Miami in July, .1972, This proposal was agreed 
upon by all present at the meeting and it was announced that 
there would possibly be more details regarding this possible 
disruption of the Democratic Cpnvention- 

MM T-9 


bo 

b7C 

b7D 


The N17RO, in the past, has described itself as 
a private organization with national head- 
quarters in Washington, D. C., and having 
chapters in ghetto areas of approximately 100 
cities in 45 states. Its. membership is composed 
of whites, Negroes ,. Mexican-Americans, and 
Indians. The self -stated purpose of the 
organization is to seek favorable welfare 
legislation and related benefits for individuals 
on welfare. The NV/RO, in the past, has sponsored 
protest marches and demonstrations, some of which 
have resulted in arrest of membership and leaders. 

IV.- STATEMENTS BY PROTEST LEADERS 


I I on February 10, 1972, toured Miami 

and Miami Beach, Florida, including a visit to the Miami Beach 
Convention Hall, the site of the forthcoming Democratic 


8 .. 




CONITH0®TTIAL 


RE: DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION 


National Convention. 



A meeting of "Operation Snowplow” was held on 
February 10, 1972, at the Center for Dialogue, Miami, Florida. 
Approximately 50 persons were present. Law enforcement agencies 
were invited to discuss problems that may be encountered during 
the Democratic National Convention. A discussion of these 
matters took place. 

Toward the end of the session, 

introduced himself and commented on what ’’The Movement” people 
might be expected to do during the forthcoming Democratic 
National Convention. 

stated that the tentative plan was to establish 

a statewide coalition sometime in February, 1972, in Tampa, 

wir.yTr^a ^The coalition would then develop a statewide network, 

would function as the coordinator. Meetings v/ould be 

held to discuss a political platform v/ith the organizations 
within the coalition. 


Student Mobilization Committee at the University 
of South Florida (SMC-USF). 

The SMC is controlled by the Socialist Workers 
Party (SWP) and its affiliate, the Young 
Socialist Alliance (YSA) , The SWP has been 
designated pursuant to Executive Order 10450. 


con™ential 



r 


COiqFjS NTIAL 

RE: DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION 



IThen the statewide coalition has been established, 
a concert would be held in Tampa, Florida, to raise funds. 

The tentative date for the conecrt is March 4, 1072. "The 
Movement" performers and speakers v/ould take part. The 
high point would be the appearance of JOHN LENNON of "Beatles" 
fame. The concert would be a quick, clean affair to project 
the image of a "good guy" approach. 


The concert in Tampa would again be staged the 
following day in Miami Beach, Florida, and would be referred 
to as a political rally for youth. It v/ould be directed toward- 
the problems of old age and aimed particularly at the elderly 
of Miami Beach. JOHN LENNON again would entertain. Contacts 
would be made to solidify the aged v/ith the youth movement. 

The. theme v/ould be that some 20,000 "freaks" from Miami v/ould 
raise money lor the elderly. 

The overall purpose is to establish an image 
necessary to insure that an area can be obtained for a third 
rally to be staged during the convention. By building a 
political base with the elderly on Miami Beach, it might 
follow that they would initiate the pressures for such an area 
at that time. 

commented that the Inter ama site, an 
area in North Miami, mentioned as a staging area for "Movement" 
people during the Democratic National Convention, v/as unsatis- 
factory. It was too far from the convention site, had too 
many trees and the terrain was too rocky. 


I [ also inferred that if they experienced difficulty 

in obtaining a rally site, the "big guns" might be brought in • 
for- confrontation. | | said they will not be brought in for 

direct action bui: for negotiation. He related that the inertia 
stemming from the 1968 Democratic Convention was more than 
enough to carry this out without direct action or confrontation 
With the Estaliliaiiment in the Miami area. It was the 

inference of that a situation of hysteria would arise 

as the Democrats do not want another confrontation as happened 
in Chicago. He remarked, however, that if worse came to worse, 
the program would be initiated and quite easily cari'ied out. 



J 




COl 


TIAL 


RE; DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION 


hopefully because of the political base that had already 
been established with the elderly on Miami Beach, 

.b6 

Iclosed by stating the demonstrations which b? 

are not planned to be violent could last anywhere from one to 
three days at convention time. The v/orst he could envision 
would be "Movement” people marching on the Convention Hall 
to present a proclamation and he doubted this v/ould occur, 

JERRY RUBIN was a guest on a telephone talk show 
broadcast by Radio Station WBUS, Miami, Florida, during the 
evening of February 15, 1972, 


^Vhen a caller requested support of RUBIN for* 

"Operation Snowplow", he stated he had no knowledge of the- 
project. When it was explained to him that it was a non- 
partisan effort to feed, house and transport youthful 
demonstrators who may come to the Democratic National Convention, 
he said that he would support the concept. Shortly after 
midnight while still on the air, a bomb threat was received 
at the -radio station. 


Special Agent, FBI 
February 16, 1972 

JERRY RUBIN spoke at the University of Miami (U of M), 
Coral Gables, Florida, during the evening of February 14, 1972, 
In his remarks, he mentioned the ' forthcoming Democratic 
National Convention and stated the U of M students, who are in 
Miami, should lead the way. They should build an organization 
in Miami that would facilitate helping of outside agitators 
coming to Miami, ■ The U of M students know the streets where 
actions could take place. Agitators, thus organized, could 
then go from Miami to San Diego, 


V,-^ PERMITS 
Captain 


MM T-3 


Miami Beach Police 


b6 

b7 

b7 


11 . 


COOT 


TML • 


U Q 



a 



EE: DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION 


Department, advised on March 17, 1972, that there is no law 
in Miami Beach requiring that a permit be obtained prior to 
conducting a demonstration or picket, ko official request 
for a permit has been received from any groups or individuals 
to date in connection with the Democratic National Convention. 

VI .» POSSIBILITY OE DISTURBANCE IN THE ETHNIC 
COMMUNITIES DURING THE CONVENTION 

During the months of January through March, 1972, 
continuing contact with sources, in a position to be aware 
of possible plans for violence among members of ethnic and 
minority communities in the Greater Miami, Florida, area, 
has produced no indication of planned violence or disturbances 
to take place during the Democratic National Convention. 


property of FBI - TWs document contcanB 

SSier recommendalions nor conclusions 

of the FBI. It is the propcrtv of »ho 
FBI and is loaned to your agency, h «nd 
its contents are not to be distribu e 


tr/Mir 



FD-323 (Re-a. i 1-29-61) 



In Reply, Please Refer to 

File No. 80-1353 


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 
FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 


Miami, Florida 
March 23, 1972 


Title DEMONSTRATIONS AT THE DEMOCRATIC 

NATIONAL CONVENTION, MIAMI BEACH, 
• FLORIDA 


Reference Memorandum dated and captioned as 
above, at Miami, Florida, . 


All sources (except any listed helo-w) whose identities 
are concealed in referenced communication have furnished reliable 
information in the past= 


MM T-6, insufficient contact with whom does not 
allow assessment of reliability. 


Jf’tL'^FsTaTd recommendations nor conclusions of the FBI. It is the property 

yLr agency. contents are not to be distributed outslL 



FEOH: 


r 


1 C 


’LiiSE^pCATIOIf AUTHOKITY DlllVi 
r adt^Ktic DICLASSIFICATIOH Gl 
: i 02-1S-2012 



3/23/7S 


AIRTEL 


TOs MRECDOR# FBI (Attention: Domestic Intelligence 

Division) 

FROMs SAC, MIAMI (80-1353) (P) 

SUBJECSTs MIDBM 


Re AleKandria letter to the Bureau dated 11/18/71, 
captioned «?«HITE PASTHBR PAB3?y (WPP), IS - WPP”? 

Milwaukee airtel and IBM to the Bureau dated 1/14/72, 
captioned ”WAR TAX SESISCAHCE (WTR), IS - NEl? lEFT, WAR 
RESISTERS IBAGOE (WRE), IS - I3BW lEFT”? 

Chicago teiet]^e to the Bureau dated 1/24/72, 
captioned "YOOTH INTBRHATIQSAh PARTY, IS - YIP”? 

dackson airtel and IBM to the Biareau dated 2/19/72, 
captioned ”MATI0EAIi WEIFARE RI<^S 0RGANIZAEI011 (KWRO) - 
EM"? 

Miami airtel to the Bureau dated 2/17/72, captioned 
"DAVID TYRE DSDDINGER, ET AI» (Travel of Defendants), ARB - 
CONSPIRACY. COC”» enclo sing IBM dated 2/17/72, entitled 

Hew York airtel and IBM to the Bureau dated 2/18/72, 
captioned "PBOPIB^S COABITIOH FOR PEACE AHD JUSTICE (PCPJ), 

IS - HEW IiEFT”? 

Miami airtel to the Bureau dated 2/23/72, captioned 
“DAVID TYRE DEBLIHGER, KT AI» (Travel of Defendants) ARB - 
CONSPIRACY, COC”, enclosing IBM dated 2/23/72, entitled 
"JERRY CIYDE RUBIN”? 

Tanpa airtel and LHM to the Bureau dated 3/9/72, 
captioned "FBORIDA PEOPBE^S PLATFORM COALITION (FPPC), aka 
Florida People* s Coalition, IS - HEW LEFT”? 

2 - Bureau (Enc, 8) (BM) 1 - San Diego (100- ) (CALREP) 

2 Miami <1 - 80-1353) (Info) (RM) (Eilc. 2) 

‘ - (1 - 80-1353 Stib 

GFC/tawsrael 
(5) 





■bo 

b7C 



m 80-1353 


Buceau letter to Miami dated 3/14/72? 

Detroit letter to the Bureau dated 3A5/72, 
captioned PAOTHBR PARTY <WPP), IS - ISPP”. 

Enclosed for the Bureau are the asriginal and 
seven copies of IflM captioned “Demonstrations at the Democratic 
national Convention# Miami Beach, Florida” and dated as 
a330Ve» 


Service, 


local dissemination being siade to S« Secret 


Sources utilized in niH are as follows? 


MM T-1 
mi T-2 
MH T-3 
MM T-4 
MM T-5 
MM T-6 


MM T-7 
13M T-8 
MM T-9 
MM ^t?-10 



SAs| I and JCm P. MAHER observed 

the PCPJ press conference on 1/27/72 at Hew Yorh City. 

Special Agent reporting information on remarks 
of JERRY RtIBZH over radio station WBUS on 2/16/72 was 


— 2 — 





in order to protect iE4M T-1 and other sources of continuing 
value whose identities# if disclosed# could detrimentally 
effect the national defense interests of the United States# 


3 



in Hi*ply^ PiiHisn Hpfvr to 
File No. 


DlCLAaSIIICATIOH 


FBI MJTOHiLTl!^ 
DATE 02”lS=?n 


JOTTHOHITY DIRI¥ID IROH: 
CLaSSIFICATIOH GUIDl 


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 


t'EDEFlAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 


March 22, 1972 
Washington, D. C, 



EKTIAL 




RE* SOUTHERN REGIONAL COMMITTEE (SRC) 

COMMUNIST PARTY - USA 
INTERNAL SECURITY - COMMUNIST 


On March 20, 1972, a source who has furnished 
reliable information in the past, advised that a meeting 
of the Southern Regional Committee (SRC) was held at 
Birmingham, Alabama, on March 18, and 19, 1972. 

The source furnished the following details 
regarding this meeting! 


Persons Attending Meeting 


Present at the meeting were the following indi- 
viduals: 


CLAUDE LIGOTFOOT from the National 
Black Commission of the CP USA; 


b6 

b7i 

b?: 



Excluded 
downgra 
decla 


automatic 


{fidexBd— 
SsrisSizod 
nic(i 







CONFi«ENTIAL 


RE: SOUTHERN REGIONAL COMMITTEE (SRC) 

COMMUNISt PARTY - USA 

iNxkRNAL security - COMMUNIST 



[ attended the meeting as an observer on 

March 19, 1972, and is not considered a member ol the SRC. 
All other individuals are considered members of the SRC. 

March 18, 1972 

The conference opened on morning of March 18, 
1972, with a surv ey of the el ectoral situation in the 
southern states. I I stated that the Alabama CP had 

great success in obtaining signatures to get a candidate 
on the ballot. They received, excellent coverage from the 

television and press. added that several CP members 

came from New York to help collect signatures. These CP 
members were very enthusiastic regarding the reception they 
received from the people in Birmingham. BAINES added that 
over fifty copies of the ’’Daily World” are being sold in 


)ENTIAL 


2 . 






SNTIAL 


SOUTHERN REGIONAL COMMITTEE (SRC) 
COMMUNIST PARTY - USA 
internal SECURITY - COMMUNIST 


Birmingham alon^ and they expect to increase this to 100 
in the near future. He said the Party is receiving a good 
reception in the black community. 

CLAUDE LIGHTFOOT then stated that the Party 
would like to have a more analytical survey of the black 
vote in the south as to class composition, number of 
youth, women and rural individuals involved,. He stated 
the Party must maintain contact with persons who sign 
petitions and organize to visit them. 

from Louisville, Kentucky, stated 

that in his state 1,460 signatures had been filed and 
1,000 more were neede d to get t he Party on the b allot. 

The Kentucky CP wants I ] and | t the CP 

candidates for president and vice president, to speak in 
Kentucky , 

from Tennessee, advised that 36,000 
signatures were neeueu to get on the ballot in Tennessee 
and this would be impossible. 

from Florida, stated that 28,000 signa- 
tures are needed in this state before August 15, 1972 and 
this, too, was impossible, 

gave a lengthy analysis of the 
North Carbiina economic and political situation and stated 
that they were anxious to put the Party on the ballot there, 
but needed help. She criticized the National Committee to 
Win the War in Indochina, as a bunch of liberals who do not 
wish any demonstrations. 

I ~| fraa Texas, stated nothing had been 

done there to put the CP on the ballot and youth participation 
in CP affairs was practically non-existent. 

COJrsraENTIAL 


3 



CONFMENTIAL 


RE; SOUTHERN REGIONAL COMMITTEE (SRC) 
C(^UNIST party - USA 
Hi'X'Jbi’RHAL SjaCURllx - COMiiuNlSi 


I added Chicanos are active in the 

La Raza uniaa and are doing good work in Texas. He 
said the Party in Texas needs help in collecting 
signatures and this must be done from May 6 to June 
2, 1972. 

After a lengthy discussion, it was agreed 
that the CP should concentrate in trying to get the 
Party on the ballot in North Carolina, Louisiana, 

Virginia, Texas, and Florida. After the above dis- 
cussion, officers of the Southern Reg ion Commission of 

the SRC were elected. and| 

were elected co-chairmen of the SRC. It was de cided 
that [ would be the active chairman, since] 

will o e vote full t ime as the southern organizer of the 
YWLL, I [ was elected ! I (Last 

Name Unknown) will serve on the Executive Committee. All 
those present were considered members of the SRC. 

March 19, 1972 

The first part of the session on Sunday, March 
19, 1972, dealt mainly with the manifesto the SRC is pre- 
paring to issue. The discussion was inconc lusive and all 
the notes from the discussion w ere given to | 

who will go over the notes with who will spend 

the next week in North Carolina with F ~l The first 

draft of the manifesto is to be sent to members of the SRC 
for final approval and the resulting draft will be mailed 
to the National Office for final editing by mid-April. 

A discussion was then held on building the Party 
in the various districts and all agreed there was considerable 
work to be done. 

It was also agreed that there was a lot of right 
opportunism in various Party groups, that decisions are 
not followed up and there is unconscious white chauvinism. 

It was agreed that classes are needed to strengthen 
Party ideology since practically all members in the new 
areas are young and have no Party experience. 

CONF^NTIAL 


4 




RE: SOlrtHERN REGIONAL COMMITTEE (SBC) 

COMMUNIST PARTY - USA 
INTERNAL SECURITY - COMMUNIST 


CLAUDE LlGHTEOOl' said the CP must do many things 
to help old memhers who can teach, such as WILLIAM 
WEINSTONE, since they are available and can be sent to 
the south loi* several weeks to teach. 

ROSCOE PROCTOR, from the CP National Office, is 
scheduled to go to Nashville, Tennessee on April 21 to 
April 23, 1972, to teach classes there and he will attempt 
to see if Memphis and Louisiana can be included in his trip. 

CLAUDE LIGHTFOOT plans to come to various areas 
in the south in early October to speak about his book. 
Included in these areas will be North Carolina and Georgia. 

It is further planne d that a big election meeting 
will be held for i I in Birminghmam. In addition, 

plans are being made lor selected candidates to go to New 
York for cadre classes. CLAUDE LIGHTFOOT stated if these 
new candidates cannot go to New York, the Party would arrange 
to have classes taught in the southern region. 

LIGiTTFOOT stated that it is hoped that there will 
be a special concentration in Florida for signature collec- 
tions inasmuch as the Democratic Party Convention is being 
held in Miami. He stated that he believes a full-time paid 
organizer is needed in Florida. 

CLAUDE LIGHTFOOT stated that this SRC meeting was 
the most productive he has attended. He was gratified 
to see so many youthful members present, but stated more 
blacks should be involved. 


The meeting agreed that particular concentration 
in organizing the Party should occur in Virginia, South 
Carolina, and Mississippi but present areas must be strengthened 
especially if there is any possibility lor doing so. 


I plans to go to the Virginia area in May 
lor a coordinated effort to organize a Party and put it on 
the ballot . 




CONFJTOENTIAL 


5 . 


I 


tr 



COMF^g^IAL 

RE: SOUTHERN REGIONAL COMMITTEE (SRC) 

COMMUNIST PARTY - USA 
internal security - COMMUNIST 


I I then state d that there Is 

white sectarianism in Birmingham and | 

said the same is also true of the Party in North Caro- 
lina. The next meeting of the SRC is scheduled to be 
held in Nashville, Tennessee, on June 10 and 11, 1972. 

The agenda will be: 1) a report on youth with emphasis 

on the YWLL, .2) a report on the Southern Conference 
Educational Fund (SCEF) and its relationship to the 
Southern Chris tian Leadership Conference (SCLC) . 

l indicated she plans to go to Atlanta to 
see what is going on with respect to the SCLC and she 
stated that the SCLC would like her to be on their 
national staff. 3) Report on progress on 1972 Signa- 
ture Campaign. (Efforts of CP to get on state ballots). 

(Last Name Unknown) urged those present 

to send representatives to Memphis on April 8, 1972 to 
organize a Southern Regional Conference to Free ANGELA 

DAVI S. She stated a meeting would be held on t hat day 

with! —3 and possibl y | 

Persons present were 

urgea to contact tne Koutnern Regional Conference to Free 
ANGELA DAVIS, Post Office Box 4643, Memphis, Tennessee, 
telephone number 278-3046. 

CLAUDE LIGHTFOOT appealed to the delegates to 
raise funds for GUS HALL*s presidential campaign. He 
said the National Office of the CP has never been as low 
on money as they are at the present time. 

Miscellaneous 

Source furnished the following additional informa- 
tion regarding individuals at the conference: 







SOUTHERN REGIONAL COMMITTEE (SRC) 
COMMUNIST PARTY - USA 
INTERNAL SECURITY - COMMUNIST 



His telephone 


s of I 

Her telephone 


1 (Last Name Unknown) from | [_ 

is described as white male, | 

I 5 feet 6 inches tall, weight 170 pounds , med ium 
complexion . 


I I (Last Name Unknown) from] 

is a white female, | | blond hair. 


tall, 140 pounds, heavy 
and has long hair. 


Inches 


attractive, wears glasses 


Source also learned that |from the 

who is attending college in | | 

I is in ch arge of the YWLL there. He is described as 
a jwegro male , |~ , . ] ® feet 8 inches tall, 17S 

pounds. H e is studying political science. at an unknown 
college in | [ 

Source al so learned that a youn g blond white female, 
named | I who is appa rently from I is 

quite friendly with ] | She indicated she would be 

willing to go to North Carolina on behalf of the CP. Neither 

I nor I I were present at the SRC meeting but were present 

at a party held the evening of March 18, 1972 in the same 
location where instant SRC meeting was held. 

This document contains neither recommendation 
nor conclusions of the FBI. It is the property of the 
FBI and is loaned to your agency; it and its contents are 
not to be distributed outside your agency. 






ALL IIFOMmTTOl COHTATIIED 

HERE II IS UIICIASSIFIED 

DJLtt 02-16 = 2012 BY 60322 UC/LpHR'KH 

F B 1 

• 


Date: 

3/22/72 

Transmit the follnwinn in 



AIRTEL 

(Type in plaintext or code) 



(priority) 


FROM; 


DIRECTOR, FBI (100-3-105) 
SAC, MIAMI (100-16609) (P) 


SOUTHERN REGIONAL COMMITTEE (SRC) 
COMMUNIST PARTY - USA 
IS - C 

00: HEW YORK 


Re Miami teletypes to the Bureau dated 
3/15/72 and 3/20/72. 

Enclosed for the Bureau are eight (8) copies 
of LHM dated and captioned as above^ Extra copies 
are being furnished for possible dissemination to other 
agencies by the .Bureau. Recipient offices are being 
furnished two copies of airtel and LHM for case file on 
instant organization in the event SRC becomes active in 
their areas. Appropriate copies are also being furnished 
for files of subjects residing in respective field 
divisions. 

2 - Bureau (Encs 8 ) (RM) 

3 - Atlanta (157-SCLC) (Encs 3) (RM) 

2 - Alexandria (Encs 2) (RM) 

5 - Birmingham (Encs 5) (RM) 

( 1-1 
(1 - 1 
(1 - 1 

5 - Charlotte (Encs , , , 

(1 - 100-1 

n - ino_ CaMr;'. 


2 - Columbia (Encs 2) (RM) 

2 - Jackson (Encs 2) (RM) 

3 - Knoxvill e (Encs 3) (RM) 

(1 - 100- 1 I 

3 - Louisvil le (Encs 3) (RM) 
(1 - lOO j | > 

Copies Continued Paee 2 


pproved: 


pecial Agent in Charge 











mm 100-16609 


Copies (Cont.) 


2 

3 

2 

5 


2 

3 


- Mobile (Enos 2) (RM) i 

- Memphis (Encs_3) (RM) 

(1 - 100 1 1 lnu) 

- Nbw Orleans (Encs 2) (RM) 

- New York (Encs 5) (RM) 

(1 - 100-CLAUDE LIGHTFOOT) 




(1 - 100 - 

(1 - 100-YWLL) 

Richmond (Encs 2) (RM) 

San Anto nio (Encs 3) (R M") 


(1 - 100 - 

Savannah (Encs 2) (1^ 
Miami 

(L - 100-16609) 

(Qy - 80-1353) (MIDEM) 

a -I I 

(1 - 100 - 15518 ) 
JPM/rgn 
(50) 


) 


Source is 


bo 

b7C 

b7D 


source f 


LHM is classified »GOWFTDENTTAT.» to’ further nrot^r- t 


to tne natlonaT 


f’ 


Disclos ure of his identity could be damagin g 

dftfftn.cio. I 


No local dissemination is being made of LHM Inasmuch 
as it is felt more logical for the Bureau to disseminate to 
appropriate agencies at the Washington level which agencies 
can in turn disseminate to logical stations under their command 

LEADS 


RECIPIENT OFFICES 

Requested to be alert for activities of the 
SRC in their respective territory. 


be 

b7C 

b7D 


2 . 









• : .-3- • 


. LL&o tin blood' bits noi;dsr;i:io±nx 'XO-'X 

APPENDIX TO DRAFT RESOLUTION OF ACTION COMISSrON‘}-c558 Ifso -xs'.vanB on. dl 

, ‘ " ■ : ^)Wi,a/0b'2 Txsl/i 

- pril 1. During Holy Week, the week in which Martin Luther King Jr was 
assassinated, there will be regional actions at Harisburg, 

Perinsylvaniz (the site of the Berrigan trial) and at San Jose, 

California ^ (The Angela_Davis tbal) against repression of anti-r 

dud radical movement and individuals in the US. . 

April 15. Nation-wide local actions' against the costs of the war, including 
resistance to tax-payments for th'e war. — 

April 22. National mass actions in 'New York and Los ANgeles to demand an 

" ■ ^ unconditional end to US involvement in the war in Indochina. 

May i-15. A series of local actions including rallies, lobbies, and civil 
disobedience at the centers of the war machine, at Federal ' 
buildings, at corporations manufacturing for the war, and 
support for active duty GIs X'jho refuse to participate in the 
air war. ' • 


Thi s campa ign will lea d up to the Democratic Party Conventino at 
"Miami on July y and the Republican convention in San Diego 
on August 21. ^ 


It is essential that this American campaigii be coordinated with 
the entire international war movement so that the full wieght / 
of international outrage nan-b&vbr ought to hhar'-*oh-Nlxph'-an.d 
his . policies . , • , 2i-' ' ' ' 


lO'l 




'lewBiiB on If 


! 

O 


lA ! (a/()Hc 


j A „J iJ I 



FD-36 (Rev.^S-22-64) ^jjp 


{ 

» i 

F B 1 



Date; 

3/22/72 

Transmit the follnwinn in 

a , ^ 


AIRTEL 

(Type in plaintext 

or code! 


(PrioTits) 


PROM: 


SAC 5 PHILADELPHIA 

SAC 3 NEW YORK (100-175748) (p) 


SUBJECT: RIVERSIDE CAJiPAIGN T O PypoSE \ 

THE AIR WAR _ t 

IS-NElf LEFT • :t 

Attached for receiving o ffices are two' copies 
of leaflet furnished b3,r|^^_^^^.on 3/21/72. On 3/21/72 
source- stated he has received the, impression from members 
of PCPJ who are familiar with the slide show on automated 
US Army weapons that some of the slides picture war material 
the US Government considers classified. 


Philadelphia (100- ) (Ends. 2) (Rl4) 

(1-100- ) (AMERICAN FRIENDS SERVICE C0M!4ITTEE) 

Los Angela f Anti-War Demo., LA, 4/22/72.) (Ehqls. 2) (RM) 
(100- ) (Ends. 2) (RM) 

San Diego(CALREP) (100- ) (Ends. 2) (RM) 

San. Francisco (DEMO AT A. DAVIS TRIAL) (100- ) (Ends. 2)/?> 

New York fl00-l6QQRQ) ^42) rPHP.T) ^ 


RPI^:lh 

(14) 


Approved; 










■ ■ 








Special Agent in Chare 


U. S. COVlSNMKNT PRrNTING OFFICE: 1971 -4I3-I3S 







3/24/72 




AIETEIi 


TO; DIRECTOR, FBI 

(ATTtT; DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE DIVISION) 

FROM: SAC^ MIAMI (80-1353) 


MIDEM 


/ 


At the regular wpelcly planning session regarding 
the Democratic Convention/he ld in Miami Bea^h on 3/23/72. 
the session was addressed by] I Conflict 

Resolutions TTw-i-t:, r^nniDittr»-i ■t-y Wintr l-ons Service « U.S . 

Departme nt of Justice/ Atlanta, G^rgia and byl 


Communicatioj^s expert, CRS, Washington, D.C. 


CRS is an official U.S, Government agency in the 
U.S, Department of Justice created under the authority 
of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 for the purpose of assisting 
local ccKamunities in avoiding racial conflicts and upheavals . 


anq [outlined a proposal to assist 

in establishing a rumor control center, or as they prefer 
to call it, an infoimation coordination center, in the 
Miami area duxing the period of the Democratic Convention. 


Types of information to be coordinated would 
fall into four categories; 


1) Rumor 

2) Crank calls or anxiety-generated calls 

3) "Information giving" calls 

4) "Information requesting" calls 


3^- Bureau (RM) 
/i J- Miami 
^rCB/fp 
( 6 ) 



3 - San Diego (100-CALREP) (EM) 



be 

b7C 





’TJie center would lie sot np hs local jKiopIe, 
jorsibls' rolisl<J^s OS' civic s^oupB and ^??cuXd bs 
cn2orcsnent cricntsu**, altlicusb it wcuM so teycsnd law 

V*!<^»r'»»-ii'VH5t'’5 T'"t 'J ■??*•» rvic^ .n'{*-f*!-i— r%4>Jf Wi-i-« <*<■» 4*>f^ 

cis^ ecntvoX to tbo tonoktt of the cosnoaity. 

Local autliorifcics Iiavo inOdcatotl a favorable 
initial response to tbo CafS proposal, and they will cive it 
fjjrtlier ccitsidoratioa* Tboy will protnbly hold additional 
iiischssions with CStS representatives ros^^rdins this r.attcr, 

Above is ret ferth for infcmation of the Etircais 
and Saa Lioso* 



OPTJONAl. FORM NO, JO 
MAY XtSZ EDITION 
GSAFPMR (« CFR) 


UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

Memorandum 


DIRECTOR, FBI (157.-16554) 


DATEt 3/20172 


SAC, HOUSTON (157-2099) 


- RUC 


CONGRESS OF AFRICAN PEOPLES 
EM - CAP 


Reference Boston report of SA 
dated 2/16/72, and Las Vegas airtel to tne Bureau aated 
2/29/72. 

I advised SA 

on March 14, 1972, that there continues to be no chapter of the 
CAP at Houston, Texas, and source knew of no plans of CAP 
to disrupt Democratic and Republican Conventions during June 
and July, 1972. 

Source further advisd that ha could furnish no 
information concerning the national black political conference 
recently held in Gary, Indiana, from March 10 - 12, 1972. 


2 - Bureau (RM) 

2 - Boston (157-1565) (RM) 
2 - Las Vegas (Info)(PxM) 
Miami (Info) (R14) 

2 - San Diego (Info) (RM) 

2 - Houston (1 - 157-2099^ 
(1 - 


CJP/swb 

( 12 ) 


qHJQ^ 



Buy U.S, Savings Bonds Ktgularly on the Payroll Savings Plan 










DIESCTOR, FBI 


FROM: SAC, MIAMI <100-HSW) 

BS; EIVSRSIDS CAKIPAIGH 

EXPOSE THE AIR i?AR \ 

IS ~ nm LEFT 
(00:Kew York) 

EeHYairtel to Philadelphia, 3/22/72, for’wardlDg 
leaflet issued hy this organisation, together \jith a . 
sheet entitled ^'Appendix to Draft Resolution of Action 
Comsiissioii”, “which states, aaong other things: 

”Kay 1-15, A series of local actions in- 
cluding rallies, lobbies and civil disobedience 

, St (• ux v?ax* luuvuxitt;?^ la v 

buildings, at corporations manufacturing for the 
war, and support for active duty GIs who refuse 
to participate in the air war* 

“This campaign will lead up to the Bemocratie 
Party Convention at Miami on July 9 and the 
Republican Convention in San Diego on August 21. 

*’It is essential that this American campaign 
be coordinated with the entire international war 
movement so that the full wieght of international . 
outrage can be brought to bear on Hixon and his 
policies.*^, 

2 • Btareau (EM) 

2 - New York (100«*175748)<1M) 

San Diego (gai^EPUlnfaUEM) 

\(/\ f%fr Miami 1353)^3 ^ 

y (6) ■ \^<s0^ 

ggrisUie^-^" ^ ^ 






York roquos'fed prepare this 

information in. form suitable for dissemination, and 
thereafter closely folio'^ and promptly report plans of 
this organiaatioa as they aaterialiaa t?ith respect to 
MID3M and CAUliSP. 


York, also please furnish thumbnail sketch 
for Elvers ide Campaign to Expose the Air War, 

Please dielgnate copy of material prepared for 
dissestination for Miami file 80<~135S, re llDJilM 


3/24/72 


MmEh 


7;0t 


Ee Atlanta toslotyps to Bureau, Miaai and San 
Blcco, SAC/72, and Bureau letter to Atlanta, 3/22/72 « 


By referenced letter Bureau authorized |_ 

to contact Miami or San Diego if he should develop 
information concerning the MIDBM or CADEBB which he can 
not furnish to the Atlanta Office on a timely basis ^ 





4S5S> (niDDM) 








FD-3S0 (Rev. 7-16-63) 



( 


(Mount Clipping in Space Below)’ 


UfB group cm 



« TJie Dade chap’tef pjf -tjie 
iNatiraa Or.ganizat|on. of 
W d'rit&n- - :(NOW) today 
charged- that ;wofflen‘ are , 
I being exploited in tiier fe- . 
oruitnaefifc' of IQO .jiostesses 
fdrthe parly-’s national, qpn- 
' veiition. oh Miami Bdaph this 
.Summer,.; " 

. - -MWe are, deeply .disturbed 
that age-, physical fheasiife- 
mehts-andfeaturesof wom'em 
; are the primary crilbffa tp..ibe 
usedf(ir 5 ronipting;-theimage 
of- the Democratic-Dirtyi,’’ 
said Mrs,- Elaine Gordon, a 
spokeswomah: for the Tvpm- 
en,'srights.organizatioh. 

“Tb.e ■party should %e re- 
• cruitmg.Demp,crats''and_ not 
I bunnies,” she said, ' 

* - . • 

BSpt .Ted- Ciohen, cprchair- ' 
mantof. the EIondaiHo^itali« 
ty and Hostess Comhiittee, 

|> denied there was any at** 
tempCto expolif women..“We 
arfe Ittokfiig for thd" young 
wholesome type and not flie 
sex impge type,^* Coheit saidi 

At the center of thS con-^ 
i-’troversy is a- one-page leaflet- 
■ announcing- a drive to. recruit, 
hostesses. ' Those interested 
were asked to fill out the 
bottom of the leaflet’ and 
send it to- C ohen ht 1 Eincoln 
. Kd., Miami Seacft; ' ■ ' 



(Indicate page, name of 
newspaper, city and state.) 


MIAMI NEWS 
MIAMI, FLORIDA 


Date: 3/23/72 

Edition: 

Author; 

Editor: 

DEMOCRATIC 
flATIONAL CONVENTION 

Character: 

or 

Classification: 80-1353 
-srS^lttlng Office: JkJJAMI , FLA. 

I I Being Investigated 


{ 


. "Cohen- and Anit (irramer, 
■vine (didi i itt anroH He-'fldrida 
’■pefeocratipr Baily, wetn ap- 
, . pointed by Goy^' 'Peubin 
Askew as cp-cbairman of the 
hospitality - committee. The 
'governor made .the appoint- 

■ me'nt.sin his-ranat'ity aq head 
of the Florida Host Commit- 
tee for the-conventiofi. 

The -text of the- leaflet 
states that Women applying 

■ for hostess should be.; be- 
tween; the -ages of i& and 28, 
attractive- arid, “hopefully 

• partial tO. the Deiriocratic' 

Party.’^ . ■ • . ..• 

They will, he outfitted'rin a 
, “distinctiye unifpim.rdentify- 
. ihg‘them;.ak:t0fffci4Gpjiyen- 
' ti'6n'‘hbstessesi’ '” Aa'iUpfl^t - 

■ said. They, will also afterid', 
“celebri^ affairs aM'Official 

. convention meetings^!’ it , 
.sain,.',' . 

portion of likflet' 
to, ibe ' Clipped oii dottejd ' 
bile,' fflled Out hjid; settt to ‘ 
Cohen asks. the. applicant her 1 
jhriri-tTa4 statiris,. heighi:,'- 
weight an]S measiirenients'. 

• ' • • • * • • -‘f . 

.if also asks the girl If'sHe ~ 

• wopldi be willing-to-’ partict-' 
Date in a “Conventidii Queen ’ 
contest. Chheii.said tbis .idc t = 

j Ms..sirice been dropped con ^ j 
’■-pletely. ■ j 

■ The ages were set from IS ! 
to- 28, Cohen said, becapse ' 
•theiob of the .hostess wilbbe ' 
■deriiahdirtgi. However, he Said 
that there will he some chp- 
aeri who willbe und'ef 18 and 
•some over 28 and' they will 
be both marrjedand single. 

Measurements were asked 
for, Cohen added,, because in 
planning the uniforms its 
hoped that two or three basic 
sizes can be made to fit the 
women. This would save * 
casts,.he indicated". 

He also said that it was I 
not limited to Democrats be- 
' cause it might be unfair to ; 
young girls who hadn’t yet ‘ 
re'gistered.tflJiate'Who would 
therefore be exluded; 


'• Mrs, Cramer s aid she was 
not, fully awareof what was 
being done in regard to- the 
I'ecrmtmerit of hostesses; 
And,, she added, that sHe 
probably wouldn’t have ap- 
proved of .any release- or leaf- 
let-asking, for the physical 


But, she said; Cohen’s ex- \ 
plariation seems to justify the ! 
request. 

She said she felt the How 
’ criticisms were unfair partic- 
1 nlariy in -regard to herself. 

, she ejjplained that she’s been 
, for the Mghts of women and 
; that she herself became the' 
r first state chainrian of the, 
t Siofida Democratic Party in 
, 1970. 

An official NOW protest 
. Was sent to Gov; Reubin 
Mkew.,Part of a letter to. 

' Askew said “The criteria as 
specified .on the application 
(leaflet) disc'riminrites 
' against'Ioyal, active niembers- 
0f the .party, particularly!, 
mince party inembersliip ia 
not -a -requirement for- tha 
1 designation, ‘Official Convenf 
jtignsHostess.,’’ ^ , 


democratic 5.0NVENTION PLANNING SUMMARY ,^-1ARCH 23, 1 972 


SoutheLt°Req?onal'^r^nn Marge Curet and William Seldon of the 

Service Agency fcsAl Resolution Unit of the Federal — Cnmmuni ty 

Assistant to Lurt L • planning members 

of the FUMda HaJiSe JairoK ■ “' = «''e'arrr-anTTgt7 


ass?^„=l = ' IS flpSSsSn^I;^veS^^n^f'; = ’ Convent.on CS^-aSucf^ier* * 
in "reading the^tenor of ^^ency in this area who specialize 

in establishina a mmny^ • They also pledged assistance 

Colonel! ^will o[. information coordination center. 

regard.^ ® meeting with involved agencies in this 


OLD BUSINESS 
1- Multiple Arrests 

■* powers. p_p j 

Ordinance package, 
^ngerprint checks 
’'^„Curfew Ordinance. 

'• Tac^fl'^ trai ning . 


Candidate securi ty . 


Meeting with judges reference 
legal technicalities. 


REQUIRED ACTION OR ACTION TAKEN 

Captain I [ reported on joint 

meeting.^ Anti cipate copy of short 
arrest form to be available at next 
meeting. 

finalizing procedure. 

.b6 

Working. fc7c 

( Via Secret Service. 


Captain 
and Mia 


and Major researching 

pursuing with PSD 


^ajor l I coordi nating . Currently 

confi rmed candidates are; 

Humphrey, Muskie, Wallace, Jackson 
and McGovern. 

verbally reported on a 
meeti ng wi th Majpr Schempp, Public 
Defender., ACLU representatives, etc. 
Advisory Committee will recommend 
that Judge Wiseheart designate Judge 
Thomas Lee as coordinator. Next 
committee meeting to include Captain 
l and a member of the Bar 
Associ ati on . 


StARCHED mEXeO~ 







DICLASSIFICATIOH AUTHORITY MRIUID FROH 



In Reply, Please Refer lo 

File No. ba 157-5554 


FBI .AUTOMATIC DEDLASSIFICATIOH GUIDE 
“*■’ DAT^|^2”IS”201Z 

uniWd states department of^stice 


FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 

Baltimore, Maryland 
March 13, 1972 


CONGRESS OF RACIAL EOUALITY 





F B I 


Date: 


3/24/72 


I rannmil the lollowing in 

AIRTEL 


(Type in plaintext or iode^ 


(Fnority) 


PROM: 


DIRECTOR, FBI 

ATTENTION: DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE DIVISION 

SAC, MIAMI 


MIDEM 

Miami file 80-1353 

WEATHFUG 
Bufile 176-1594 
Miami file 176-24 


Miami Police Department (MPD) has had effective 
results from a series of classes for its officers regarding 
recognition of known local criminals, such as burglars 
and dope pushers. These classes have consisted of the 
repeated showing of 35mm slides depicting the subjects 
until the officers are thoroughly familiar with them. 

In connection with plans for the Democratic 
National Convention (DNC) to be held in Miami Beach in July, 
1972, it is felt the ability by patrolling officers to 
recognize known leaders and agitators would be highly 
advantageous and in this conne ction the Miami Office has 
contacted Captain MPD, who has agreed to be 


2 - Bureau (RM) 

2 - Detroit (BM) 

2 - Milwaukee (RM) 

2 - New York (RM) 

2 - Tampa (RM) 

1 - San Diego (100-16200) (CALREP) (Info) (RM) 

2^- Washington Field (RM) 

<7^^- Miami teioxed- 

JCB/fp feria'i’ca 


Approved: 





Special Agent | 


■ M Per 


U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICC-. 19/1 — 413 — 133 






MM 80-1353 
MM 176-24 




♦ 




conduct a series of such "instant recognition classes" 
for the^e officers prior to the convention. Captain f 


— ^ w — , — — jr — — I 

will convert glossy photographs furnished by the Bureau 
to 35imii slides to be used in the classes . 


It is felt such slides should be limited to the 
leaders and leading activists of various anti-establishment 
groups who would possibly demonstrate at the Convention, 
as well as the Bureau’s Weatherman fugitives and Ten Most 
Wanted fugitives. Those in the first category above would 
basically be those subjects currently included in the Key 
Activist Album. 


■bo 

b7C 


M laTTii is ciirrently preparing these photographs 
for Captain I I each of which will be mounted on a blank 
sheet of paper containing only subject’s name, organizational 
affiliation, and fugitive status, if applicable. 


Miami has glossy prints of each of the Ten Most 
Wanted fugitives and Weatherman fugitives. However, a 
review of the Key Activist Album reveals most of these 
photographs are unsuitable for reproduction. 

It is also felt that many offices may have new 
organizational leaders and activists not included in the 
Key Activist Album, who have expressed an intention to lead 
a Convention demonstration. 

Miami notes that leaders of the Youth International 
party, New York and Milwaukee; National Welfare Rights 
Organization, Washington, D.C, ; White Panther Party, Ann 
Arbor, Michigan; and Florida Peoples Platform Coalition, 
Tampa, Florida, all of which have expressed an intention 
of demonstrating at Miami, are not included in the Key 
Activist Albvim. 

LEADS 

DETROIT, MILWAUKEE, NEW YORK, TAMPA AND 

Washington ^tELt> office 

Will furnish Miami with most recent glossy photos 
of leaders of above-named groups who may lead a demonstration 
at the DNC. 


- 2 - 



# * 


MM 80-1353 
MM 176-24 


REQUEST OF BUREAU 


Bureau is requested to furnish Miami one glossy 
print ox each suuject in tlie Ksy Actxvi— t Alhunij, xf these 
are readily available, and to comment on the desirability 
of including other photographs in these instant recognition 
classes. Bureau may wish to consider a letter instructing 
all offices to submit current photos of leading activists 
who would logically be expected, due to their backgrounds 
or stated intentions, to lead protest demonstrations at 
the DNC. It is believed these photos to be effective 
should be limited in number. 


These recognition classes will be held as near 
as practicable to the beginning date of the Convention on 
July 10, 1972 in order to be fresh in the minds of the 
officers. 


_ 3 — 


F B I 


Transmit the following in 

airtel 


Date: 


(Type in plaintext or code) 


(Priority) 


3/24/72 


TO: DIRECTOR, FBI (100-427226) 

FROM: SAC, MIAMI (100-14796) 

RE: YOUNG SOCIALIST ALLIANCE (YSA) 

IS - C (TROTSKYIST) 

(MIDEM) 

(00: New York) 


Re Atl anta 
information frond 


■306 . dated 
that: 


transmitting 


, **During I meeting 

on I (LiMu; gave tne campaign report 

durxng waxen ne suggested that the Democratic 
National Convention to be held in Miami would 
be an excellent opportunity to get out the 
Socialist message and felt it would be easy 
to draw crowds of people into political 
discussions." 

New York, as well as Atlanta, Jacksonville, and 
Tampa, where YSA activity exists, is requested to be 
particularly alert for information relating to YSA plans 
for MIDEM and as it develops, promptly prepare in form 
suitable for dissemination. 

Copies should be designated for the Miami case 
file, Secret Service at Miami, and 80-1353, re MIDEM. 


2 - Bureau (RM) 

2 - Atlanta (100-5889) (RM) 

2 - Jacksonville (100-705) (RM) 
1 - New York (Info)(RM) 

^ Tampa (100-1792) (RM) 
marni (100-14796) 

Ul)- 80^1353) (MIDEM) 
WED/Tp:dk 

an 






Approved: 


■ 





Special Agent in Chare 


M Per 

I 

U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1971 -413-I3B 









If? 002 MM CODE 


144PM URGENT. 3-26-72 FMW 
TO DIRECTOR ATTN: DID 
JACKSONVILLE 100-2053 
TAMPA 100-2945 
FROM MIAMI 100-16596 

FLORIDA PEOPLES’S PLATFORM COALITION CFPPC)-, AKA, 
INTERNAL SECURITY - NEW LEFT. ' 


THE FLORIDA PEOPLE’S PLATFORM COALITION (FPPC) ALSO KNOWN 
AS THE FLORIDA PEOPLE’S COALITION (FPC) IS A STATE-WIDE ORGANIZA- 
TION ESTABLISHED AS A PRESSURE GROUP TO DEMONSTRATE AT THE DEMOCRA- 
TIC NATIONALCONVENTION CpNC) MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA JULY SEVENTY-TWO, 
A MEETIN(^ OF THE STEERING COMMITTEE OF THE FPCJ;^ WAS 
HELD AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI, CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA ON 
MARCH TWENTY-FIFTH, SEVENTYTWO, APPROXIMATELY TWENTY-FIVE, . ' 
REPRESENTING SUCH AREAS AS TAMPA,' TALLAHASSEE, JACKSONVILLE, 

ST'. PETERSBURG GAINSVILLE AND MIAMI, FLORIDA, USING THE ON-CAMPUS 
FACILITIES OF THE WESLEY FOUNDATION, DISCUSSED FPC ORGANIZATIONAL 
STRUCTURE, THE PROBLEM-OF FINANCES, THE ESTABLISHMENT -OF A 
COMMUNICATIONS NETWORK AND THE ACTIONS THAT SHOULD BE TAKEN 
DURING AND AT THE SITE OF THE DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION. 

THE OVER-ALL PURPOSE OF THE FPC IS TO SEEK AN END TO THE 
VIETNAM WAR AND THE ADOPTION BY NATIONAL CANDIDATES 
OUOTE PEOPLE’S PLATFORM ENQUOTE 


END PAGE ONE 











PAGE TWO 


'fir 


MM 100-1659S 


THE MEETING WAS DOMINATED BY THE MIAMI CONTINGENT WHO WERE 
STRONG AND VOCAL. THEY VETOED STRONG ACTIONS AND CIVIL DISOBE- 
DIENCE SUGGESTED AND INSISTED ALL DEMONSTRATIONS AT THE SITE OF 
THE DNC BE PEACEFUL AND NON-VIOLENT. 

IT WAS TENTATIVELY AGREED THAT MOBILE TEACH-INS SHOULD BE 
HELD THROUGHOUT THE STATE PRIOR TO THE DNC AND THAT A STRONG 
QUOTE PEOPLE’S PLATFORM ENQUOTE FOR THE STATE OF FLORIDA BE DEVELOPED. 

WITH RESPECT TO THE DNC A TWO DAY ACTION WAS TENTATIVELY 
DECIDED UPON. ON JULY TWELFTH SEVENTY TWO FROM TEN AM TO NOON 
A RALLY WOULD EE STAGED AT BAYFRONT PARK IN DOWNTOWN MIAMI, THE 
GATHERED GROUP WOULD THEN DISBURSE THROUGHOUT THE CITY TO HOLD 
TEACH-INS and TO DISTRIBUTE LITERATURE DOOR TO DOOR IN THE COMMUNITY, 
ON JULY THIRTEEN SEVENTYTWO THE GROUP AT TWELVE NOON WOULD 
CONGREGATE IN BAYFRONT PARK.. AT THREE PM, FOLLOWING A SHORT RALLY 
THEY WOULD MARCH TO THE DNC CONVENTION SITE ON MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA. 

AT SIX PM ANOTHER RALLY, INCLUDING SPEECHES, MUSIC AND DISTRIBUTION 
OF FOOD WOULD TAKE PLAtE. WHEN THE DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATE IS 
ANNOUNCED THEY WILL SEEK TO HAVE HIM COME FROM THE CONVENTION 
HALL AT WHICH TIME THEY WILL CONFRONT HIM WITH THEIR DEMANDS. 

THE FPC HOPES TO HAVE AT LEAST FIFTEEN THOUSAND PARTICIPANTS AND 
stated TWENTY THOUSAND DOLLARS WOULD HAVE TO BE RAISED FOR 
THE PLANNED ACTIVITIES, •'A ... - • 

END PAGE TWO ‘ ’ 



. t* 

(i > 


PAGE THREE , ' 

MM 100-16596 

ALSO DISCUSSED WAS THE NECESSITY FOR PUBLICIZING THE FPC AND 
ITS PROGRAM, THE DISTRIBUTION OF ORGANIZATIONAL PAMPHLETS, 

POSTERS, BUTTONS AND BUMPER STICKERS AND THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A 

RAPPORT WITH LOCAL AND NATIONAL MEDIA. .j 

OF THE VIETNAM VETERANS 

against the war was PRESENT AT THE MEETING AND GAVE A VAGUE 
COMMITMENT OF SUPPORT OF THE FPC. 

. THE MEETING, WHICH BEGAN AT ONE PM LASTED SIX HOURS. 

IT ENDED ON THE AGREEMENT THEY WOULD RE-CONVENE ON SUNDAY MARCH 
T\?/ENTYSIX- TO VISIT THE CONVENTION SITE AND TO INSPECT LOCAL 
CAMPING AREAS. 

THE ABOVE INFORMATION WAS FURNISHEd| 

BY A. FIRST AND SECOND SOURCE WHO HAVE FURNISHED RELIABLE 

INFORMATION IN THE PAST. . ' 

END PAGE THREE 



3/25/72 


airtel 


(ATTR: research section, 

DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE DIVISION) 

FROM: SAC, MIAMI (80-1353) (P) 

SUBJECT: MIDEM 

Re Miami airtel to Bureau, 3/14/72. 

_ During the weekly meeting of the Dlann-inir 

ITV/llAt . 

SsSn ^oompaaJ“Ler°'' 

to se?T Washington, D.C., had attempted 

consisti^ff ^5® Police Department its service 

So2?i * ^ ^ summary of information appearing in 

various underground newspapers throughout the country. 

+t,__ Washington Field is requested to advise if 

®0“Pany, or any similar service with regard to 
underground papers, is known. regard to 


2 - Bureau (RM) 

2 - Washington Field (RM) 
(X - Miami 
HCB:nlm 
(5) 


U'- 





FEDERAL BUREAU OF I N VEST! G ATTI O N 
FOIPA 

D-EEETED PAGE INFORMATION SHEET 
No Busplicatian Fees are charged for Deleted Page Information Sheet(s^ 


Total Deleted Page<^s) ~ 23 
Page 36 ~ b6, b7C, b7D 
Page 65 ~ b6, b7C, b7D 
Page 68 ~ Duplicate 
Page 96 " b6, b7C, b7D 
Page 97 ~ b6, b7C. b7D 
Page 98 ~b6, b7C, b7D 
Page 99 ~ be. b7C, b7D 
Page 105 ~ be. b7C, b7D 
Page 106 ~ bb. b7C, b7D 
Page 1 12 ~ bb. b7C, b7D 
Page 1 13 ~ bb. b7C, b7D 
Page 1 14 ~ bb. b7C, b7D 
Page 1 15 ~ bb. b7C, b7D 
Page 1 16 ~ bb. b7C, b7D 
Page 1 17 ~ Duplicate 
Page 1 18 ~ Di^licate 
Page 119— Duplicate 
Page 120 ~ Duplicate 
Page 121 — Dt^Ecate 
Page 122 — Di^licate 
Page 222 ~ bb. b7C, b7D 
Page 234 ~ bb. b7C, b7D, b7E 
Page 235 ~ b7D, b7E 



FBI File No. 80-MM-1353 

Democratic National Convention, Miami Beach, Florida, 

Summer 1972 

Section 3 



o 


«H3i0 TP CODE 

1114 PM MITEL 3-,S-72 JDM . 

TO DIRECTOR 
JACKSONVILLE 
WIAMI 

NEW YORK ■ ... 

WASHINGTON FIELD (100-47172) 

from TAMPA (100-2955) 7 PAGES 

ASIIMR rally, march eight, sevemtytwo, umivessity of 

SOUTH FLORIDA CUSF), SPONSORED BY YOUTH INTERNATIONAL 
PARTY - USF, IS - NEW LEFT. STAG, VIDEm', OOlTAMPA. MIDEM. 


A SOURCE WHO HAS FURNISHED RELIABLE INFO RMAT ION IN 

that PAST,, advised ON .march SIXTH, SEVENTYTMO THAT ON ' 

MARCH EIGHT, SEVEMTYTWO AT tma n m 

■ . ’ at TV,0 P.M., A GROUP OF INDIVIDUALS 

AITlTTl TA'Tr’rv 


AFFILIATED WITH THE FLORIDA 

including 


END PAGE ONE 


pe oples PLATFORM COALITION (FPPC) 

from new YORK, 


AND 


■b6 

b7C 





- 


t,' ' o ^ 

PAGE TWO ' , 

|. TP 100-2955 " ,. • 

ARE SPEAKING AT AN ANTIWAR RALLY AT THE USF, TAMPA,, FLORIDA. 
THE RALLY IS BEING SPONSORED 0^3 THE CAMPUS BY THE YIP, A 
' STUDENT APPROVED ORGANIZATION AT USF. THE FPPC IS NOT 
A STUDENT APPROVED ORGANIZATION, AND ALL ACTIVITIES 
, ON CAMPUS MUST BE SPONSORED BY APPROVED ORGAINZAT IONS. 

, SOURCE STATED THAT THE THEME OF THE RALLY WILL BE "ORGANIZING 

^ against the war." 

THE FPPC IS A STATEWIDE COALITION ESTABLISHED AS A 
: PRESSURE "group TO DEMONSTRATE AT, THE DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL * 

i CONVENTION IN MIAMI, FLA. IN JULY, SEVENTYTWO, THE YIP, 

; ALSO KNOWN AS YIPPIES, IS A LOOSELY KNIT, ANTIESTA3LISHME.MT, 

, REVOLUTIONARY YOUTH ORGANIZATION FORMED IN NEW YORK CITY-' 

' IN JANUARY, NINETEEN SIXTYEI6HT. 

i ON MARCH EIGHT, SEVENTYTWO, A SECO.ND SOURCE, WHO HAS 

r FURNISHED RELIABLE INFORMATION IN THE PAST, ADVISED THAT 
AN ANTIWAR RALLY WAS HELD ON THE MALL OF USF, TAMPA, FLA. 

■ at two P.M., MARCH EIGHT, SEVENTYTWO. APPROXIMATELY 
' TWO HUNDRED PERSONS ATTENDED THE RALLY. EDWARD DEATON 
' ACTED AS MASTER OF CEREMONIES. DEATON, WHILE A STUDENT - 
END page TWO 





PAGE THREE . - - > - - ' - - ■ - 

TP 120-2955 

AT USE, WAS A MEMBER OF THE YIP., AND PAST PRESIDENT 
OF THE STUDENT MOBILIZATION COMMITTEE THAT IS CONTROLED 
BY THE SOCIALIST WORKERS PART CSWP) AND ITS YOUTH 
AFFILIATE, THE YOUNG SOCIALIST ALLIANCE CYSA), THE SWP 
HAS BEEN DESIGNATED PURSUANT TO EXECUTIVE 'ORDER ONE ZERO,- 
FOUR FIVE ZERO. 

THE MAIN SPEAKER WAS RENNIE DAVIS, WHO WAS CONVICTED 
OF ANTI - RIOT LAW VIOLATIONS DURING THE NINETEEN SIXTYEIGHT 
DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. DAVIS DISCUSSED THE "AUTOMATED 
AIR WAR”.BEI^3G PRACTICED AGAINST THE; POPULATION OF' NORTH 
VIETNAM BY THE AMERICAN MILITARY THROUGH THE USE OF HEAT 
DETECTING SENSORS WHICH AUTOMATICALLY CALLS FOR AIRCRAFT 
BOMBING WHEN A TEMPERATURE CHANGE IS DETECTED BY THE SENSOR. 
SUPPOSEDLY THE HEAT CHANGE IS CAUSED BY PERSONS PASSING 
NEAR THE SENSOR^ WHICH HAD PREVIOUSLY BEEN PLACED THROUGH 
THE ENTIRE COUNTRY SIDE BY AMERICAN AIRCRAFT. 

DAVIS also advised THE AMERICAN MILH ARY* USES BOMBS^ 
GUIDED BY LASER BEAMS WHICH LOCK ONTO HUMAN HEAT OR 
FAMILY FIREPLACES IN AN EFFORT TO EXTERMINATE THE NORTH 
END, PAGE THREE 




/ 





© 



PAGE FOUR 
TP 100-2955 

1 

VIETNAMESE POPULATION, DAVIS ADVISED THE -ASSEMBLED 
CROWD TO WORK TO DEFEAT PRESIDENT MIXON AND ELECT A 
* PEACE CANDIDATE WHO WOULD IMMEDIATELY WITHDRAW ALL U. S. 

FORCES FROM INDOCHINA AND CEASE THE BACKING OF THE SAIGON 
GOVERNMENT, DAVIS* SPEECH ENDED AT TWO FORTY FIVE P,M, 

- AND APPROXIMATELY HALF THE CROWD LEFT AT THAT TIME.' 

SOURCE STATED THE SECOND SPEAKER WAS SUSAN GREGORY, 

WHO WAS. INTRODUCED BY DEATON AS BEING FROM THE. .AMT I WAR 

UNION, NEW YORK, N,Y. GREGORY ADVISED SHE WORKED MAINLY ' 

IN THE WOMEN’S LIBERATION FIELD, BUT' WANTED TO PRESENT A 

THREE POINT PEACE PLAN TO THE CROWD WHICH SHE SAID WAS 

$ « 

BACKED ,BY THE FPPC. SHE SAID EACH CANDIDATE RUNNING IN THE 

- FLORIDA PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY SHOULD BE CONFRONTED WITH THE 
PLAN AMD ASKED IF THEY SUPPORTED THE PLAN, ONLY YES OR NO 
Aji'SWERS WOULD BE ACCEPTED. SHE 'READ THE PLAN, WHICH STATED 

/IN PART, (ONE), WITHIN. TWENTYFOUR HOURS AFTER INAUGURATION, 
THE PRESIDENT MUST IMMEDIATELY STOP THE BOMBING AND ALL OTHER 
MILITARY OPERATIONS IN INDOCHINA, (TWO), THE PRESIDENT 
MUST IMMEDIATELY SET A DATE FOR THE .COMPLETE WITHDRAWAL 
END PAGE FOUR 



PAGE FIVE 
TP 100-2955, 

WITHIN THRp MONTHS OF U*S* PERSONNEL AND EQUIPMENT 
FROM INDOCHINA* 

(THREE), THE U. S. GOVERNMENT MUST END ALL SUPPORT 
.FOR THE TKIEU REGIME IN SAIGON AND THE MILITARY REGIMES 
OF LAOS AND CAMBODIA* 

■DEATOH* URGED ALL PRESENT TO SIGN THE CITIZENS PLEDGE 
WHICH WAS FURNISHED AND WHICH STATED THAT THE SIGNERS. 
WOULD ASK CANDIDATES TO ENDORSE THE THREE POINT PEACE 
PLAN AND NOT SUPPORT ANY CAiNDIDATE WHO REFUSED TO ENDORSE 


THE PLAN* ALSO. TO ASK FIVE OTHER PErtSONS TO SIGN THE 


CITIZENS PLEDGE* 


■ THE RALLY. ENDED AT THREE TVJENTY P.M. THERE WERE NO' 
INCIDENTS OF VIOLENCE, NO ARRESTS, OR PROPERTY DAMAGE 
DURING THE RALLY* 

ON MARCH NINE, SEVENTY TVJO, SOURCE THREE," WHO HA'S 
FURNISHED RELIABLE INFORMATION IN THE PAST, ADVISED THAT 
AT FOUR P.M., MARCH EIGHT, SEVENTYTWO, A MOVIE WAS SHOWN 
AT THE UNIVERSITY CENTER, USF, ON THE "AUTOMATED AIR WAR"., 
WHICH DAVIS HAD PREVIOUSLY DESCRIBED* IN ADDITION, 




END PAGE FIVE 


•V ‘ 


0 Q 


PAGE SIX 
TP 100-2955* 

/ f 

PROPOSALS OF THE FPPC AS TO THE THREE POINT PEACE PLAN 
WERE DISCUSSED. SOURCE ALSO ADVISED THAT AT SEVEN THIRTY 
;'P.. A TEACH-IN WAS HELD AT THE UNIVERSITY CENTER, ‘ 

SUSAN GREGORY PRESIDING.. SOURCE SAID WOMEN’S LIBERATION 
WAS THE main TOPIC IN THAT WOMEN HAVE TO GET TOGETHER TO 
PLAY MAJOR ROLES IN THE NEW LEFT. ALSO, THE ASSEMBLED 
PERSONS WERE ADVISED TO VOTE DEMOCRATIC IN THE UPCOMING 
i ELECTION TO GET RID OF PRESIDENT MIXON AND HIS AUTOMATED 
,VrAR. IT WAS DETERMINED THAT THE JOB OF THE FPCC WAS TO 

! FIND A CANDIDATE IN THE DEMOCRATIC PART ViHO WOULD BACK THE 

' 

' THREE POINT PROGRAM. 


■b6 

b7C 

b7D 

USA AND SS, TAMPA,* AND MI, ORLANDO BEING , ADVISE. 
ADMINISTRATIVE: TAMPA AIRTEL TO BUREAU, MARCH SEVEN, 

SEVEMTYTWO, ENTITLED, ” "FPPC, IS - ML; OOsTP." 

SOURCE ONE IS * 

SOURCE TWO IS ■ 3370 

END PAGE SIX 


% • 





Q ' Q 

PAGE SEVEN 
TP 100-2955 ' 

* > 

SOURCE THREE IS 

NO LHM BEING SUBMITTED. 

LOCAL dissemination BEING MADE. 

INFORMATION COPIES BEING FURNISHED NEW YORK, MIAMI, 
JACKSONVILLE, AND WASHINGTON FIELD IN VIEW OF THEIR 
INtERESTS IN THIS MATTER. 

NO INVESTIGATION R^IAINS IN THIS CASE IT IS BEING PLACED 
IN A CLOSED STATUS. (C) 

END 


FBI MM JMS 



9 


0 


3/23/?3 


AXI^Zf 

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»IREC50a, 'IBl 

H30GaK3SJTO 'USm PmX (PM)^ 
10 -‘C 

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. . ■ |oa 0/07/72# auivlsed tls^ cttayafoiii iecao 

*!CItalioisso”' rcportcaiy 3Uftlcl« jtancmil^ OT* actloas 

'■fe talisi' plum -mt tba Beaocratiiy Hatioaal Caa?«jatio» (KIC>. 
'Baacii*. Florida itt Jaly'i- 1972*. 


b7D 


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- ' %iiii iraviw ’*Chaile2S0** ^-ofoasatoo. if i-t ;cpi|tfiii»' 

JUjfo3fiaa|l<^ c^a<^ais5 -t!i© WXC *a% !te^ Biori^av 

- 0*. ^laok3&- 'sJateEtiiaa- 

M P& -Mm ^aksed- a^ibas taw tko; KSC,. M^ice Maai oa a 

ii^a«aatiaa' ^avalopod GimtM ho. iMcorpotatc^ iti- sm, 
«ititalila, for ,dlgsekl!kt 


3 --• teoaa--<2 - i#-437e42:)t ' 

' \3» 

0 - nmrowk iz$M47372y 4^% <0a> 
4pr ttmmn - — 


to7D 


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I . j 





1 "■r-r 

‘ilad 

T_ 










orriONAL ponM no. to 
MAY IM2 COITION 

GSA ri*MR <41 cfr) k J 

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

Memorandum 

0 

TO 

ALL AGENTS 

date: 3/24/72 

FROM : 

MIAMI (66-2782) 


subject: 

DEMONSTRATIONS AGAINST 
PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES 



Bureau teletype 3/23/72 to all SACs, advised 
as follovrs : 

’’ReBuaritel to Albany November 2, 1971, captioned 
* Demonstrations During the Forthcoming Political Campaign* 
and Buairtel to Albany February 4 and Butel March 20, 1972, 
captioned *Protection of the President and Presidential 
Candidates.* 

**In vie\? of the fact that Secret Service is now 
providing a protective service to presidential candidates 
HUBERT H. HTO!PHREY, HENRY M. JACKSON, GEORGE MC GOVERN, 

EDMUND S. MUSKIE and GEORGE WALLACE, all offices are to 
remain alert for demonstrations against these candidates. 
Information obtained relating to demonstrations or other 
disruptive activities planned against them during the re- 
mainder of the campaign is to be promptly furnished to 
the Bureau by teletype and to Secret Service locally. 

** Instruct ions set out in -referenced Bureau airtel, 
November 2, 1971, should be reviewed regarding the rejport- 
ing of this information, (1) . 

**Teletypes must be submitted in form suitable for 
dissemination and must contain captions descriptive of the 
demonstration being reported (2) . Threats against any of 
these candidates should be handled in accordance with in- 
structions set forth in referenced Bureau airtel, 2/4/72 (3)." 

(1) Disseminate by teletype which should be 
well prepared, like a concise LHM, with personnel 
and organizations succinctly described^, and with 
administrative data at end. 



1 - Each Agent 
1 - 66-2782 
1 - 175-00 
L- 89-00 
nj- 80-1353 
TfflA/dk 


/3S3-. 


Buy U.S. Savings Bonds Kegularly on the Payroll Savings, Plan 




o 


p 


MM 66-^27^2 


(2) Example - 

Demonstration in Connection with 
Appearance of Presidential Candidate 
(Name) , 

(Location ) , 
on (Date) , 

Sponsored by (Name of Group) . 

(3) In connection with treats, promptly 
notify Bureau, candidate’s office, appropriate 
local authorities. Secret Service locally and 
Washington, D.C. This action must be taken 
whether or not violation over which we have 
Jurisdiction exists. 


2 



V 27/72 


AIETEL REGISTERED Mait 


TOs t3Elf (100-79303) 

PRCMs SAC, MIAMI (157-83) (p) 

RE?s *'00ISSGRESS OP RACIAL EQUADITy (dORE) 

- 'EM ^ ^ ■ 

(00s m) 


Ro Baltimoi:© airtai, *& IHM, 3 / 13 / 72 , and Eulot, S/ 20 / 72 , 


Miatai Chapter: of CC^ has. hhen lhactiyo since 1968 , 
haying severed all ties *with national organization of CC^ 
in 1966 duo to the militant starid tahon hy the national office 
at that timo^ 


On 


b6 

b7C 

b7D 


reported ho 

current acexvity on me parr or coke ana no anrormation regarding 
CORE plans to send delegates to disrupt tho ilational Democratic 
presidential Convention to ho hold in Miami Beach# 

Nevr Yorh: is reguostod t<? projitptly advise Miami results 
of investigation relating to the information sat forth in 
Baltimore IHM of 3 / 13 / 72 * . ' * 


(EM) 

( 157 - 5554 ) 


2 - How York 
1 ^ Baltimore 
Miami 
(1 - 157 - 33 ) (COEe) 
(TO- 80 - 13 SIXMID]^) 
(1 - 
a - 

LCPj ^gm 
( 7 ) 


c/\K 


(Info) (EM) 



b7D 







m 157?-83 


For the information of Haw Yoxfkt Miami mabinits an 
IBM to tho Bureau and interested agencies &f&ry tWo wo^s on 
information re tho forthccraing Democratic National Convention. 
Eesults of Nev/ York’s investigation re this matter v;ilX bo 
included in Mi am i’s IBM upon receipt of the informatit^ in the 
Miami Office. 

NeW York should designate a copy of their investigation 
for Miami file 80-1353 (MIDm) . 



FD-3S0 (Rev. 7-16-63) 





E0,BARGEE 
.HeWitf stafrwfitc>^ 


^ A^iS-wlekfCOuiiidoTO 
,.begunlto_ward ; the Democrat- 

IpromismEhundre^^ per-, - 
, so^;scurryingtaro^und^^^^ 

I roundingSiR:la'^:qKffi ' 

tBahneRtbXfihding^ 
[•yatibns-Vyfor ■‘‘>an, ■,'Mpected‘: 
■50366 visitors.. '■'/ “.. 

(■^Between* now'-^andf |the, 

'Ipening' of tK% 3 p 5 ^^^ ' 

^^!buijt;$itl}5t,3em p6\ ' 
’pulationitli'e ' size of yCoralj Ga-" 


‘ -V » ’ ' J**.* ' '■''' 

;phqnesareisupposf®'tw^^ 

-s'tafe&x'' * ■''''\' r ■ I'’"'' 

' ;©''Cdnventidh^*Hali',l^^ 
two ;w&ks ;bef ore f He.yDfmc^^j 
■•cra3'c’c|nw^^ 
set’35_;an3''being^^^ 
;6oQtinembersXofi.the:'Chu 
■yeark':agOij;but'‘this.'^time/the. :, pf.the Ilazarene;,., : 
cast of ‘Characters will be dif-' 


blK. fln} It^^heypemocraticV 
. Partyvfaithfu| .pom!^ 

„nate.the iexf president of the. 

siistM^t^r" ; ’' 

’- 3’haf is precis^ hp’P:'. 

peftedfihside ,'i the,’ ' rfiammptfe 
Beach CbhyehtibhV.HallifOT^^ 


ffef eht’ ahd'Xthe 'ehpt p specti; 
3leiafgeft 

t' tt T' ■ ►a 

Dup'rig^i-the .next threes 

■jhc5A%,'y39!?/f', ]h'p} Itod' sur-:‘ 
'ipn%¥if youSeeil’.' ”’ 

■ A •telephphe- .worken 
from ., Mpntana^xasliing; directs 
'iions.yto.whe^^ 73,po\tele;= 


\ ’0< A'. ; ;$62300f.. 'secuffty. 
:fence,,partiaUy;hid&^ 

-bisciis bushes,', completely ehf 
.circles .the, convention! cpmr 
pfex'—.'an^y.tj^^^ 
biwnjy wdrK 

*’ ' the crahvent^^^^^ .Clolfl;' * ■■ -• 

’.Alropst 466. ypolice.rneti' 
going., |b' 3 ),a|sef*cy^^^^^^ 

6'lJehdl to,,leaf nmil’about^i 

'^\an3'"ihoutl’dr&W<o^^^^^^^ 

phisVi|af£d‘!w,e^^^^ 

.■nicatipn|' ^uji>%ht.,y /and 
.hardware' hought'^^^^^^ 

'-‘arfunds^^ 

■■ ©..Aigro'up pfjdemoiistrai 
tors' heingj pblitely'-liven,^^^^^^ 

■ fecVions,; by;^36h^ 
area ih;. front of HheHConyenT 
tion. hall' ‘ re'seryedyfpr. their 
, profes^.. " ' ; ' ',■/ ■•-■, 

i ®\ a' group;., of .ypjpfeers 

trying to findfehts.-.fegal ;a^ 
and.' ’ihedi'cal’* assistance for 
what' they 'estimafe* will, "b® 
lOjQOOyto 50,060 Youthfuhyis- 
• itofs,. whomShey calf "n<?n- 
delegate^.”' '■ 

®, Another group of , 200 
to- '400 yoiuhteers' stqphng 
arpund'party ‘.'y^Pf.'ih.^rented ^ 
‘ autompbiles;du'& 


of the cbnve ntioh. 


"■'Itas' ;shaping)upr'h^i^at. 


(Indlcote page, name oi 
newspaper, city and state.) 


1-A 


MIAMI HERALD 
MIAMI, FLORIDA 


Date: 3/26/72 

Edition: 

Author: 

Editor: 

TitioiDEMOCRATIC 
NATIONAL CONVENTION 


Character: 

or 

Classl llcollon; 80-5:3^ 
Submitting Olfice: MIAMI, FLA. 

I I Being Investigated 


r^« A r^ •> -/ 

iri-iAilr. L 


tr' tr' 




kind of qpnvnntuxn . And, per- 
haps as never before, conven- 
tion planners are not really 
certain just how many visi- 
tors to expect. 

“Nobody knows how many 
interested people — curiosity 
seekers, street people, vaca-. 
tioners — will Just come into 
town, be there, because of 
I the convention,” says Ed 
Cubborly, assistant to the 
' Democrats' Convention Man- 
i ;ger Richard Murphy. 

Added to Its other featur® 
vill be the fact that this con- 
'ention will be the fift| 
under newly drawn reform 
rules that are designed to 
I streamline convention busi- 
ness and to make delegates 
more representative. 

, THERE WILL be more 
women, more blacks and 
other minority groups and 
more delegates pledged to 
vote for a specific candidate 
for a certain number of bal- 
lots. 

Delegate selection changes 
mean there will be fewer of 
the familiar convention faces 
— senators, congressmen, 
state and county office-hold- 
ers and veteran party work- 
ers — and more “grass- 
roots" Democrats. 

Gone will be the familiar, 
old roll-call of-the states, the 
District of Columbia', Puerto 
Rico, the Virgin Islands, the 
Canal Zone and Guam, al- 
phabetically, and in its place, 
a roll-call- determined by the 
drawing of numbers. 

Most of the platform al- 
ready will be written when 
the convention opens, and 
much of the hoopla — includ- 
ing the so-called demonstra- 
tions by supporters of candi- 
dates when they are nomi- 
nated also will be 
changed. 

THERE WILL be a 15-min- 
ute time limit to nominate a 
candidate and have all the 
seconding speeches, and any 
"demonstrations” will be de- 
ducted from that 15 minutes. 

With all this in mind, prep- 
arations are getting more far- 
flung each week to house, 
feed and transport delegates 
and other visitors and to get 
the city’s convention com- 
plex ready for what probably 
will be it? biggest challenge. 

“By the time the conven- 
tion opens, we’ll be living 
here,” says Norman Litz, act- 
ing managac-oLXhe. Conven- 
tion Hall. Litz, like most 


other key Beach officials, is a 
veteran of-*t5«r-KS3 Republi- 
can conclave that was the 
city’s first venture into being 
host to a national political 
convention. 

The 1968 convention on 
, the Beach followed by days a 
Democratic convention in 
Chicago that was marred by 
violence, arid it was held in a 
convention complex that was 
. not only new but being fin- 
ished practically up to the 
opening session. , 

THE FACT that it all came 
off without a major hitch 
gives Litz, Police Chief 
Rocky Pomerance and others 
a certain boost in self-confi- 
dence, but it does not dimin- 
, ish the myriad of , prepara- 
1 , tions that will, in a few 
' weeks, become feverish. 

Southern Bell Telephone 
i Co., for example, already has 
, more than five dozen em- 


I ployes working fulltime on 
convention preparations that 
will Include installing be- 
tween 6,000 and 7,000 new 
telephones. Most of them will 
j be in the convention com- 
plex, where a delegate will 
be able to pick up a phone' 
and dial another delegate or 
his wife back in Nebraska. 

IN ABOUT two months, 
more than 600 employes of 
nine Bell systems from as far 
as Montana will arrive to 
help write 10,000 service or- 
f ders, man 40 switchboards 
and install 5,000 lines, 335 
teletype machines, 40 video 
and 200 audio channels and 
300 pay telephones in and 
, around the hall. 

Officials figure that keep- 
ing the convention in touch 
with the world through more 
than 7,000 members of the 
working press and an inter- 
national satellite-assisted 
television audience will re- 
quire more than 423-million 
feet of wire already in the 
ground. 

So far, the only major al- 
teration in the hail has been 
the shell of a wooden struc- 
ture the size of a small 


house. Tricked in a corner of 
the 108,000-s q u a r e -foot 
iSouth Hall, it will he the 
perve center of all commijni- 
fcations. 


BEFORE LONG, it will 


be 


joined by television studios, 
to be built fay the major net- 
works, and anchor booths 
from whicfe-UiaJCJi commen- 
tators will cover the events. 


There are two major twists 
in. all th6 »5!itpemive alter- 
ations that must be done.^ 

One is that less than a 
month before the convention 
I begins, all heavy work in the 
f hall must stop for two weeks 
to allow the 30,000 Church of 
the Nazarene conventioneers 
to hold their meetings. That 
convention already was 
booked into the hall when 
the city began, courting the 
Democrats, and both sides 
are having to compromise so 
both conventions can be 
held. 

The other irony is that, 
within a fpw weete after the 
-Democrats close their con-, 
clave July 14, workmen will 
pull up the $23,000 security 
fence, replace a wall that is 
being knocked out between 
the North and South Halls, 
take apart the $62,000 ros- 
i trum, remove all the equip- 
I ment and, in short, restore 
j the building to a condition 
that will make it almost im- 
possible to believe that the 
j convention ever was there in 
! the first place, 
i IT COST $950,000 in 
I pledges to get the Democrats 
[ to hold their convention in 
I the Beach, and the city of 
I Miami Beach estimates it is 
I p r 0 V i d i n g more than 
$500,000 In goods and servic- 
es. * 

j Almost half that — an es- 
' timated $243,000 — is for al- 
i lowing the party to use al- 
most every nook and cranny 
of the North and South Halls, 
the auditorium, meeting 
rooms rind offices, much of it 
for the better part of three 
months and all of it free of 
rent. , 

Other large items include 
$55,000 tKat the city will 
have to pay into its parking 
fund in lieu of parking meter 
■fees it will not collect in the 
convention hall area. Anoth- 
er $25,000 each is being bud- 
geted for the electric bill and 
for extra security personnel. 

With the bitter memories 
of Chicago — and the satis- 
faction of one peaceful con- 
vention — still fresh, Pomer- 
ance, assisted by almost 
$400,000 of federal money, is 
heading a security force 
whose goal is what he calls 
“the effective and humane 
policing” of the convention. 

TOWARD THAT end, he Is 
using the~ fe 4 ar . a l m money to 
send his 250-man force, plus 


about IQ O Other-Of ficers from 
Metro, the city of Miami, 
Florida Highway and Marine 
Patrols and State Beverage 
Department, to the class- 
room. 

With instructors , from 
Florida International Univer- 
sity and classrooms donated 
by Miami Beach High School, 
three classes a weekend are 
being held'so that officers as- 
signed to all .shifts can |t- 
tend; ’ j * 

1 Subjects i nclude- c ro^ rd 
osychoiogy, intelligence ( p- 
<|rarions, personal defen$e, 
tactical training arid familiar- 
ization with the sophisticated 
weapons, communications 
[equipment and other hard- 
^ ware also purchased with the 
jfederal funds. 

i Pomerance says he does 
not expect violence at the 
convention, but' officials 
admit they are preparing for 
the worst and hoping for the 
best. 

- “If we find out a group 
• ran ts to demonstra te peacd 
f dly,” says one high-ranking 
c fficer, “we’ll even help 
tfiem." 

IN FACT, two areas right 
in front of the convention 
hall have even been reserved' 
for demonstrators, a move^ 
Pomerance feels will allow 
them to express themselves, 
in areas where TV cameras 
can record their dissent, but 
without’ interfering with the 
operation of the.convention. 

.One lorial group already Is 
c-eganizing in an effort to 
ri inis ter to th e needs o f the 
i 0,000 to 50”000 “non-dell- 
fjjtes” it estimates will come 
for the convention. * 

“Our goal is a peaceful 
time in the city,” says Lynn 
Slavitt, coordinator ’ of the 
Miami Snowplow Go. — a 
name the group chose so peo- 
ple would remember it. ; 

“We feel that the problem 
of dealing with these people 
is the whole community’s 
problem,” says Mrs. Slavitt. 
“We know what happened in 
Chicago, and most of that 
happened because there was 
no plannin g and thg re was no 
organization ahead of time.” 



HvoMinCOT 

feenter'^'Tor.-’^ 2175 

'N W-'26jf • S'ty_ Jhe"- ^ouji'-Kas 

interested; several : doz|ii - yoj| 

|un\eers,:Burs^ 

iUttie'su|cg|;in’gw 

|cial support* to hefjTgetftOT 

medical 

file toilets ja'ndld^^^ 

,th"e’' ex^^cfedriy'dutfiful;. .Visi- 
itors. _ ^ ^ ' 

In addition,. 'tile ^ 
|p!aniiin|,^te’’^ 
itjfaining!next;_m^^^^ 
terested^>olunteeSlwh'o^^ 
^questit^^ '7*'^ 

‘ ‘ Cddrdinating tlie:'%|eyi_st{ 
; df> pfiysical! prepfrationlf fdn 
the, conventipn ^is the^^job^of a’ 
jgrqup o| pafj^^ 
ivofunteeiv workersX^fid^ 
sef up.an offiw iilt|fiev^aslt;f 
iffitbn! Federal- 'Safir^^^ 

Eban b'mldingtatd70*^^^^ 

■an Aye.-. . <f ■ ■ 
|f_, -<;^prkihg.J5lbse)y :na? 

IttohaP'partyt®^ 
fspending;.ijnqs^® 
jihythe’Belch,^^:® Host 

f< Spmmitteeji: ylppb^ . J y 

t< ibv.tReuBin. Askew, ;iV- ha 
(ling about 20 ’ differert 
chores, ^ranging’ frqm,-limng; 
up , red^vwhife.'a^dlblue; deS- : 
[rationstfpr the'Ndrth'i*^ 
findinpa' i23woice:'chbif4.tb’ 
sing; the Nattonall AnthenV. 
'and? help., conductor Samni^ 
Speaf'\vith;the musical inter-i 
ludes*:, : '5 

;. IN ADDITION/ they, must. 
'Screeh«2^dbo; names^df' pr^^ 
pectivewolunteers to find* the 
liOOO' or. so, they wdl,needi_to' 
‘||rfdtTO-,'n.?varieV^ ' tasksii 
such .asVthe 200 dqriOOi.whp 
will ’be;.needed“tp clmuffeur' 
VIPs for inost dfrnweekl^ 

___A separate grdupjb search!;, 
ing'fpfdbw^ hqusihg^jfdr 
yquth'ful delegates, ryisit'ors^ 
and f anyone - coming’ te'the 
cbnyentw^^^ who ’'willsndt.'be 
able 'to pay the hdte'frates. * ^ 
./The^ 'Democratic’ !^alipnai| 
Committee in -Washingtoh' is/ 
handling thd' ' 20 , 050 -plus 
fiotel Teserra^^^ i, for'* deje:^; 
gates, randidate'arid party, 
officials/ but .i^ local office 
already hVs sent application's 
,for 1 q w :cbst, 'housing’ to; 
10,000,whq-reque'sted.them.v^^ 
.Mostlof the .housing al?' 
ready found i|,in yhiversity 
[of' Mia|if dormitories, but, 
committee members day they 
;need ...roucl^-.nmco^than has- 
been p’romireS/ ■ _ 


I '' Sbmelfio£llmocrltsihope| 
ajl.ithis>pre^cqn^^^ 
'n&V>yill;.jell\by-t^tim^ 
gaTel-bangihg ’ be^^ 
pemqcratic. m 
mJn-Lawr^^^ 
forecast; 

bi^Md/sucbessfte 
contestedT^ natipnai; cpn-J 
yjntte’njf’ ;fealuim -to 

lj| ?.^inb'st?tixclUn^ahdr^ 

: Ip [gHtrcpmpetiti'pns'- f^^^ thi| 
j pj; jsldehtiai} -npjmdatiqn' 6n| 


aybedhatf -will' ^ 

biiow,' getting thefeirai^l) 
m'like, half. the: fun,; , - 











Transmit the following in 


AIRTEL 


Date; 3/28/72 


(Type in plaintext or code) 


(Priority) 





FROM: 


DIRECTOR, FBI 
SAC, MIAMI (P) 


SUBJECT: YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY (YIP) 

IS - YIP 

Miami file 100-16028 

Bufile 100-448910 

(00: NEW YORK) 

MIDEM 

Miami file 80-1353 

Re Milwaukee airtels to Bureau, 1/14 and 28/72; 
Chicago’ airt el to Bureau, 1/25/72; Bureau airtel to New York, 
2/8/72. 

At the January, 1972, YIP ”pre-conference*^, functions 
decided on included the following: 

1. July 27, 1972, "National Che Guevara Appreciation 
Day", to be held at Miami Beach, Florida, to show solidarity 
with Cuban struggle for liberation. 

2. July 27-31, 1972, "Zippie Party Freek Circus” at 
Miami, Florida. 

These dates do not coincide with the Democratic 
National Convention (DNC) scheduled July 9-15, 1972. 


3 - Bureau (2 - 100-448910) (RM) 
(1 - MIDEM) 

2 - New York (100-162260) (RM) 

2 - Milwaukee (100-19355) (RM) 

2 - Chicago (100-44975) (RM) 
(D- Miami (1 - 100-16028) 

(p- 80-1353) (MIDEM) 

JJM/taw 


slad 






HM 100.16028 
HH 80.1353 


At the January) 1972 , Illlxu>is Zlpple nominating 
convention, the calendar of events indicated the Zippie 
International Freek shovr \7onld be held in Miami, Florida 
July 9.15, 1972, which coincides with the BNC. No mention, 
however^ was made of the ”Che Guevara Day”* 

A ”Che Guevara Appreciation Day” very likely 
would result in a serious confrontation by Cuban elements 
in Greater Miami. Cuban exiles, numbering some quarter of 
a million in this area, have in the past exhibited their 
volatile nature in similar provocative situations. 

As an example, there is presently in Miami a 
Russian research ship. This has provoked the Cubans who 
have staged aggressive demonstrations resulting in arrests^ 
the receipt of bomb threats against the vessel and an 
overflight during which paint was dropped near the vessel. 

In order that Miami might anticipate such 
demonstrations occurring during the DNC, the following 
leads are set forth: 

MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO AMD NEW YORK : 

1. Determine if dates of announced activities 
iU} lUami have been corrected to coincide with, the DNC.' 

2. Determine if the ”Che Guevara”Appreciation 
Day” is still a planned function. 

3. Determine the number expected to participate 
in activities during the DNC. 

Information developed should be placed in an 
suitable for dissemination, with copy for Secret Service 
Miami. A copy should also be directed to Miami file 
80.1353 (MIDEM), a control for anticipated demonstrations 
duri:^ the forthcoming, convention. 



®013 MI CODE. 

11I2PW NITEL 3/21/72 LSK 


TO DIRECTOR (100-448910) ATT: DID 
CHICAGO _ 

NEW YORK 

MIAMI ■ • 

WFO 

FROM MILWAUKEE (100-15948) (P) 2 PAGES 



YOUTH international PARTY (YIP), IS - YIP. • 


RE MI AIRTEL to BUREAU DATED JANUARY TWENTY^GHT, 
LAST, ENCLOSING LHM ,REGARDI NG' YIP PRESIDENTIAL NOMINATING 
CONVENTION, JANUARY TwENTYEIGKT, LAST, CHICAGO.' ' ' 

RE COMMUNICATION SAID 




WOULD PROVIDE MUSIC FOR ROCK GROUP BOEFITS, WHICH WOULD BE 
USED TO RAISE FUNDS FOR F;UNCTI0NS LEADING TO YIP PRESIDENTIAL 
nominating CONVENTION, SUMMER SEVENTYTWO IN MIAMI. ROCK GROUP 
BENEFITS WERE TO BE HELD MARCH THREE LAST, CHICAGO; MARCH 


FOUR 


LAST, MADSION, WISCONSIN; AN D MARCH- FIVE LAST, MILWAUKEE. 

learned 


WAS UNABEL TO GET ROCK GROUPS TOGETHER AND, THEREFORE, 


■b6 

b7C 

b7D 


END PAGE ONE 




^0.-/JS3W 


1972 




V 








PAGE TWO 

FLANS FOR THE YIP BENEFITS OUTLINES ABOVE HAVE BEEN DELAYED 
FOR INDEFINITE PERIOD OF TIME. 

MILWAUKEE IF FOLLOWING YIP PRE-MIAMI CONVENTION 
FUNCTIONS IN WISCONSIN. THE BUREAU WILL BE ADVISED OF ALL 
PARTINENT DEVELOPMENTS. 

END 

l?8 

FBI MIAMI WTC 

* - ' 

TKS AN CL ' 

. t _ " 





^Rev. 5-22-64) 


Date: 3/29/72 


Transmit the following in _ 
TELETYPE 


PLAINTEXT 


TO; NEW YORK 
Sf^<L. 

FROM: MIAMI (80-1353) 


(Type in plaintext or code) 

NITEL 

”T; pi Priority) 


MIDEM 


ON MARCH TWO NINE, SEVENTYTWO, SERGEANT 
MIAMI BEACH PD, ADVISED AS FOLLOWS; 

l oCTOGON TOWERS, APARTMENT 
BUILDING OPPOSITE ENTRANCE TO MIAMI BEACH CONVENTION HALL 
raERE SEVENTYTWO DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION (DNC) WILL 
BE HELD, FROM JULY TEN TO JULY FOURTEEN, SEVENTYnVO. 


ON MARCH TWO EIGHT, SEVENTYTWO, 



ADVISED 



HE HAD BEEN APPROACHED BY A GROUP OF PEOPLE WHOSE SPOKESMAN 


JDENTIFIED HERSELF AS 


NE^V YORK CITY, AND 


‘A NEW YORK DELEGATE TO THE DNC. SHE PLACED ONE THOUSAND 
dollars DOW ON RENTAL OF APARTMENT IN OCTOGON TOWERS FROM 
4UNE FIFTEEN TO JULY FIFTEEN SEVENTYT^YO AND INSISTED ON 
APARTMENT OVERLOOKING CONVENTION ENTRANCE. SHE WAS GIVEN 


<WjCB:ajv 
/ ( 1 ) 


Approved: 


Special Agent in 


Searched. 

TndexecL 

Serialized 




m.- w <\S‘- 


.M Per 

?S)3VERNMSNTPRlVraNO OFFICE! I971-4I3-I3S 







FDg^Rev. S-22-64) 


Transmit the following in 


(Type in plaintext or code) 


MM 80-1353 
PAGE TWO 


(Priority) 


FURNISHED THIS INFORMATION SINCE 


HE HAD NO WAY OF VERIFYING IF 


IS A LEGITIMATE 


delega; 


MIAMI BEACH, ADVISED THAT 


:OULD NOT BE DELEGATE 


SINCE NEW YORK DELEGATES NOT YET CHOSEN. 
MIAMI INDICES NEGATIVE RE 


NEW YORK CHECK INDICES AND CONDUCT DISCREET INQUIRY 


TO IDENTIFY 



Approved: 


.M Per 


Special Agent in Charge 


O. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OPFICE', 1971 -413-13S 







Q 


Q 




NR022 NY CODE 

a' 

106PM URGENT 3-50-72 PAG 
TO DIRECTOR 

ATT DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE DIVISION 


MIAMI 80-1553 

FROM NEW YORK 100-175227 IP 





SAC# A^m& 

SAC# -mmt <i 57 - 4 G 0 > i0 


S/20/72 


SCHmS^ CBBiSTIAH J^EBSHir CjKiJ^ipHCE 

<sct,c) 

IS « 0 

< 00 t A'TtAHI'A) 




tacteo a 


I vdl^teeygd iha idXloisiag ddijla^ 

tfitd c<^a© di this cdatacfe, _ 




thO' EeVeJ’cad: MlUm &WSMNmx ws, Xn uxasiSL pn aaycn *»<-» 
with a Eo^d aittiatdrial group and would fee j^ossat 



- Atlanta ,<l^> , . 

- Staton aG 7 -lSS 0 ) icm) < 3 P> 

<» Hiaal (1»1S7*«4 MjI — 

d-157-2934) ^ 

iS;>sQ-i353> imtim} . I 
:a-.t57-3679) <CAP)' lt\, 


S^rfsiiz,© 
fll^d 



r 








0 


MU i57--480. 

in llioai on at least tfco following 4ay at which tlise hS 
1^3 cchienloa to apj^aaf at the :^iendshi£» Uis^iomry 
S^aptist Church,, 740 XI^W,, 5Cth Street* She cai4 part ^ 
4ESmia7S7's purpose in. vSMlpin^ UiJtmt '^s to Stimulate 
interest in the sciiC* 




DICLASSIFICATIOH AUTHORITY MRIUID FROH: 



In Reply, Please Refer to 
File No. 


FBI AUTOMATIC DECLASSIFICATION GUIDE 

0Z-07-Z01Z 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 


FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 
Birmingham, Alabama 35203 
March 24, 1972 


Group i 


Exoludodvfrpjjr' automatio 

downgradiW^nd 

declass^fica1>ion 


DEMONSTRATIONS DURING THE IBMOCRATIG 
NATIONAL CONVENTION, MIAMI, FLORIDA, 
JULY, 1972 


A confidential source, who has provided re- 
liable information in the past, advised that during th e b6 

b7C 

Stated that the Young Workers Liberation League (.YWLLJ b?D 

plans to join with other "movement" grpups and demon- 
strate during the Democratic National Convention. Black 
further advised that the YWLL plans have not yet been 
finalized and it is unifnown as to -the YWLL’s specific 
plans and number of participants. 

The Young Workers Liberation League 
' (YI'JLL) is a front organization of the 
Communist Party, USA (CPUSA). It was 
formed as .a Marxist-Leninist youth 
group in February, 197b, 

Carolyn Black was elected to the Central 
Committee of the YI*7LL in Chicago, " ' 

Illinois on February 8, 1970, 


t! 0 N F I D E N T I A L 

Excluded from a^kmatic down- 
grading and decl^sif ication 







FD-323 (Rov. 1 1-29-6J) 



File No. 


o 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 

Birmingham, Alabama 35203 
March 24, 1972 


Title young workers LIBERATION LEAGUE 
(YWLL) 

f 


Character INTERNAL SECURITY-YOUNG WORKERS 
LIBERATION LEAGUE 

Reference 

Letterhead memorandum dated 
March 24, 1972 at Birmingham, 
Alabama. 

All sources (except any listed. helow) whose identities 
are concealed in referenced communication have furnished reliable 
infomation in ..the past. 





This docurnont contains nolthor rocommondatlons 
of tho FBI and Is loaned to your agency; It and It 
your agency. 


nor conclusions of the FBI. It is tho properly 
s contents are not to be^dlstrlbutod outside 



FO-36 {Rev. S-22-64) 

ALL IHFOKf'IATIOl CONTAIMED Q 
HERE II IS UNCLASSIFIED 

DATE .. 02 ^ 0 7 ^2012 BY 60322 UC/LP/PJ/EH 


Transmit the following in 


AIRTEL 


F B 1 


Date: S/2&/72 


(Type in plaintext or code) 

AIRMAIL 

(Priority) 


TO: DIRECTOR, FBI (100-455711) 

FROM; SAC, BIRMINGHAM (100-5745) (100-6226) (P) 

YOUNG WORKERS LIBERATION LEAGUE' 

IS - YWLL 
Op4-Hf®W^RK 

MIDEM ) 


Enclosed for the Bureau are five copies and 
for Chicago, Miami and New York two copies each of a 
LHM concerning YWLL plans to participate in demonstra- 
tions during the forthcoming Democratic National Con- 
vention, Miami, Florida, July, 1972, 

' The attached IHM is captioned only “Demon- 
strations during the National Cdtx^ntion, Miami, Florida, 
July, 1972“ in compliance with Bureau instructions con- 
tained in Bureau airtel to Albany dated 2/22/72, cap- 
tioned “CALREP MIDEM“. 

The c onfidential source mentioned in the 
attached LHM is I Uiose original inf ormation is 

contained in 

i 

Dissemination of the attached IHM is being 
made locally to U. S. Secret Service and appropriate 
military intelligence agencies, Birmingham, 


4 - Bureau (Enc.“5) 

2 - Chicago (100-41997) (Enc. 2) 
23 * Miami (Enc, 2)* 

New York (100-167699) (Enc, 2) 
4 - Birmingham 
2 - 100-5745 
2 - 100-6226 
WICT:baw 
(14) 


1 SEARCHEO...^. 


,IE5DEX£D. 


Approved: 


‘/mo 



Special^genl in Charge 

7 • 









KH 100-5745 
BH 100-6226 


The attached LHM is class ified confid ential — 
because of information furnished bv I ^ ^ I Disclosure 

of this information could conceivably impair effectiveness 
of this informant. Such an impairment could have an ad- 
verse effect on the national defense interest of the 
United States, 


The source used to charactearize 


xs 


be 

b7C 

b7D 



; 




i\ 


2 






“ •- OrriONAl- TORM NO. » 

.MAYIK2EOmOt>r< 

* CSAFPMR(<rCFR).lo'>*«-* 


ALL DIFOKKATIOW COHTIII-IED 
JB|EDI IS U1JCLA33IFIED 

02-07-2012 BY 60322 -TJC/LP/PJ/KH 


UNITED STATES GQYERNMENT 


TO : 

SAC 

FkoM : 

sa[ 

SUBJECT.: 



■SM • 


SAC, liiAur (i6ort&is4y <p> 


date: 


3/30/72 


Tlbici; afailowiag ia ^dcordedl io got out iafftymi ttaii 
odiiAiiied ^cccatly .concerning thd activities bf l 1 in 
additibn to tiiat set out in Hiaai nitols dated 3 / 24/72 and 
S/27/7^X ' ' ’ " ' ■ , 


lQg [ 

infomatioa In] 
in Mianl 'since I 
in 


mit. 


a courco trho ha 


jroliabie 
J tad Ms been 
ioe to bo active 
Ee is. Iregaent ly 


[has boon intorviowod by 

Eiaai Pol4c.e Mpartffieat intelligence 


Daning discussions concoi 
forthedning Dopecnatle l?rtnTrnntidn>[ 

is hoped that \ teill 

Eo has dentionod p lans to haye 1 


?nepaMtions for the 
Ms indicated that it 
fe for that occasion^ 



1. - i00rl62S4 
1 -• 100rl6S40 ^WAT?) 

1 - 100-16573 <SN0t?PL0^)- 
0- 6(^1353 (D32^E) 





50i0*«0»*'03 


Buy U. S. Savings Bpnds Btgularly' on 'the Bay roll Savings Blan- 




On S/27/72, this s?mo soured, f urnished- the folidwihg* 
-additional infdriaatioht ‘ ^ 

' \ Katf attended 1 _ 

I *groa O ooiaQnts .laade - -Li; tgaa indinntftd 

thotl and l l as ■well as 

l^d aecospanied hiia. . 


^eek hut I 

Interview^ 


Jtyas contacted byl Idurlng the . 

did not indiOato the purposo dr results of this 











4 


m 10p-16i234 ^ : 

JTQliSYlS^L SOUECE AgaiNIS^TlVg PAGE 


Source of Ithis inf oajnation ^as 
(protectod by roquet) 



Covcr.Shect (or Informant Report or Material 
PD-306 (Rev. 9-30-69) 

O 


o 


to 6 

to7C 

to7D 


Date prepared 














I t 


I I conferences were 

Held by the Florida Peoples Coalition(FPC) ta 3 s=OTfcd 
at the Wesley Foundation, University of Miami, Fla. 
The leader of the ‘conference agenda v/as FRi\NCES from 
Tampa, Fla. FRANCES is a pretty, young V 7 hite female, 
about 5 4" tall, blond hair, brox-m eyes, and “^lender. 
'Other persons attending v;ere as follows: 

about 20 years old, xdiite male, 

5 8 tall, slender, dark brox-m hair. h1iiP> and 

mustac he . He resides at 

telephonel ~ and is ~h * 



e conference in Miami 


, ,1 I is a v/hite female, early 20’ s 

5 tall, stocky build, long broxm hair, brox-m ev es 
and wpor«s wi -ra g lasses. ‘ She resides wil-.hl 

J at 

Telephone 

I ^ I x7ho is a x^hite male, early 20 ’s 

long dark hair tied in a ponytail, dark bea rd, and 
mustache, 5 ’9”, slender build. He drives a I 
automobile bearing current Florida license I ~ 



ley drive a[ 

cxirrent^Florida License 


autom obile bearing 

l is a X'.’hite male. 


,6' 2", slender build, medixmi brox-m hair, tied in ponytail, 
and long to his x^aist. He v;ears horn- rimmed glasses. 







o 





His wife, | 
olive complexion, 
brovm eyes. 


is a white female, about 5 '3**, thin, 
and has thin long dark hair and 


b6 

b7C 

b7D 


J white male, in his early 20' s, 

6' 3", to 6 '4", medium build, mustache, light eyes, 
long blond hair, balding on the top. 

* « * 

^ LNU. v;hite male, 5' 7", stocky build, 

curly black hair, brovm eyes, Latin appearance. 


* 


1 white male, in early 20' s, 6*1" tall. 

slender build, 
length and full 

blue eves, dark bro^-Tn hair, shoulder 
beard and mustache. He -is from! 1 


1 but originally 

came trom 




[ 


I (LNU) . v/hite male, in early 20' s, having 
blond curly hair, tied in ponytail, a mustache and full 
beard, dark blue eyes^, 5*9'*. r.n ‘S'lO", med ium build 
and very dirty in his dress! lis from 


and lives with a girl named ]_ 




mentioned above. 


I(LNU) prett 3 ^ ^diite female, about 
5 '8", heavy ouiia, long bro^-m hair, blue eves , and 
has acn e scar tissue on her face. She resides! 


I j white male, in early 20' s, 

curly long OrovTn, tied in a ponytail. He has full 
beard and mustache, about 5 '10", slender build, blue 
« eyes, and his very dirty appearing. 




. Vietnam- VpterAug 

Against ‘fHeT7ar~(WA!7)~at~GaInei^^le, Fla. 


was with a V7hit ^ female , about 5 '4", s.lender build, 

^and this girl did not parti- 


long dark hair. . 
cipate in the meeting, but v;ere there for approximately 
one hour on Saturdaj^. They were .not introduced to the 
group. Another member of the WAI-7 V7as said to have’ 
been at an FPC meeting about three weeks prior to this. 







(3 


.0 


© 


,His Kame V7as ment j.oned as 
ghr>Tt-- fah 


and he was described 


It is noted that a girl named 




1 andl 1 traveled together ir 

L 

on 

car 

1 1 automobile fromi 1 

Ito attend this 

.conference. | 

1 


V7as a 


di d not retu rn with the group in the car to 


bn I however, ii 

t is understood that 

did return in this car to| 




The main topic at the conference was FPC 
activities between- the present and the Democratic 
National Convention to be held during July, 1972 in 
Miami, Fla. FPC hopes to have about 15,000 persons 
' demonstrate in Miami during the convention. They hope 
to raise at least $15,000 to finance this demonstration. 

The follov7ing items were discussed as possible 
activities by FPC: 

A "telephone tree" is to be organized. This is 
a list of persons who will be alert for information 
pertinent to the organization. This information will 
be passed from group to group and attempts made to 
■organize demonstrations against events hot to the liking 
■ of the FPC. 


in[ 


FPC in_ obtaining 


Contact is tn bp, m^gda with af 
V7ho is with I 


tPH) 


and can aid 


V7ith 

obtaihxng 


Contact is also to be made with a 


(pk7 


who it is felt can aid the FPC in 


A week prior to the convention a V7eek of 
education will start to help finalize the plans for the 
FPC demonstrations. Handbills and leaflets V7ill be made. 


Short -rallies were discussed and plans V7ere 
discussed for having marshals to police the FPC demon- 
stration. 


b6 

to7C 

b7D 


f 

1 . 







o 


Senior citizens in various Florida cities 
are to be ccxtacted for money donations; liberal 
teachers and professors in various schools are to 
be contacted to obtain their backing and publicity 
for the FPC demonstrations. 


I "Three Point 

Program" V7ill be presented to candidates and attempts 
made to obtain their comments for approval. These 
points are as follows: 

The President of the U. S. must immediately 
stop the bombing and all other military operations 
in Indochina. 

Simultaneously, the President must immediately 
set a date for the complete withdrawal within three 
months of U. S. personnel and military equipment and 
end all support for the Thieu regime in Saigon and 
the military regimes of Laos and Cambodia. 

*■ , 

The Congress of the U. S. must cut off all funds 
for U.S. military involvement and support for the mili?. 
tary regimes in Indochina. 

, V 

Tens of billions of dollars nov7 appropriated 
for vzar and militarism should be redirectted to meet 
the urgent human needs of people for jobs, adequate 
income, housing, , health care and education. 

'e 

We believe that all candidates for office and 
delegates 'to the Democratic and Pvepublican conventions 
should commit themselves to this Candidate’s Pledge. 

On 7/13/72 leaflets and handbills are to be 
passed out and short rallies are to be had follov7ed 
by a march^ to the convention hall starting about 
6:00 PM. 





bo 

b7C 

b7D 


o 



pLs to contact 


of St. 


b 

■b 


Petersburg, Fla. to attempt to organize an FPC 
group in St. Petersburg. ■ This group is to v;ork 
through the Sunshine Resistance in St.; Petersburg, 
Fla. 


A group of FPC existing in Orlando, Fla. 
was mentioned, but no one from this group was at 
the Miami, conference. 


[ 


and 


] made a tape 


shov7ing their backing of the FPC project, and asking 
to' be kept informed of FPC activities. They men- 
tioned in this tape that they thought that there was 
a power strugg le between various FPC groups in th e 
state. Iresides i-n I ' 


Her telephone number xs 
address is not knovTn. 


On I 

Tampa group of the FfC 


tour- was made by the 


It v;as apparent that| 

is the leader of the State FPC group ana as sucn 
the Tampa group is leading the activities of all 'other 
FPC groups. -It was also apparent that the Tampa members 
of the FPC ”tum on v/ith grass.”. 


Washington. D. C. over the weekend of^ , 

' This made some 


ani 


members of the FPC at the conterence very angry. 






AUEmih 


DXBECTOS, mt 


mmz SAC», Tm9k <100-2045> w 


/(//Ok 


WimWA iiiOPUSS PMfFCma COtoTI<^ (FPPC), aka 
IS -• 13EW I£FX 


Bnclosad herewith fear l l i aBi and Jacksonville 
are two copies oach e£ aa g p-30S« dated 3/28/72> reiloctias 

ved by SA 


fcr' tr' tr' 



f -- 


f 


0-9 (I?*y. 5::lg;7i) 


TVansmit in Via , 

(Type in plaintext or code) 


(Priority) 


3/31/72 


To/ SAC, Miami (80-1353) 


From; Director, FBI (100-469601) 


MIDEM r 

(INFORMATION CONCERNING 


ReMMtel 3/29/72 and NYtel 3/30/72 both captioned "MIDEM.’* 

This confirms telephonic advice given SAC John F. Morley, 
New York Office (NYO) , by Bureau 3/30/72 that on basis information 
available no Investigation of Langley should be conducted. 




Miami should promptly incorporate information in its 


referenced teletype into an LHM and furnis h same to Bur. 
Setaret-Servirce^jLocailtyT — lucludirtn juum statement that 


the files ft 

of the FBI as well as t he negative results o£ check with NYCPD as 
reported in referehced~New York teletype. 


Utilize above caption 4-n cover;] 

Bureau files negative concerning 
limited information available. 

1 - New York (100-175227) 


I name only in LHM. 
Ion basis of 



A A 







In Reply, Please Refer to 
File No. 


(y 


DICLASSIFICATIOII AUTHORITY DERIVED FJlOH: 
FBI AUTOHAT I C DECLASSIFICATIOIJ GUIDE 
TK 02-07-2012 




U^TTED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 
FEDERAL BUREAU OP INVESTIGATION 

Wash'iiigton , D. C.*' 20535 

- March 31, 1972 



PEOPLE'S COALITION FOR PEACE AND JUSTICE 
INTERNAL SECUR ITY - NEW LEFT 

zipf/ 

People's Coalition for Peace. and Justice 
(i'CPJ) is .seif^described as a coalition 
of over 100 brganizhtions dedicated .to the 
elimination odf'viar, racism, and imperialism. 


The fo] 
29. 1972. from 

[lowing information was received on March 





On I 


Washington. D. C7 


mee tings of 

1pr»PT Violfl Qf 


mm 


/ 


Among those present at one or more sessions were 
the following; 





* r 




r I * .'U7JS 


o 


PEOPLE'S COALITION 


Wisconsin Conununist Party (CP). 

i 

The CP has been designated a subversive 
organization by the Attorney General under 
Executive Order 10450, 

of trade Unionists 

for Peace, an organization 'which has 
demonstrated in the past against the ■war 
in Vietnam. 

CP, USA member. 

of Quaker Action 

Group, V7nicn nas aemonstrated in the 
past against the ■s^ar in Vietnam. 

Harrisburg Defen-se Committee, 
a group which has demonstrated in support 
of those persons indicted for conspiracy 
to raid draft boards, blo'w up United 
States Government buildings, and kidnap 
a United' States Government official. 

War Resisters League, a 

group v?hich has demonstrated in the past 
against the Vietnam war. 

~l Episcopal Peace Fellowship, a 
group which has demonstrated in the past 
against the Vietman war. 

Fellowship of Reconcilia-- 
tion, a group which has demonstrated against 
the war in Vietnam. 


COlTOQ 






o 


o 


PEOPLE'S COALITION' 






Yoling Worker’s Liberation 


League (mi). 

YWLL was formed at a convention at 'Chicago 
on February 7-9, 1970. This* organization will 
establish chaptersfor the purpose of educating 
youth in Marxist-Leninist doctrine, hopefully 
to develop them for membership in the Communist 
Party, USA. 


YWLL 


World Peace Council 


The World Peace Council was formed at the 
conclusion of the Second World Peace Congress, 
held in Warsaw, Poland, November 16-20, *1950, 
under Communist initiative. It continues 
today as a major international effort to 
discredit the United States. 


I Women’s International League for 

Peace and Friendship, _ a group which has 
demonstrated in the past against the Viet- 


nam war. 


■b6 

b7C 


/ 


] formerly associated 


with May- Day Collective (MDC) , at TOC, now 
defmct. 


MDC is self-described as a revolutionary multi- 
issue organization arising from the May, 1971, 
demonstrations at TOC. 


- 3 - 





o 


o 


PEOPLE' S- COALITION 



Committee of 
Liaison with Families of Servicemen Detained 
in North Vietnam (COLIFAM). 


to7D 


The major decisions reached at' the conference 
■\-jere as follows: 


1. No additional demonstrations will be supported 
or planned for during May, 1972, in WDC. 

2. Maximum publicity will be given to the ■ 

demonstrations planned by the Harrisburg / 

Defense Committee 'at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, 
week of March 29, 1972. 

3. A mailing will be prepared by PCPJ based on 
research on the air war in Vietnam, and 
political repression and t he political ^ 

■' .r .situation in South VietnamI 
-'¥'1 




Other items of discussion included: 



A proposal by the Florida People's Cdalition that 
PCPJ support their plans for ;demonstratiavs ,du.r,ing the 
Demobratlc National Convention at Miami, -Florida, August 
1972, This was Lakeu uxidei. advlsemerrcT ~ 


A proposal that PCPJ, in conjunction with the^ 

San Francisco affiliate, mount a .-major demonstration^ 
in the San Francisco-S^ Jose area in early May, 1972, 

Dates of May 13 or June 10 were mentioned. It appeared c 0 


other dates might 
other activities. 


be ruled out because of conflict with 
agreed to call PCPJ in 



- 4 - 




y, 



PEOPLE'S. COALITION ' 


San Francisco to check out a suitable date. 


It was announced that 



March 29, 1972, to meet with members of the National 
Liberation Front (NLF) delegation to the Paris peace 
talks . 





It iflas annomced that the demonstrations previously 
scheduled for Air Force installations May 15-20, 1972, 

•will be held May 20, 1972, only. 




FBt. n Js t;,3 

's lasnsd -to your : 
K and its contents are not 
iTsirSrvted outside your agen 





u n 








i r 


O 


WO 100-51888 


The LHM is ciassiti^a — 

"CuuridtJii Lial' *-i 3 ecause disclosure of the mformaticai vould 
be prejudicial to the defenS;e interests of the United 
.States.* ■ * , 


.- 2 - 





conp: 



JTIAL 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 


DICLASSIFICATIOIJ' ADTHORITY' DIRIYID FROM 

FBI JjOTOlttTIC DECLASSIFICATIGH GUIDE 

DAT|^^-0 7-201 Z • 


FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 
New York, New York 

In Reply, Please Refer to M&rCh 3'lj 19T2 

FUeNo. Bufile 100-448092 
NYflle 100-160644 


Vietnam Veterans Against The War 


The Vietnam Veterans Against The War 
(WAW) is a national veterans organ- 
ization with a National Clearinghouse 
located at 25 West 2^th Street, New 
York City (NYC). Its first published 
objective is "to demand an ipaediate 
cessation of fighting and a withdrawal 
of all American troops from Indochina". 

On March 24, 1972, a confidential source, who 
has furnished reliable information in the past> furnished 
the following information concerning activities at the 
National Clearinghouse of the WAW in NYC during March, 1972, 

The WAW no longer has a National Office of a Na tion- 
aL Executive Conmiitteeo The fourth floor at 25 Vfest 
26th Street, NYC, which formerly housed the National Office 
and the office of the New York Region currently is used as 
the office of the National Clearinghouse and the New York 
Region. 


The- National Clearinghouse was created at the 
. ' National Steering Committee meeting in Denver, Colorado, 
during February 18-21, 1972, and its functions are to 
publish the WAW paper, "First Casualty" and a WAW newsletter. 


The following individuals are currently operating 
the National Clearinghouse of the WAW: 


COmpENTIAL 
GROW I 

Exc^ded from automatic* 
downgrading and 
d^l^sification. 


Ihis document contains neither recopnendations nor conclusions 
of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).,, It is the property 
of the FBI and is loaned to your agency; it and its ^cpnteAfeP are 
not to be distributed outside your" agency. ^ ' 

' ® SEARCHED 

SERIALIZE0_^FI|.£0-.i5^ 






© 


1 

f 




Vietnam Veterans Against The War 


i 


She is from the Denver, uojLora 
female, about 23 years of age, 
small build, long brown hair. 


Jof the "First Casualty 
ao area. She is a white 
five feet, 100 pounds, 
wears, glasses. 


! 


I also known as 

I are distributors of 

Casualty" . 


'■First 


is from Denver, Colorado. He is a white 

male, six feet, 200 pounds, in his raid 20 ’s, heavy builds 
long dark brown hair, heavy dark brown beard . 


with the 


had at one time been associated, 
VVAW in' Arkansas, but r.enentlv ha,d been working 


is a \4iite male. 


.with the WAW in Austin, Texas. 

about 28 years of age, brown short hair, about five feet 
eight inches, medium build. 


is from Seattle, Washington area. 

He appears to be an Oriental. He is about 28 years of age, 
five feet ten inches, medim build, long brown hair, wears 
glasses. 


Also v;orking at the Nati onal Clearinghouse as a 

I a white female from NYC, 
about 20 years of age, rive reet seven inches, about I80 
pounds, heavy build. 


The following persons have been observed working 
at the New York Regional Office of the WAW> during March 

1972: 


wew xorK Kegion 


for the 


Regional Coordinator for Vietnam 

f 


[formerly of the Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, WAW 


be 

b7C 


I 


2 




CON]^^f^^^L 


o 


© 


Vietnam Veteran Against The War 





It was learned 


was at 

that time iri' 


Japan, apparantly working on sending WAW members to Hanoi, 
North Vietnam, during the Spring of 1972. 


b6 

b7C 

b7D 


The main activity at the National Clearinghouse 
during March, 1972. was the preparation of a new edition 
of "First Casualty". It is ready for the printers, but 
has riot been printed inasmuch as over $1000 is needed for 
the jpb. 

A National Steering Committee meeting of the 
WAW will be held at Houston, Texas, during April 7-11^ 1972. 
The location in Houston is riot known. The purposes of the 
Houston meeting are as follows:: 

1. To determine the new location of the National 
Clearinghouse. Those persons currently working at the 
National Clearinghouse desire to move it to the mid-West or 
possibly Denver, Colorado. 


2, To choose those members of the VVAW who are 
to travel to North Vietnam during the Spring of 1972. Each 
region of the, WAW have been requested to furnish the National 
Clearinghouse with names of two VVAW members as possible travelers 
to North Vietnam for the WAW. 


3. To determine the future political activities of 

trie WAW. 

4. To determine the extent, of the participation of 
the WAW at demonstrations at the Republican and Democratic 
National Conventions at San Diego, California, and Miami, 
Florida, respectively, ar^ at other demonstrations during 
trie spring and summer of 1972. 

On Marcri 28, 1972, source furnished copies of WAW 
Newsletter, dated March 14, 1972, and a list- of the Regional 
Coordinators of the WAW as of March 7> 1972. Copies of these 
documents follow. 





Jt ' V 

11 * 




© 0 

VIETNAM VETERANS AC3AINST THE...WAR 
National clearinghouse 
4th Floor, 25 West 26th 'Streeferr 
New York, New York lOOlO , 

. ’ , (212) 725-5680 

' ■ ■ ' ■ VI' '■ ' ;■ •> . . ! 





NEWSLETTER' of Mdrch 14; ■1972 • 

— 7r -v.r> :' . .. ... . v ■. 

1* From Wisconsin . "The V7isconsin Region hereby proposes* 1) -That 
National .Speakers Bureau be set up for fund-raising and publicity. 
This:^will'' enable tfte 'former -N^ "york' Off ice..\personnel,^^ (i.e> 'Al‘ Hub- , 
bard; jpe UrgO, Larfy Rottman/ ‘ Jon-Birch/ and others who ’qualify) 
to continue ^'their-;tra veiling- and speaking activities' for ,WAW>. '■ In 
this \^ay;-''the'lCl6aringhqUse'^wili-easily{-be able to set dates,:, ^ 04 : . 

they aren’t conrU'sed— arid the p*edple -\^ih6'''ask for -specific .speakers 
by na^e, cari ^et what they expect. 2) That the .'objectives, be. changed 
to'iipclude'’‘t.H’e two ’’riew ob'jeetiv'es '^roposed by the. WashColoOrg-. Regions i 
’To 'sKoV/' )>ir/ierlcdhs' that - their'/sobiety.- is " structured, .by a sexism whichk . 
promotes inferior'- status'' upon"Vomen';.''4reducing them tb- subservient 
sexual objects of meti. This institutionalized sexism channels women 0 
into' uinfullf illirVg-, lower paying jobs which "are servile* in nature, and >‘V; 
purpose; it ’explbits their bodies -for cex and profit' and. it; degrades i ^ 
and dehumanizes them by a double standard wholly dependent on the 'V.f/ • 
myth of rnale supremacy. This sexism is explicitly exploited by the , . 
milita’ry-, ' officially defining 'servicewomen‘'as subordinate, and. th^^ , ‘ . . 
oughly 'sub jagat'ing theni to nothing more than sexual object's i,* 'a^hd' | 
’To d'eni^d there 'b^'''no distindtions as to types 'of discharges and I , 
that U; 'Single- type. 6f discharg'e'be issued, and that this, be' retro- <* 'it- 
active. '’We' a ISo demand all’ veterans' receive all rights 'and.,benefits,.j;, , 
vt'\der the VA,; and compensation for disabilities be based solely on >> 
the do]g,re.es ..of disability for veterans and their families, whether or 
not s'ervice cbrinected/ and- vdthout regard, to sex, race, rank,' br, : • 

leiigth'bf 'service'i ' . The- w'iscoiisih” region- a Iso. Wants , to add:*. ’.That' we 
must work to 'eduda'te the ^rtierican ;pieople about the hotfors ofi. the Au.to- i- 
mated Battief ibid, due- 'to 'the' complexion of the war in- Indochina.”* 
*Cle.aringhouse’' licit'e's'^ "rhe. objectives quoted above are' from Washington^ • ; 
Cali^ornia-br’e^oH', and 'hot- Colorado. / - / ^ • 

2. ‘''" Fr'Om Wash'ihg*t6h ‘State . In the planning stages still' is. an action 




i'f 

!> 




to ’b4 -Sponsored by WAW Waohington-Alaska in Vancouver, British Colum- 
bia/ Ac cording'' to- Mike Dodrick, "it would revolve around- re-patriation 
and Would' involve probabJ.y guerrilla theatre,'' speaking,' -film showing. 


and a .ttonf’erWhceV ' at v.’hich wa’ could issue' s joint/statement on .so- ; ,/ 
ca tied'-’ * amnesty’’*''. '"'it is expected that conscientious .objectors- who.';;, f;!!.. 
have served their ^.*^0 years a Itsrha'tivd, '-service and draft-^ resistor a 
who fled, in to exile v;ill join our brothers in Vancouver* 

3. FicAm New • York Ed'-Damato p.iropdsefs -that "regions 'nob able tb-submi,t 
their proposal^ ‘in ’titne for'' the three-Wdek deadline .prior to the Housr*,...; 
ton steering committee meeting should submit aJ'''Cqpy of each proposal";- ■. 
to each regional coordinator on the first day of the meeting. • 

4. ♦. From Florida .' Scott -eamil will bd goihg on trial soon' and will 
need all the ' financidl help we can give him; ,0ne way in which he, can 
raibe money-'is by speaking.' If you can book an-engagement for.jhim, at 

a lodal col log's or organ. i:?;at Ion contact the National Clearinghduse or j 
Scott'. ' ■ • ' -"4, — ' (. /..-f/', • ■r.ri 




5. From Indiana . ThorQ'-WiU bo an ^ction-at Torro ^ 

in vhich'V^W'Will participiJtoa ■ It will at Art. at rally 

ersity af 8^ AM, April- 7 and’go: to the; CRANE Depot. a raiiy^ 

will be held and testimonies- on axr war will *233-7151 ’ ' 

ther information ca'll Rich BAQard, 232-6311 ext. 2^04, .or ■ ' , 

e”. • >^cmLouisiaha /--It is •‘suggested that -all 
gates to Hanoi 'setid to the^ Clearinghouse as_soon ®® 

Ihd brief biography of 'each- nominee.: -Include in 

language, capabilities and fluehdi^i, travels, present profession, jUpi^s , 
and areas’ ':^erved- 'in^ 

7. Prom Eastern Pennsylvania . *he brothers who ^ook over the Betsy 

ROSS House during "Operation: Peace on Earuh 20 were 

Five were fined $10.00 each, and the charges on the remaining. 20 were 

dropped. , ■ ' ' . ’ 


S! 


- 5 - 


-*f 


f ‘(Wi. 




© 


.1 ! i« 1 1 ' 


V' c ' 



■i i 


•it 
I P 


Page 2. 


( I 




, '■'•'i 1 '! 1 1', ft 




; 

t 


8, Fifom 1st Casualty Press . Larry Rottman 'says that the first volume 
ov WINNING HEARTS AND MINDS will be available April 5, 1972 to "WAW 
members at a special,. rate.. of .§i,^ 5 .,per;^ 0 opy.' 'j^Nttached is an orjder. 
form for your regionV" ' . vr : ' 

. , , ■ ■> •- . ■ •;■•'• ■ ; ^ t ' •■ ' 

From National Clearinghouse . .^i.Michael McOain left for his trial . ,■ 
»in Los Angeles on March 12. He has ,y;ith thim a copy of the film DEWEY;,, 
IcanYon III and numerous material pertaining' to WAW. He is available y / 
for speaking upon request from regional .coordinators;*; His;vife'i‘rsie^a^y. 
isi torch 12-16 bos Angeles (213) 984-0804/787-7385/785-3527 ' V 

• . f «■ 177^9. .Sa;Ota/,Ba,rbara. ..u .•< ’ ; 

''' j2,o-?^. Hitch-hiking through. Arizona, New Mexico 'Texas, Ok-v^ 

'. , ■, ■■■ ‘ ^ 'lahbrna, ..Arkansas', Tennessee., Kentucky,- Ohio, Fennsyl^^, 

^ *' Vania’, .and Nev; Jersey, back to -New York.'.- 

' •’ J . V ' ' !• -v’/ 

10. Vrom NA^RMIC .' The NARMIC 'Automated A..ir War Slide Show is available 
to regional 'coordinator^ for $25. .00,.- according to Marilyn ttoNal^' of' 
NARMIC).^ The .blank jEojrip is for. .your use.-,. ' 

11'.' .' From the' Farm" Workers . The farmworkers- are in. ser•ious,^t rouble. 
The’x»'’'ve asked for our helo. The enclosed letter should explain what’ 
is happening "If the gov^nment is successful in stopping the "farm*^ , 
workers' .then they will move ' on, ‘to different .areas . • Try.’ to.’ get this 
inforraat'ibh to all members’. soon because the (deadline -foie the appeal ; 
of the ruling x'S,. April 6j. , ‘ . - * . ' ‘.v ’ '‘'•j 




•py 




12. From the VA' . * Here is a telegram sent by. the VA to. all’.'.VA hospit^* 

als on September 24, 1971.’ '.'DM&S CIRCULAR 10-71-221. .-ADMISSION FOR*?-'.-- 
TREATMENT OP DRUG DEPENDENCE ‘THE PURPOSE OF THIS CIRCULAR IS TO RB-EM-" ' 
PHASIZE-'THAT* all ELIGIBLE APPLICANTS FOR HOSPITALIZATION BECAUSE OP 
DRUG DEPENDENCE WILL BE CT-ASSIPIED AS MEDICAL EMERGENCIES AND ADMITTED 
AT OITCE.' ' NON AVAILABILITY OP A, SUIT.ABLE BED- IS NOT AN. ACCEPTABLE REA- - 
SON FOR rHeusing' Admission,, 'eligible applicants viho. -inquire about -v-’ 
treatment for; drug: dependence will be encouraged to accept- HOSPITALIZ- t 
ATiON. if' A Patient; After -admission, requires services not* available 
AT YHE ADMITTiNo STATION, PROMPT ARRANGEMENTS WILL BE MADE FOR TRANS- 
FER T'' AVA” STATION VTHICH.CAN PROVIDE '.THE NEEDED CARE.: -ANY DIFFICUL'J^ 
IN EFFECTING TRANSFER WILL BE REPORTED TO THE- APPROPRIATE -.REGIONAL /V*-' 
medical DIRECTOR BY TELEPHO:.7E USUAL ASMRO - PROCEDURES REtolN IN EFFECT'. 
THIS CIRCULAR EXPIRES SEPTEMBER 24, 1972.“ I- 

“ ' " * A ; 

. , » * , , I /• ^ '• ^ 

13. • From ’Italy. , The.G.I, movement in, the; Italian Army is 'growing. ' 

They 'face, the same oppression that G.l.s around, the world ..face The ■ •, 
present trend is towards coffeehouses similar to those organized -in 
this country s'everal years ago. “ - o ■ 



< 


14. From U.S.'‘*'Atmv IntGlilgoncQ Cornmand , On At>ril 23, ,%969,"thpJJ»&f 
Army Intelligence Command at Port Holabird/ Md, ,• i'asued ;a- secret- In- 
formation Collection Plan"/- directing agents from 300 MI offices xn 
the U.S, to intensify j^urveiilance of civilian-. activity v,. Agents were, 
specifically ordered to place vmder. ..surveillance all strikes and^ labor 
diV^'Utes, all' antiwar and antidraft '‘activities, ..all demonstrations, 
rallies, parad^'s\' _ marches i conventions," conferences and picketing* act*-* 
ivities. Extensive ‘photo-coverage of all activities, including the 
use of telephoto.^ lens,, will be made, identification are to be' 'made': 
of all" personalities involved^ -, or expected tO;become involved in pro-- * 
test activities and to.. dbtali} Information pn the extent of overt -and/v - 
or covert financing. The reports must include the identiflcation*-Of- - 
part’icipatin^' organizations', number of people each can mobilize, de** ’ - 
tails concerning transportation arrangements and housing facilities 
for non-local visiting demonstrators, any indication .of foreigh iX*£ib“* 
.ence^ h]hd any ^^extreraist whose background indicated military training^ • 
in gudrrii’ia ’^ferfareV cdunterinsurgeney or use. of \explosivbS and demol" 
itiona. !]Phls' document is available, at .the U.S. Army i Investigative " 
Record^ kejipsitory 'dr ^-at ' jjjour • local -.underground - riewspaperi .. 


i-V 



- 7 - 



DOP Fom304 this supe^edes all previous eaiciono 


f LW4, fm 


RB&IONRL CQORDINATORS IilST M ’ * 

VIETNAM VETERANS, . AGAINST ■TaE..Mf;;^ 


WASHINGTON-ALASKA., 

Mike Dedrick ' 

, 520 E» Maldeii V 
Seattle, Wash. 96102 
; 206-324-7539 ' *, 

Oregon 

Adrian* Vaainer 
1870 onyx St. #3. 

Eugene, Oregon 97403 
503-344-6633 ' ■ 

CALIF .;:«EVADA-HAWA II • 

.Barry Romo 
PO Box 5154 

San Bernadino, Calif. 92408 
714-687-4303 

COLO .-OTAH-WYOMING 
Gary Mundt 

.847 E. Colfax, Rm. 101 
Denver, Colorado 80218 
303-255-1006 

MONTANA-IDAHO 

TEMP.- Patrick Henry 
PO Box 729 

Mountain Horae, Idaho 83647 
208-578-7474 


N. & S. 
OPEN 


DAKOTA-NEBRASKA 

,» jw ; i, , I • 


TEXAS 

■John Kniffih 
PC Box 12986 . 
Austin, Texas 
512-451-2841 


78703 


OKLAHOMA -ARKANSAS 
Bill Lemraer 
c/o V.V.A.W. 

S.U.P.O. 1392 
Fayetteville, Ark. 72701 
501-442-8496 

LOUISIANA 

Peter Mahoney 
1529'Araelia 

New Orleans, La. 70115 
504-895-7305 



•nf.*’ .. % 


net r 


WISCONSIN' ‘ • 

Buzz Noyes ' 

2594 N. Stowell 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211 
414-964-17951 j 
56?-9371 ■ ' 




iih 

tr-f"'. .Ui 
(V. i 


'f • t •/ 


^ MICHIGAN' ■ ' . • ' 

■ • Bill Marshall 
, 48 Parsons St« _ 

Detroit, Mich* '”4820l>' 
> 313-831-9659 


f 


-^V 


NEW MEXICO--AR1ZONA 
Kris Kristensen ' 

* PO Box 586 , 

1. Placitas, New MexloO i 67043 
, 505-867-2812 ' 


.»T 

r f 

r. 




.1', 


FLORIDA ^ *: 

Scott Camil 
PO BOX 13179 
Gainsville, Fla. 
904-378-0774 . 


1 


! 


32601 > 

i .• ! 

J 'il .• ^ 


^5: ' .» 


MISSIDSIPPI-ALABAMA • •' 
Frank Ang^?:ol» ' • > [‘V 

■ 314 16th 'Sireet Ea^t’- 


i 

•I 


Tuscaloosa-, ‘ Alabama ’34501 
205-345-6773"" • 1 


205-345-6773 

, GBOli:?.IA' 

120 .Garden Lane 
Athens, Ga. 30601. 
404-549-4101'" ‘ 




I 


— 8 — 


N. & S. CAROLINA 

Brian T. O’Connor . 

2105 Walker Ave. 
Greensboro,’ N.C* 27403, 
919-274-3073 ' : 

TENNESSBE-KBNTUCKy i 

C. Wain Rubenstein 
915 North Willett ^ 

Memphis, Tenn. 38107 
901-274-3276 f 


if- 




’4 





o 


o 




^KANSAS-WESTEI^ MISSOURI 
John Musgrave 
PO Box 844 

Baldwin I Kansas 66006 
913-594-3247 

Illinois-Eastern Missouri 
Rich Bangert 
V.V.A.W., PO BOX3149 
St. Louis, Mo. 63130 
314-862-5735 
383-8349 

Minnesota- Iowa 
OPEN 


(Continued 


WA^iTTo .C . -VIRGINIA -BAST ii MARYLA 
Rod Kane 

800 21st St. N.W. 

GWU Student Union, Rm. 23 
Washington, D.C* 20006^ 
202-676-7365 ■ 

OHIO-INDIANA 
Gary Staiger 
PO Box 1625 
Dayton, Ohio 45401 
513-274-4675 


W . MD.-W. PA .-WEST VIRGINIA 
1 Wade Betliner 

3601 Blvd. o£ the Allies 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 15213 | 
412-621-6700 | 




on reverse)' 



- 9 “ 





;r 




'.'V •■'•■■ -v O 


■ - j'.; f.'i 


' i 4 , 1 

■ ‘ r-i- 


•umesMt. ‘'wamm'^r'mw 

Bob Clarke 

106 S. 13th St. ■ ' ?{viDc-3’f’ 

Philadelphia, Pa. 19107' 
^IS-VSS-USO V- }.r s 

•' I ' l.tSfia ii V ■ ;^5V' f •'■i'* ( 

; New OERSEY ,][■.. v',!V./>(»’ 

Gene Halpern 

PO Box 96 ’ ‘ , 

E. Millstone, N.J. 08873 
. 201-359-5595 ’ 

- ■ '!: ■ 'H' " 

CONNECTICOT-HEIHODE 5 ;,., .>3 ‘ 

. Andy Mellor ■ -jW,;. ;; f; 

' 53 Wall St. " ■ ■ ■ ■ 

< New Haven, Conn .06.53.0^, < • ‘rji r 
^ 203-777-3051 ?! .%• 

?' 453-3312 • \ h • . 

NEW ENGLAND ‘ i.- 

Mike Roche 

67 Winthrop St. /■ 

Cambridge, Mass. 02;138. 
617=492-5570 ■ ‘ ' > 

s ■ 

Legislative Office ' .. 

Rusty Lindley 
47 Ivy St. S.E. ' ■ 

Washington, D.C.. 20003 ' 

202-546-46655 \ . 

I:'"*''.' ;'N«^ 

NEW YORK-PUERTO Rico; ].;:..;; 

Ed Domato ' 



( ' ■' ? • 

> , > ~ * -It kk* ^ * 4 I f 

tV jr^« * ‘ »i'* .I.il •*«'*» 

'sy^< ’ U ' iV 




* ■ - M. t :y'. > ’ 

■M--' i ■ I 

■ i . t '• - I ^ i i' ' 1 

/ ,v.. '•/ • II' / 

; • f ^ f t '«f- <> 


k r ;V 'i 


. ' . 7i< ‘ \y- 

rK' 

iiV. ; "> 'V 


VIETNAM 

Robby, Dunne 


25 West 26th Street, ^4t^i^Fi6or V i >- \ 
New York, N.Y. 10010 * , « ‘ ■■' ' 

^'. 1 ; 212^’725-5680 | “-.rC. . ' 

^ .lYV'/'-y V*' 


NATIONAL CLEARINGHOUSE/-' 


< / j '..A 

.. .. > ,|; 




* ' * 

' t loJ' ’ 




■J'.l.'sr' ’.M ,'i •<■'.» v' 1 ! 


- 10 - 


..fiov . I ,, ; j 



CONPI 




Vietnam Veterans Against The War 

Copies of this memorandum are disseminated 
to the Secret Service, 108th Military Group, 

and the Office of Special Investigations of the United 

States Air Force, NYC. 





ALL-* SJFOimTMl-MMTAIlED 
^^iCLASSIFIEI) 

DATE 02f*^0 7^2012 BY 60322 UC/flyi#J/KH 




F B I 

3/3W72 


Transmit ‘the following in 

. AIRTEL 


(Type in plaintext or code) 


(Priority) 


TO: 


DIRECTOR, FBI (100-448092) 



PROM: SAC, NEW YO)^ (100-l60644) 


SUBJECT: TOITNAM VETEMNS 

AGAINST THE WAR (WAW) 

IS-NEW lEPT 

(00:NY) 


ReBuairtel to New York/ 3/27/72, and- NYairtel to the 
Bureau, 3/29/72. 

Enclosed herewith for the Bureau are /twelve copies 
of an IHM, dated and captioned as above, concerning activities 
at the National Clearinghouse of the WAW^ NYC, during March, 
1972. , • 


2 - Bureau (Ends-. 12) (RM) 

3.- Albuquerque flOO - ) (WAW^ (Ends 3) (RM) 


1 fWAW^ fEfads . 2) (RM) 


(1 - 100 - 
(1 - 100 - 
2 - Atlanta (100- 

(i — 100— . ) r 

1 - Baltimore (100- ) (WAW) (End. 1) (RM) 

2 - Birmingham (100- K^WAW^ fEn cls. 2) (RM) 

(1 - 100- ) I [ 

2 - Boston (100- ) (VVAWl lEnci s. 2) (rm) 

( 1 — ' 100— ’ ) I I 

2 - Butte (inn~Qik 7 ) fWAwv YTCnriTa o) (rm) * 

(1 - 100- )| ^ ^ ^ 

2. - Charlotte (100- i l\]\ih\>i\ /hinPis , 2) (RM) 

(1 - 100- ) ' ^ ^ ^ ^ 




COPIES CONTINUED 
1 New York 

jPM:trr 

(-Q0 ) 


Approved:. . 









-ii 2 


Special Agent in Charge^ 

0 .. 


St 


SEARCHED.„..^NDEX£0 — 
SERIALIZEO.j!^ILED..™.^^ 

1972 



■b6 

b7C 





c 


o 


o 


NY 100-160644 


COPIES CONTINUED 


2 - Cincirma'Bi *:(100- 

, r ( 1 - , ;10'0- ) ^ 

.^'5 - Denver (100-1046 7^ rwAuV- 
;i - 100-^' 

1 - 

]l - 100-" ’ 

2 - Detroit (100- 

ii ^100,, ) [ 


limHlJEnels. 2)' (M) 





5) (RM) 


s. 2) (BM) 


* 


'be 

b7C 


2 - Houston (100-12219> (WAW) (Ends. 2) (EM) 

*' - Indianapolis ' ' ' ‘ - 

(1-rlOO- ) ^ 

2 - Jacksonville ^inf - \ /vw au;^ 


3 - Indianapolis (100- ) (WAW) (Ends. 3) (RM) 

(1 100 ' Haute, Indiana, 4/7/72) 


(100- \ t V,VAW) (Ends. 2) (EM) 

(1 - 100-1731) r 

2 - Kansas City (106- ) (WAW) (Ends. 2) (EM) 

(1 - 100- ) ( I 

2 - Mttle^Eock (100 4l5b) (WaW) j Bnds. 2) (EM) ^ 

. 1 (Ends. 3) (EM) 



) fWAW 


3 - Los Angeles (100- 

(1-100- " 4 )f 

(1-100--;, )| 

(100- ) (WAW) (Ends. 2) (EM) 

) (MIDEM) 

-^femphis (100-580 41 fWAm (Ends. 2^ (EM) 

(i_- 100 - _ ) I r 






f;'-: 


2 - Milwaukee (100-1 ^674) fWAW) ( EncTi7^2) (EM) 

(1 - 100- T 1 

2 - Newark (100- ) fWAW) Tlncl s. 2) (EM) 

(1 - 100^. ) L 

2 - New Haven .'(:100- 

(1 - 100- ) r 


) (WAW) ( 


!nds. 2) (EM) 


blb4Vl (WAWT "(Ends. 3) (RM) 


2 - New Orleans' (100 ->>1U58) <WAW) VE nola. 2) (EM) 

(1 - 100- ) I T / 

3 - Philadelphia (100= 

(1 - 100 - ) 

(1 - 100 - ) 

2 - Pittsburgh (100- 
(1 - 100 - )[ 

2 - Portland (100- 
(1 - 100 - ) 

1 - Eichmond (100- 






nds. 2) (EM) 


XISZraiZCESds. 2) (EM) 
Enc^.. 


) (WAW) (Enel. 1) (EM) 

? 


- 2 - 







V',' 


■' < 








V} 




I, < * 


NY 10p-l60644 

' / ^ 

S.\ ^k' 

-.sf> Af 

COPIES 'CONTINUED 


2 - St. .Louis; (100- _ 

(1 t-lOOr'*. ' , ) [ 


<-i ' 




't* i*' ^ 


4 r San ..Antonio (100- 

(1 - loo-'^^L^ ) 

1-100-4. . ' ) 


^^rWAW^ rE nels. g);<(RM) ‘ 

[kticls,. 4) (rm) 


2b2Q^ <WAWr 


2 - San Diego '^(100-1447.7 ) (WAW) (Ends. 2) (RM)^ 


(1 - 100 - 


) (CALREP) 


■// 


-V 


(i-ioo-‘'"r ] 
(1 - loo- J 

» 3 - Washington Fielc 
(1 - 100 - ] 

. h, - TOO- 

1 

1 

^7) (Ends. 

1 ( 100-47162 fWA^ 

1 

L 


1 

H 






A 




1 


1 - weiTTo^rTlOD^ 

1 - New York blOO- 
1 - New l 8 rk (100- 
1 - New York (100- 
1 - New York (100- 
1 - New York (100-172937) 
1 - New York (100-174562) 
1 - New York (IOO-I 7 I 898 ) 
1 - New York (100- ) 

1 - New York (100- ) 

1 - NeW York (100- 
1 - New York (100-170991, 
1 - New York (.100-169441) 
1 - New York ^(<ipp-l60644) 
1 - Supervis6i^;|(42) 


i 



m 

(42 

42) 

Zito 


> 




^5 
+5 
(45) 

) (^.5) 
45 ) 










|NAmC) 


m 


j 


Appropriate copies of the IHM based oh its 
contents are designated for^^ listed offices. 






Source is 


The enclosed LHM is classified ^Coilf ideiiLial” to 


b6 

b7C 

b7D 


•‘i 


b7D 


protect the,;,dFdentity of the confidential informant of continuing 
value utilized in the LHM, The unauthorized disclosure of the 
identity of the Infomant could impair his future effectiveness. 
This could be pTrejudicial to the national defense interests of 
the United States, 


- 3 - 



) 












NY 100-160644 


Copies of the LHM are disseminated in New York City 
to Secret Service, 108th Military Intelligence Group and 
the Office of Special Investigations of the United States 
Air Force, 


LEADS 


DENVER 




AT DENVER, COLORADO . Will identify a nd furnish 
New York with annr oprlate GharaGterizations of 
and 


■bo 

b7C 


HOUSTON 


AT HOUSTON, TEXAS . Will through appropriate sources 
determine location of Naiional Steering Committee of the WAW, 
4/7-11/72, and will attempt to afford coverage of this meeting. 


INDIANAPOLIS 

AT TERRE HAUTE, INDIANA . Will afford coverage of 
demonstraiion^,at Indiana State University in which the WAW 
will participate on- 4/7/72 , 

SAN ANTONIO 


AT AUSTIN, TEXAS . Will identi fy and furnish N ew York 


wi th ah aDDroDriate char acterization of 
as 


also, known 


SEATTLE 


AT SEATTLE, WASHINGTON.. Will identify and furnish 


New Y<^k with an appropriate characterization of 
... WASH33?GTON FIELD 

AT; WASHINGTON, D.C. Will identify and furnish 
New. York with an aDProDriate characteriza tion of 


546-A685. 


] telephone numoer d.\jeL- 


- 4 _ 






o 


o 


NY 100-160644 


LEABS CONTINUED 
NEW YORK 


AT NEW YO^, NEW TORK , Will continue coverage of 
the Nat ional clear inghouse of the WAW, 25 Pfest 26th Street, 
through] 








\ 


BS 100-43798 

JAB/meh 

\ 


I [ suggested that telephone corapanies 

in the areas of Hxarai and San Diego be contacted for 
inquiries they might have received , explaining that 
persons .desiring such units could logically contact a 
■telephone company and -thereafter be referred to Bell and 
Howell or a subsidiai’y, inasmuch as telephone company 
fr*equencies would be utilized* 


If Miami and San Diego offices deem advisable , 
they should make such inquiries with telephone companies 
v/ithin their respective areas , 


•b 6 
b7C 







« Qw 




3/24/72 


Transmit the following in 

AIRTEL 


(Type in plaintext or code} 


(Priority) 


FROM: 


DIRECTOR FBI 

ATTENTION: DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE DIVISION 

SAC, MIAMI (80-1353) 

MIDEM 


It Is responsibility of Miami to keep Secret 
Service and local authorities apprised of plans of dissi- 
dent groups and individuals for protest activity in 
connection with the Democratic National Convention in 
July, To a great extent, local authorities, who have the 
task of maintaining order at the convention site, and 
Secret Service, with its protective responsibilities, are 
dependent upon information developed by the Bureau in the 
successful discharge of their specific duties. It is, 
therefore, imperative that all pertinent information 
relating to the convention be developed and appropriately 
reported as rapidly as possible. 

2 - Bureau (RM) 

2 - Alexandria (100- ) (WPP) (RM) 

2 - Atlanta (100-5889 ) (YSA) (RM) 

2 - Baltimore (157-5554) (CORE) (RM) 

2 - Boston (100- ) (YIP) (RM) 

2 - Chicago (100- )(yip>(RM) 

2 - Detroit (100-36217) (WPP) (RM) 

2 - Jackson (157-9032) (NWRO) (RM) 

1 - Jacksonville (Info) (RM) 

2 - Milwaukee (100-15948) (YIP) (RM) 

12 - New York (RM) 

2 - 100-175441 (WAM) . - 

2 - 100-169939 (PCPJ) 

2 - 100- (GLF) Si 

2 - 100-79303 (CORE) 

2 - 100- (WAW) 

2 - 100- (Red Balloon Collective) 

1 - San Diego (Info) (CALREP) (RM) 

2 - Tampa (100- (FPPC) (RM) 

- WFO (157- ) (NWRO) (RM) Q ^ ^ 


fearchS)* 
todexed. 
JorlElizo 
nM 







© © 


MM 80-1353 


DISSEMINATION 

Certain recipient offices have submitted information 
in the recent past with regard to plans for activity at the 
convention. This information has been appropriately dissemi- 
nated as received. Additionally, it has been, and will be, 
up until convention time, summarized in a bi-weekly LHM, the j 
first of which was submitted 3/23/72. These LHM*s must be 
prepared in cldar, concise, readable, and professional form. 

In many cases, activities for the Democratic National 
« Convention are at this time only in the planning stages. It 
is important, however, that we keep abreast of such plans, and 
that all information developed be disseminated promptly. Re- 
cipient offices are, therefore, requested to re-alert inves- 
tigative personnel to the necessity for immediate dissemination 
of all pertinent information relating to convention plans. 
Information developed should be submitted to the Bureau and 
Miami in a form suitable for dissemination with appropriate 
characterizations of organizations involved. Merely desig- 
nating an informant report to the Miami MIDEM file is not 
sufficient, since the Miami Office is frequently not in a 
position to characterize the organization or Individuals in- 
volved. LHMs should be submitted under the dual caption of 
the organization and MIDEM. 

INFORMANTS 

If Information is developed Indicating a demonstration 
is planned by a subversive group in which the office has no 
coverage or insufficient coverage, every effort should be 
made to effect immediate coverage and to fully develop this 
information. 

Also, at this time, each recipient office should 
give consideratiop to its coverage of protest activities by 
local organizations at the convention site and should begin the 
selection of informants who are able and willing to travel to 
Miami with their local contingent. This should be borne in 
mind as new plans develop or as additional groups are organized 
for this purpose. It is expected each contingent of any size 
will be accompanied by one or more sources of the home office. 

It is also expected the office will be selective in this pro- 
cess and will send informants who’ have demonstrated their 
capability to develop and relate pertinent, factual informa- 
tion. Bureau authority should be obtained. 



- 2 - 


V 




MM 80-1353 


Following the selection of an informant for this 
purpose, Bureau and Miami should be advised specifically of 
the following; i 

1) Office file number. 

2) Informant’s symbol number. 

3) Informant’s code name. 

4) Name of group and position of informant in group 

5) Size of contingent expecting to travel to Miami. 

6) Other coverage of this contingent. 

7) Anticipated payments to informant for services 
and expense^. 


After an informant’s travel has been approved by 
the Bureau, the home office should assure he is provided 
Vilith sufficient funds for the round trip without the necessity 
for personal contact with Miami Agents for such funds. 
Informant should be instructed to contact the Miami Office by 
telephone as soon as possible after his arrival consistent 
with security. Of course, he should never contact the Miami 
Office in person and should maintain frequent telephone con- 
tact with this office during the convention, no less than 
once a day. He can locate the Miami Office telephone number 
on the inside cover of any local telephone directory and for 
security reasons, he should be specifically instructed to 
make no written notation of this nu mber . When telephoning 


the office, informant should ask fori 


Miami Office 


switchboard will be issued instructions to immediately 
connect these callers with agents specif icaliy designated 
to accept these calls on a 24-hour basis. An FD-306 con- 
cerning each call will be submitted to the appropriate office 
for completion of its file. 


NOTE FOR SECURITY AND EXTRBIIST AGENTS - If info received from 
any office re organization making plans for Midem not in form 
suitable for dissemination, suairtel promptly requesting this 
be done. 



4/4/72 


AIRTEE, 


SAC, HOtXSTOlT 


FROM: SAC,MIAMX (100rX6340) 


SUBJECTS VIET NAM VETERANS AGAINST THE, WAR 
IS *■ NEW LEET 


00 s NE5f iORK 

Oh 3/31/7^ Miami Baacli Polic e. Dopartmen-b. fMBP Dl furnished 
a copy of a menro prep^ed by MBPD Sgt« | regarding, 

a mcEting of "Operation Snowplow" held in Miami on 3/9/72* Snow-^ 
Plow is a, newly founded, service organisation formed to finish 
food and shelter for denpnstrators. at the. DcitKjcratic N ational 
Convention (33NC) in Julv> 1972. According the memo ! 

I viet Nam Veterans Against The 

War ^WAW) , stated the National Convention of WAW would be held 
pn. Dallas, Texas, from 4/11-15/72, and at. that time it vrauld be 
decided as to hov/ many -WAW members will ^rae to the DNC and what 
their role will be > 

In view of information in Denver liHM of 3/1.7/72 regarding 
WAW, above information, is believed to be in error. The. next 
steering cbmmi'^i®^ meeting which is op^‘ to all, members was set 
for Houston, Texas, On 4/7-11/72, 

Houston is rei^ested to; be alert for WAW plans for 
demonstrations at the DNC and to report any information developed 
by IiHM xinder dual caption of "WAW"' and "MIDEM" per instructions 
in Bureau airtei to Albany dated 2/22/72 captioned "CAIREP" and 
"MIDEJI". 


2 Houston 

2 — New Yoric (100—160641) JCBsmnm 

Miami (1 - io0-16340) (6) 

• 80-1353) (MIDEMV 


ssarcRCra 

Indexed. 

Seclallzc 

q)6<l — 





4/4/72 


A t R T E L 

TO: S^C, WASHINGTON EIEli) OFFICE (100-51888) 

FROM: SAC, MIAMI (10p-i6101> (P) 

PCPJ 

IS - NEW IiEFT 
<00: NEW YORK) 

Re WFO air.tel to Bureau dated 3/31/72 with enclosed 

mi. 


WFO should note that oh page four of the 1^. a 
statenent is made concerning the ^'Republican National convention 
at Miami, Florida j August 1972.** 

This should be either Republican National Convention, 
San Diego, Calif ornlai August 1972 or Democratic National 
Convention, Miami Beach^ Florida, jruly 1972. 

WFO is requested to clarify- the stateE^nt as it apr. 
pears in IBM and advise Miami. 


2 - Washington Field Office 
2 - Miami 

(1-v 100-16101) 

(1-J80-1363) (MIDEM) 
WED/f 
(4) 



(RM) 



indexed-; 

Serialized — h 
fl^cd ^ 



j!0-'rs^3' /'^f 





4/4/72 


CODE 


NITEL 


TO: DIRECTOR (Attention; DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE DIVISION) 

m YORK 

CHICAGO 4 

, WEO - 

FROM: MIAMI ClOO-NKf) 

GAY lilBERATldN FRONT, (GLF) ■ TR - STIRVERSIYE. NEY YORK ORIGIN. 


GLFl 


ON MARCH THIHTYFIRST, SEVENTYTV/0, SERGEANT 


MIAMI BEACH POLICE DEPARTMENT, ADVISED THAT 
AFTER ,A RECENT MEETING OF "OPERATION SNOWPLOW", A 
COALITION oF GROUPS INTERESTED IN BECOMING INVOLVED • 

IN THE OOMING DEIIOCRATIC CONVENTION, AN OFFICER OF THE 
MIAMI BEACH PD PRESENT AT THE MEETINa SPOKE TO 
\7HO STATED HE IS 


AND-OAN BE reached AT THE GEORGE ‘WASHINGTON 


HOTEL IN NE\T YORK, TELEPHONE^ 


CLAIMED THERE ARE AT LEAST WO THOUSAND 


REPRESENTATIVES OF THE gGLF WHO WILL BE COMING t)OWN FOR THE 


JPM/dfc 


CONVENTION, FOR THE PURPOSE OP DEMONSTRATING A ^ FEiy WILI 


3 — Minnij. 

(t?- SO-1353) (MIDEM) 

(1 - 100-. 16573) (Snowplow) 


/i 



K' ^ 


bo 

b7C 



A 





0 


0 


MM lOd-NEff 
PAfeE TWO 

BE BELECATES TO THE CONVENTION . THE ENTIRE CONVENTION 
APPEARANCE OF THE GLF IS BEING HEADED BY BOB JOimSpN,- QF 
THE Y/ASHINGTQN, D, C. GUP. 

said some of MEMBERS OF THE GLF ARE 

AS ONEi 


TROUBl^MAKERS HE NAMEDj 
IS A MEMBER OfI 


bF THE GLF AND 


BA ID 


IS NOT JUST AN .ACTIVIST, BUT SEEKS 
TO OVERTHROW THE SYSTEM ALONG WITH SOME OF HI& FOLIGWERS. 
SGT.I 


STATED 


IS PRESENTLY IN NE\7 


YORKi HE BELIEVES 


IS ALSO IN NE\? YOREi 


AND 


be 

b7C 


CHICAGO AND WFO, CHECK INDICES RE[ 

BOB J:OHNSON RESPEC?TIVELY, BOTH OF WHOM ARE CONNECTED WITH 
GLF. 

NEW YORK, CHECK itTOICES RE 


AND 


FURNISH CHARAC^ERIZATiON OF GLF, 

HEW YORK, CONSIDER INTERVIEW OF 


FOR FURTHER 















p 


DIEECTOR, mi ^/3l/72 

SAG, mo (1^0-55349) <P) 

Miom 



Rei^lalri:^ 2/17/72 and I^airtei 1/14/72* 

The f olioTJlng sources of WFO were contacted regarding 
plans for demonstrations and other Kcw Left activities for ' 
the upcteing Demderattc National Convention in liimi, Florida* 
These source^ could furnish ho information regarding such 
plans, but were- averted. :fot any" related devdopaents. . 

Contacted By 


SA 
SA- 
SA 
SA 
SA 
SA, 
. .SA 
SA 

' - -SA 

SA 
- SA 

sa 

SA 
SA 
SA 
" .SA 
' SA 
- SA 
- SA 


WEt) will continue to be alert for anv developments 
regarding MIDE2i,. . 

2 - Bureau 
Miami 
1 \W0 

KMl'ldco 

^51 



Source Date 


3/20/72 

3/21/72 

3/tyiz 

3/21/72 

3/21/72 

3/22/72 

3/22/72 

3/22/72 

3/23/72 

3/23/72 

3/23/72 

3/lh/it 

3/24/72 

3mil2 

3/24/72 - 

3/27/72 

3/28/72 

3/22/72 









•/I f’ 


DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION PLANNING SUMMARY, MARCH 31, 1972 , 

ChlAf Pnmpranro i nti~rwjy(>gtj | | 

J for Federal Communications Commission (FCC phone 350-5542) 
Wno announced that his people would be, assigned around the clock during the 
convention, conducting supportive activities upon request only, by police 
agencies. FCC services could include electronic surveillance, frequency 
jambing, intelligence, etc. " ' 


OLD BUSINESS 
1 . Arrest forms. 


2. Miami P.DX.Arrest powers. 


3. Legal matters, courts, 
ordinance package, etc 


4. Fingerprints 


NEW BUSINESS 
1. Intelligence 


2. Credentials 


3. Bomb scares 


REQUIRED ACTION OR ACTION TAKEN 

To be printed in sequence and distri- 
buted by .PSD. Committee to be formed 
to feview team arrest procedures, etc. 

Chief Pomer ance to request that 

I be authorized to initiate 
an interpretation by Attorney General's 
office refe rence Flo rida Mutual Aid 

Act. Major] jto further 

research extent of local aid contrac- 
tural services authority, 

I working wit h Jud ge Wisehea rt, 

Judge Lee, Major ! I 

etc. New York City ordinance booklet 
to be analyzed. 

, I will initiate a committee 

to review and report. 


Major to prepare excerpts 

from copyrighted Bust Book. Chief 
Pomerance reported on meetings with 
representatives of potential counter 
groups. Chief Pomerance requested 
intelligence info to disseminate at 
national intell igence, meeting by 
April 4th. To date all intelligence 
is favorable. 

All agencies requested to determine 
and submit number of credentials 
needed. Pertinent command personnel 
should be included . j ^ 

Meeting to be* called reference 
procedures and responsibilities. 
Members will be notified. 








m 


ju'4'. Traffic density 


5. Communications 


PSD Coordinator 


7. Press crdentials. 


Training 


9. Hand-outs 


Need fpr traff.i c check p onts through- 
out state. It. I I FIorida ^ 

Highway Patrol requested to research. 

All agencies requested to tape all 
transmissions during 'convention. 

Major I l advises that all 

County convention infqrmqtion is 
filtered through, and'accessible at 
his office, phpne 377-7805. PSD . > 

plans to have Civil Qefense office, 
open around the clock during conven- 
tion. 

For offrsession activities etc; 

To be discussed at Police-Press , 
meeting May 3rd. 

PSD holding daily officer training . 
classes during entire month of April. 
Ralph Page to lecture oh news medi^v 
Miami Beach training officers to 
correlate with Countyl ’ , 

. t 

May Day Planning pamplet. List of 
major convention Activities to be 
included with these minutes. 


411 concurred that committee meetingsi intelligence, etc. shquld be conducted 
Alternately bi-weekly with reports submitted to these Convention Plfanning 
sessions which henceforth will be scheduled on‘a bi-weekly pasis. The 
next Planning meeting will be FRIDAY, APRIL 14th, at the parden Center 

Thqse in attendance at this March 31st meeting viere: • 

MIAMI BEACH POLICE DEPARTMENT PUBLIC SAFETY DEPARTMENT ^ 


SERVICE 


DEPARTMENT 


’ARTMENT 



lATIOtjS COMMISSION 


PATROL 


IRECU 


LI LI TAT I ON 


COURTS 


STATES ATTORNEY 


FLORIDA HIGHWAY PATROL 


IRHY 











Tm..:C=DEMOCRATIC 
[RATIONAL CONVENTION 


Charactor: 


or 

ClassllIoaUon: 80-1353 - 
Submrnin, Office: MIAMI , FLA . 


D Being Investigated 




ffiSpircasV; bui .'her. said\ 
pl^flsSfeTtd'j include those.as.^ 
far- north as the .Diplomat in 
HolJj^M and as'far jyest as; 
til'e,DorariC6uhtw 

;thihg,”‘'said;Murphy;. <‘What 
(we're doing, is, v.we’re . permit- 
tmg'iijthem. te^ell .the' .^advey- 
fiseinent^. anid'. get: thei profr 

■ -r, 

i ,; '!(',> 'h 

i ;MuYghi^5' *said.i: 'tlif “,,par(y'' 
'4wilF.cpntroir.ther'n^^^^ 
VJ^e-wUircoKtrp^^^^^^ 
conifenfe He .said'^such 'co'n- 
trob^would^be^necessary. ,to,. 
ensufeij^^ .all' 

presiienUalVcandidat^^^ ' 

I ' CioseSrcircuit telecas^^ was 


. fried on ' a^‘ limited basis-tto ; a 
\ftw('Jotels;tfdm 
^ .c'onvenlira^ inVrChfcago,^ 

• Mufphxrlljd;' .party offidali^^^ 
ar’ermaking’ a, greater .effort; ’ 




*(ed.' nr^s' ^ i^riferf^ sr ..and . 
;caucuf es^ beforer. tlie® ‘actual; ' 
;cqnv.ent^^^^ SMsions/tegin’.' iiL ' 
ibKafternora^^^^^ ' 

V«W,e3y%d.'.have^ puf , pwn“ 
producer.,.^’ Ukelysoi^ebody 
'frdm^'thef.comm^^ 

(seafs' in(the',coi^^^^ ^ ,we:wouW^ 

lo'-Iparticipate'' OT’m^6w/*in‘' ly;iinpartiattsitJuaii^ ’said 
- ^u^craaliyf T *■' *■ -■ ’ : Ed .Cubbefley';. Murphy’s , aj|^ 

. .. (THEi .'.cpyEM^^ .will. 

: ■ (begin' 'atja^.^^ 

■ 'thV( ,jS^r’'ip’p'4 ' 'conjentira; , 
and('end} wfe ' 

siom ’ is ; •Snipjeted;, ’ Murpfiy 
said;.H|’ said( thOTe( w&ld? be 
,poyera|eToT;jCOtl^ 


_ ^ .;>'.‘‘It',w 

bio otherwise 





^ ornoNU.i'OMriNObts 


TO 


MAT EornoM 
c*A rrMn (<i cm) hum 


UNITED STATES (O^SRNMENT 

Memorandum 

DIRECTOR, FBI (105-70374) 


date: 3/24/72 


FROM 


SAC, ALEXANDRIA (157-1) (P) 


subject: national SOCIALIST WHITE 

PEOPLE’S PARTY (NSWPP) 

EM - NSWPP 
00: ALEXANDRIA 


Re San Diego letter dated 2/29/72, nd cc Miami, 


on 


andf 


advi gp 


1 


that no information has been developed at NSWPP Head- 
qtiarters, Arlington, Virginia, concerning any plans 
of the NSITPP. for the forthcoming, 1972 National Conventions 
of the Republican or Democratic Party being held 
respectively in San Diego. Caljfnmifl. and Mi ami . 

Florida. 1 


These sources could furnish no information 
tending to corroborate i nformation alleging statemenh.< 

Kben in Chicago with 

1 j • __ 


made W f 


during January, 1972, regarding plans to move 
the NSWPP to San Diego during the 1972 Republican 
Convention or subsequently move the party to Chicago. 

Regarding the possible moving of the head- 
quarters. of the NSWPP from Arlington, Virginia, to 
Chicago, Illinois, these sources could provide no 


b6 

b7C 

b7D 



2 - Bureau (By Courier) t 
2 - Chicago (157-3) (RM) 

f ~ Miami (Info) (RM) 

- San Diego (157-28) (RM) 
5 - Alexandria 

157-1) (NSWPP ^ 
157-20) 

157-196) 








AP.n 1 W2. 'hi 

an 


Buj U.S. Savings Bonds Btgularly on the Bay roll Savwgs if tail 





\ 




AX 157-1 

’ . , ■ , ■ ■ .b 7 D 

information, adding no such plan s have been kno\m to have 
been discussed at headquarters. I ] expressed 

the opinion the party would not likely move from Arlington 
as it is too closely identified. with the area, having 
been there since its inception and established there 
by GEORGE LINCOLN ROCKWELL, a revered former leader 
and founder of the party. 





i 





I 


NR006 WF CODED 

10;15PM NITEL A-5-1Z MWM 

to DIRECTOR (100-469601) (ATTENTION DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE)' 
MIAMI 
FROM Vi 


fASHINGTON FIELD (100-55349) (TWO PAGES) 


MIDEM 




REFERENCE MIAMI AIRTEL TO, BUREAU, MARCH 'T WENT YPIVE 
S.EVENTYTWp. ' , 

NO LISTING FOR | 

WAS -FOUND IN THE FOLLOWING PUBLICATIpN-S; 

C & P .(WASHINGTON AREA) TELEPHONE DIRECTORY 
HAINES CITY DIRECTORY FOR WASHINGTON, D.C. (WDG) 

DUN AND BRADSTREET REFERENCE BOOK 

INDIOES OF WFO CONTAINED NO INFORMATION CONCERNING 


■b6 

b7C 

■b7D 







PAGE TWO 


THE ABOVE INFORMATION CONCERNING 


confidential 


STATUS WITH WFO IS NOT TO BE MADE KNOWN TO THE MIAMI POLICE 

' A » 

DEPARTMENT. P. ’ 



•FD-36 (Rev. 3>22-64) 


o 


F B I 


Transmit the following in 


AIRTEL 


Date: 3 / 31/72 


(Type in plaintext or code) 


(Priority) 


TO: DIRECTOR, FBI (62-112678) ' 

FROM; SAC, ALEXANDRIA (100-506) (P) 

WHITE PANTHER PARTY (WPP) 
IS-WPP 

(00: DETROIT) 


CALREP 


MIDEM 

Re Detroit air tel to the Bureau <iated 3/23/72, (no 
copy to Miami and San Diego); arid 'Detroit letter to the 
Bureau, 3/15/72, 

For the information of Miami and San Diego, referenced 
airtel contained information from Detroit that the White 
Panther Party (WPP) is not a structured organization in that 
WPP activities' in several cities throughout the country are 
not contingent upon approval of the Detroit Chapter or other- 
wise, 

4 - Bureau (By Courier) 

2 - Chicago (RM) 

2 - Detroit (100-36217) (RM) 

&- Miami (RM) ' 

(1 ^00-16553) ’ 

80-1353) (DEMCON) 

" ■ “ir sSep) 

U 80 CALREP; |sEARCHE0___IlN0FXU .....TZ 

(1 - , ) SERIALlZEOxs:? 

2 - Alexandria APR ri id/Z 

(1 - 100-506) 

(1 - 100-883) (CALREP) 1=1 

R J 1 : 1mm // ~ ^ 


(14) 


SEARCHE0_ 

SERIALIZED^. 


INPFXU ... 

^ d iy/2 

loiAMI A 


Approved: 


Special Agent in Charge , 


M Per 

U. S. COVERNMKNT PRINTING OFPICCl I971-41S-13S 




t 





AX 100-506 


On 3/31/72, Alexandria source mentioned in referenced 
letter who has furnished reliable information in the past 
concerning the WPP and who has been characterized by the Detroit 
Office on the basi-s of information furnished as "a competent 
observer and an efficient interviewer who obtained very factual 
and significant information" advised as follows:, 


b6 

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b7D 


On 

ral^ 

i source that 
Lwho is alJp^^p 

■r<app.TrHv V>v r.no 




and who allegedly 


had some connection with the People's Coalition for Peace and 
Justice (PCPJ) in 1968, and who was said to have taken 
part in planning Youth International Party (YIP) demonstrations 
at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago* 


told source that 


related to him that he 


had been in contact in the recent past with individuals who 

were planning disruptive activi ties directed towards the , Republican 

National Convention in San Di ego^ Calif or ni a , in August, 1972 o 


Jstated that there would be no organized effort 
to disrupt the Democratic National Convention scheduled for 
Miami, Florida, in July, 1972, by this group as the Democrats 
are currently destroying themselves and will need no ass ista nce 
from anyone to disrupt their own convention » However, there 
will be a lot of trouble at the Republic National Convention 
in San Diego" and plans are currently being discussed but not 
iniplemented_ as how to best achieve this disruption » «0he of the 


primary reasons according tp 


as to why no active efforts 


have been made to implement, these plans is a lack of fu nds 
at the present time. This group consists, according to 


of people who were formerly ‘affiliated with the PCPJ and YIP, 
and who have some funds left over from prior campaigns of these 
organizations o 






- 2 - 










i 


% 







' AX 100-506 


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told 


that many former leaders of the P€PJ 


and YIP have been discredited in the eyes of "rank and file " 
activists of these organizations as they feel that former leaders 
such as JERRY RUBIN have "become self-made superstars" and are 
only interested in obtaining fame and publicity for themselves 
rather than in the past stated goals of YIP and other related 
groups o 


Leadership of PCPJ and YIP, according to 
is currently fragmented and the task of Vpicking(j,up the pieces" 
and putting together an effective organization has been assumed 


by[ 


and a forme r member o f the Beatles 


are said to 


singing group, JOHN LENNON, LENNON and 
beyworking together and devised the following plan to obtain 
funds to finance activities against the Republican Convention: 

A series of "rock concerts" featuring big-name 
established stars in the musical field as headliners and 
backed up with lesser known individuals and groups will be 
put on throughout the coxmtryo LENNON is said to have the 
know-how and the connections to achieve the above o These 
performances will provi de the main source of funds needed 


by LENNON and 
in San Diego, 


to carry out the disruptive tactics 


The first such concert, according to source, is to 
be held in the Chrysler Arena, Ann Arbo r, Michi gan, in the 
near future. This will be, according to | | "the opening 

gun of the campaign." . ' 


Alexandria source again advised that jreminde 

him that he desired no direct contact with the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation but would furnish information only to him. 
Additionally, for the information of the Bureau, Alexandria 
I [ (Bureau refer 

to Alexandria airtel to Director, 3/10/72,) 




- 3 - 




be 

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b7D 



i 



AX 100-506 


Additionally, the above informatinn if disseminated 

outside the Bureau could tend to comprimise | |as it is 

not known how many individuals have had access to ito 

LEADS 


CHICAGO 


on 


AT CHICAGO, ILLINOIS. Will obtain background information 
and advise Bureau and interested offices of any 


pertinent information. 


DETROIT 

AT DETROIT. MICHIGAN ." iT"^ Will discreetly ascertain 
if a rock concert is scheduled to be held at the Chrysler Arena, 
Ann Arbor, in the ;near future o 


on 


2o Will attempt to obtain background information 
and advise Burea and interested offices of pertinent 


information developed. 


3o Will through established sources ascertain if 
I and LENNON are involved in attempt to cause 
disruption of the Republican Convention at San Diego, 
California, in August; 197‘z, 

4o Will advise Alexandria if any of the above 
infoimiation in the body of instant communication is verified 
in order to assistant Alexandria in directing its sources 


ALEXANDRIA 

AT ALEXANDRIA. VIRGINIA o '1. 11 ^submit _LH^^ _ 

regarding Jthe above information. _ _ 

■ 2o Will mainfain contact with source and await results 
of investigation set foT.'th aboyco 


.r 


- 4 - 




(This line for LEFT MARGIN.)' 






0^ (Rev j^5- 18-71) 


Transmit in 



> .. 


0 


Q 


(Type in plaintext or code) 


Via. 


F B 


Airtel 


To: SAC, Miami (80-1353) 

I / From : 

MiDEM 


Date 


(Priority) 


Director, FBI 


ReMMairtel 3/23/72. 

Referenced communication, which is a summary of preparation:; 
being made by the Miami Office for demonstrations during the 
Democratic National Convention, contains information relating to 
needs for technical equipment. 

You should promptly resubmit your request for technical 
equipment with appropriate justification by separate communication 
captioned as above and addressed ’’Attention**: Laboratory or Files 

and Communication Division. 




In Vlviw Hvjer to 

™'' '' MM 157-489 


o . 

iiNi'i'Ki) s'l' vn:s 




mU'Ain'iM K.X'I' OK .lUS'l'ICK 


Miami, Florida 
April 5, 1972 


DECLASSIFICATION AUTHORITY DERIVED FROM: 
FBI AUTOMATIC DECLASSIFICATION GUIDE 

DATE 02 - 07 -Z 01 Z 


Re: SOUTHERN CHRISTIAN LEADERSHIP CONFERZ><CS 

(SCLC) 

INTERNAL SECURITY - COMMUNIST 


DEMONSTRATIONS DURING THE DEMOCRATIC 
NATIONAL CONVENTION, MIAMI, FLORIDA 
JULY, 1972 


The SCLC is a civil rights 
organization, primairily oi black 
membership, headquartered in Atlanta, 
Georgia, formerly led by the late 
Reverend MARTIN LUTHER KING. 


On March 8. 1972. and April 4, 1972, MM T-1 


advised that] |a local Miami, Florida 

representative of the SCLC, recently stated that the SCLC 
had no formal organization in the Miami-Dade County, 


■b6 

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Florida area. | jmentioned, however, that there were 

two field representatives of the SCLC from Atlanta, Georgia 
who we re operating in the Miami area from time to time. 


did not identify these representatives. 


MM T-1 stated that 


volunteered that the 


SCLC had no intention of disrupting the forthcoming 
July, 1972 Democratic National Convention at Miami Beach, 
Florida and to the contrary the SCLC hoped to act as a 
stabilizing influence upon some of the extreme groups 
which might possibly participate in dem onstrations at the 


said the SCLC 


Democratic National Convention, 

intended to offer its services in a ’’Ixaison capacity" 
between the demonstrating groups and local police authorit ies. 


She said that in furtherance of this intent, she, f 

and another representative of the SCLC, had already contacted 
the Miami Beach Police Department and had offered their 
assistance in this regard. 


esarcDsd. 



V* 





o 


o 


X 


*5 ■ 


CONFI^EjmAL 



Re: SOUTHERN CHRISTIAN LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE; 

DEMONSTRATIONS DURING THE DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL 
CONVENTION, MIAMI, FLORDA, JULY, 1972 


On April 4, 1972, above source advised that 
the SCLC was malting tentative plans to hold "A Poor 
Peoples Convention" in Miami Beach, Florida at the same 
time as the Democratic Natipnal Convention. The exact 
details concerning this Poor Peoples' Convention have not 
been completely worked out and details were unknown to 
the source as of the date of contact. 

This document contains neither recommendations nor 
conclusions of the FBI. It is the property of the FBI and 
is loaned to your agency: it and its contents are not to 

be distributed outside your agency. 


- 2 * - 


CONFIDENTIAL 







^0-323 (Rev. ll-29-t>I) 




UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 
FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 


In Reply, Please Rt^er to 
File No. MM 157-489 


Miami, Florida 
April 5, 1972 


Title 


SOUTHERN CHRISTIAN LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE 
(SCLC) 

DEMONSTRATIONS DURING THE DEMOCRATIC 
NATIONAL CONVENTION, MIAMI, FLORIDA 
JULY, 1972 


Character INTERNAL SECURITY - COMMUNIST 

Reference Letterhead memorandum dated and captioned 
as above at Miami, Florida. 


All sources (except any listed below) whose identities 
are concealed in referenced communication have furnished reliable 
information in the past. 


This document contains neither recommendations nor conclusions oi the FBI. It is the property 
of the, FBI and is loaned to your agency; it and its contents are not to bo distributed outside 
your agency. 




4 ah'Sr. 






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I it iig surrgOgtod tiiat a I cage be opened on Tier ^ 

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yrill be. coniaPted ip tlie fpiure r©£rai?dihji possifel© ^CtC " 
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FD-342 (Rev. 1-26-65) 

United State^^^partment of Justice 
* Federal Bureau of Investigation 


FJLori.da 
I^rLX 1 b X972 



1 — tfS .Secret; Service 
Miami# Florida 




Dear.Sir: 

For your information, I am enclosing cpmmunications 
which may be of. interest-^to you. 

Very truly yours/ 

KEmBTB W. 

Special Agent in Charge 

Enc. 1 

REGISTERED MAID 


- 80-1353 
1 - 66-2586 
CTCB • si 
(3) 


(Upon removal of classified enclosures. If any, this transmittal'' form becomes 
UNCL-ASSIFIED.) ■ 


fov3S3 


A ,JQ 



i 



0 


O 


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 


FEDERAL liUUEAU OF INVESTIGATION 


In Reply, Please Refer to 
File No, 


80-1353 


Miami, Florida 
April 7, 1972 


RB: 


On March 29, 1972, Sergeant 
Beach Police Department, Miami Beach, 
follows : 


I Miami 

Florida, advised as 


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b7D 


apartment building located opposite tne entrance to thd 
Miami Beach Convention Hall where the 1972 Democratic National 
Convention will be held from July 10 - 14, 1972. 


On March 28, 1972, 
|that he had been approa 
spokesman identified herself as 


£ 


advised Sergeant 

ed bv a group of people v/hose 


New York City^ and a 

New York Delegate to the Democratic National Conven tion. 
Placed $ 1.000 down on the rental of an apartment in 


She 


Ifirom Juno 15 to July 15, 1972 and insisted on being 


given an apartment overlooking the entrance to Convention 
Hall, She was given Apartment Iftirniahed this 

information since he had no way of verifying if| 

is a legitimate delegate to the Democratic National Convention, 


McDonnell-Ftain Security Service, 


Miami Bea ch, Florida, advised on March 29, 1972 that] 

I ~h ould not be a delegate from New York since the 

New York delegates to the convention have not yet been chosen. 

Detective l I on March 30, 1972, Security 

and Investigation Section, New York City ,pm •{ r»a Pepa-rfcmp irhy 
advised that his office has no record of 


T 







I 









o 


Base d upon the information furnishedi 

l is not identifiable in the files of the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, 


This document contains neither recommendations 
nor conclusions of the FBI, It is the property of the FBI 
and is loaned to your agency; it and its contents are not 
to be distributed outside your agency. 



0 


0 


,Ainm 


4/7/?2 


3».» 


DIRECTOR»^ FBX (100-^469601 J 

ATXs ' DOMESTIC HOTELDIGENCS DIWISIOH 


FBCXMs saqj J-UM13; <80-1^53) 


MIDSM / 

. (ailFORMATIplI COS^SMIKG 
^SAS. LatJOiiEaf) 



EQ Bure^au aiartel>i:o i^iansi 3/3l/72» 

i^clocQ^ a»a oi^ht copies, for Bufoau an<^ nno rr i n^r 


for Ksaif Ybrlc of f c»fh iajSomatioii f e 


C 


Ssrvios, 


AlSAC 

to Sh\ 


rpi:^ dlsaoiainati^ 1^ bpl^ aado $;p Secret 


Infonaation coataine^ in IHl was fernirlhcd to 

tlS Se erot Sbrv4,cOi Ifork# on 3^30/72 ^ 
os Soerct; Sorvlco^ l^lami, on 3/31/72 





BE: DEMONSTRATIONS AT CTE DEMOCRATIC 

NATIONAL CONVENTION, MIAMI BEACH, 
FEOBIDA 


Dear Sir: 

For your information, I am enclosing communications 
which may be of interest to you. 

Very truly yours, 

Kenneth W* ' it t nicer 

Special Agent in Charge 


Enc. ^ — 1 

BEGISTEEED MAID 



{Upon removal of classified enclosures, if any, this transmittal form' becomes 
UNCLASSIFIED.) 


In Reply, Please Refer to 

File No., 80-1353 


DECLASSIFICATION AUTHORITY DERIVED FROM: 

F^I AUTOMATIC DECLASSIFICATION GUIDE 

0Z-07-Z-01Z 

UNITED STATES DEPAUTMENT OF JUSTICE 
KEDEUAL liunEAU OK INVESTIGATION 

Miami, Florida 
April 6, 1972 


RE: DEMONSTRATIONS AT THE DEMOCRATIC 

NATIONAL CONVENTION, MIAMI BEACH, 
. FLORIDA 


ORGANIZATIONS PLANNING PROTEST DEMONSTRATIONS 

A. ELEmON year STRATEGY INFORMATION 

cen;ter (eys'ic) 

Miami memorandum dated March 23^~~lD72, disclosed 
the EYSIC was established to coordinate New Left 
Movement activities throughout the United States 
to culminate with demonstrations at the Republican 
National Convention, San Diego,* California. The 
EYSIC had connections with the Florida Peoples 
Platform Coalition. (See item I,B, below) 

The EYSIC, formed to direct New Left protest activities 
during the 1972 election year, ceased to exist around the first of 
March, 1972. EYSIC*s audio-visual arm. Youth Election Strategy,, 
however, is reportedly still functioning and producing films 
related to automatic weapons equipment used by the United States 
Army in, Southeast Asia. Plans are to show the films to 
demonstrators gathered at the Democratic and Republican Conventions 
this summer. / , 

/ MM T-1 / • 

/ March 10, !^72 

B. FLOr/dA peoples platform coalition (FPP/C) ' 

The.FPPC. also known as Florida Peoples ( 

Coaliticm, is a statewide coalition established 
as a pressure group to demonstrate at the 
Democratic National Convention in July, 1972. ’ 



CONFIDENTIAL . 

Gr oun A 

Excluded from automdtifd^ 
downgi^dihg and tncexcd. 

declassification Serialize 

V / \ Fllwl — 



^/3S3"-c^O‘7 



o 


Q 


CWi^ 


ENTIAL 


RE: DEMCXJRAT^IC NATIONAL CONVENTION 


An anti-war rally was held on the mall at the 
University of South Florida (USF) , Tampa, Florida, on March 8, 

1972, by a group Of individuals affiliated with the FPPC, 
including RENNARD C. DAVIS and SUSAN GREGORY from New York. 

Although it was an FPPC function, it was officially sponsored > 
at USF by the Youth International Party (YIP), a campus-approved 
organization, 

YIP, also known as Yijppies, is a loosely knit, 
anti-Establishment , revolutionary youth organi- 
zation formed in New York City in January, 1968. 

At the rally, which was attended by about 200 persons, 

ED DEATON of the FPPC acted as master of ceremonies. The main 
speaker was RENNIE DAVIS, who was convicted of Antiriot Law 
violations during the 1968 Democratic National Convention, 

DEATON’S discussion concerned the ’’automated air war" being 
practiced by the American military against the population of 
North Vietnam, He exhorted those present to work to defeat . 
President NIXON and to elect a "peace candidate" who would 
immediately withdraw all United States forces from Indochina and 
cease the backing of the Saigon Government, 

The second speaker, SUSAN GREGORY, introduced as a 
member of the "Antiwar Union", New York City, presented a three- 
point peace plan backed by the FPPC, This planwas= to be presented 
to each candidate in the Florida Presidential Primary. All persons 
present were asked to sign the FPPC "citizen’s pledge", asking 
the candidates, to endorse the three-point peace plan and stating 
support would be withdrawn from those who refused to endorse the 
plan. The three point plan is as follows: 

1, Within 24 hours after inauguration, the 
President will immediately stop the bombing 
and all other military operations in Indochina, 

2, The President will immediately set a date for 
the complete withdrawal within three months 
of United States personnel and equipment from 
Indochina, 

3 , The United States Government will end all 
support for the THIEU regime in Saigon, 

2 . 

C(^Fj[DS^TIAL 



O 


and the military regimes of Laos and 
Cambodia. 

MM T-2 

March 8 , 1972 

The FPPC held a statewide steering committee meeting 
March 25 and 26, 1972, at the Wesley Foundation, University of 
Miami, Coral Gables, Florida. 

During the first session, the discussion concerned 
FPPC organizational structure, the problem of finances, the 
establishment of a communications network and the actions 
that should be taken during and at the site of the Democratic 
National Convention. The meeting was dominated by the Miami 
contingent, who vetoed strong actions and civil disobedience, 
which were sugges.ted, and insisted all demonstrations at the 
site of the Democratic National Convention be peaceful and 
non-violent. 

With respect to the Democratic National Convention, a 
two-day action was tentatively decided upon. On July 12, 1972, 
from 10:00 A.M. to noon, a rally would be staged at Bayfront 
Park in downtown Miami. The gathered group would then disperse 
throughout the city to hold "teach-ins” and to distribute 
literature door-to-doof in the community. On July 13, 1972, 
the group at 12:00 noon would again congregate in Bayfront Park. 

At 3:00 P.M., following a short rally, they would march to the 
site of the Democratic National Convention on Miami Beach, Florida. 
At 6:00 P;M. another rally that would' include speeches, music, 
and the distribution of food would take place. lYhen the Democratic 
candidate is announced, they will seek to have him come from the 
convention hall, at which time they will confront him with their 
demands. They hoped at least 15,OO0 would participate and stated 
$20,000.00 would be needed for the planned activities. 

On the second day of the steering committee meeting, ■ 
informal discussions on organizational structure took place. 

Nothing was clearly resolved. In the afternoon, the group 
visited various areas in Miami and Miami Beach, Florida, which 
could be used as possible camp sites during the forthcoming 
Dempcratic National Convention. Watson Island was the one 



RE: DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION 


3. 

CONF^DElftlAL 


o 


o 


CONFlb^mEAL 



RE: DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION 


preferred. The groiip also visited the Miami Beach Convention 
Hall, the site of the forthcoming Democratic National Convention, 

MM T-3 

March 26, 1972 


Elements of the FPPC from North Florida are expected , 
in Miami during the first week of April, 1972, to rent a house 
which they will occupy until the convention and from which 
they will promote demonstrations to take plac e at the convent ion. 
Reportedly they are to recei ve $5.000.00 from i 

I to finance their venture. 


an 


MM T-3 

April 2, 1972 


h6 

hlC 


C. MIAMI LIBERATION FRONT (MLF) 


The MU' is a local coalition of students, 
women and young workers who share in a common 
opposition to racism, sexism, and imperialism. 

This coalition was organized around the consensus 
that there must be coordinated non-violent 
opposition and confrontation at the Democratic 
National Convention, to be held on Miami Beach 
during July, 1972., 

“The Weather Report** 
Volume 1, Number 2 
Published by MU 
March 3, 1972 

The MLF is the local contact and was the host organi- 
zation for the statewide steering committee of the Florida 
Peoples Coalition, held at the University of Miami, Coral Gables, 
Florida, March 25-26, 1972. (See Florida. Peoples Platform 
Coalition). 

MM T-3 

March 26, 1972 


4. 


CONFUJOTIAL 



1 




o 


■ o CO^^DENTIAL 

RE; DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION 

D. RED BALLOON COLLECTIVE 

The March .5, 1972, issue of the "New York Times" 
contained an article relating to a meeting of a new group called 
the Red Balloon Collective at Stony Brook, Long Island, New York, 
on March 3-4, 1972, The article referred to the possibility that 
members of this group may come to Miami for the Democratic 
National Convention. 

Chief ROCKY POMERANCE 
Miami Beach Police 
Department 

Miami Beach, Florida 

The Red Balloon Collective is a New Left group founded 
in New York in early 1972 for the purpose of bringing elements 
of the shattered New Left under strong centralized leadership. 

Its initial conference was held on March 3 to 5, 1972, at the 
State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York, for the 
avowed purpose of forming a "mass-based radical left organization". 

The affair was reported to be poorly organized, and the 
Red Balloon Collective did not realize its primary objective, the 
formation of a new radical left group. The discussions of the 
conference generally dealt with methods that persons and groups 
could employ to defeat President NIXON in his bid for reelectioh 
this year. 


During the conference, a representative of a coalition 
from Tampa, Florida, concerned with the Democratic National 
Convention, furnished the address of this coalition as P. 0. Box 
17521, Tampa, Florida, zip code 33612 (address of FPPC) . However, 
it was admitted during the conference that Miami is socially and 
geographically ill-suited for a mass action and that demonstrations 
there would be, at best, a "side show". No plans were made for any 
such demonstrations by this group. 


MM T-4 

March 16, 1972 

E. YOUNG WORKERS LIBERATION LEAGUE (YWLL) 


The TlYLL is a front organization of the 
Communist Party, United States of America, 


5. 

. Cofeg^TIAL 



o 


o 


CONF 




TIAL 


RE: DEMOCRATIC to±ONAL CONVENTION 


It was formed as a Marxist-Leninist youth 
group in February, 1970. 

During the weekend of March 17 through 19, 1972, 

~\ a. member of the YIVLL Central Committee, stated 
that the YWLL plans to join with other "movement" groups in' 
demonstrating during the Democratic National Convention. 

BLACK further advised that the YWLL plans have not yet been 
finalized and specific plans and number of participants are 
unknown at this time. 

MM T-5 

March 20, 1972 


'F. YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY (YIP) 

Miami memorandum dated March 23,~l!B727~disclosed that 
the Zeigtgeist International Party (Zippies), the political wing 
of the YIP, had circulated a pamphlet stating they will nominate 
a "rock" (referring to mineral matter) for President, with each 
state to hold a convention to decide their favorite "rock" 
candidate to attend the Zippie convention in Miami, timed to 
coincide with the Democratic National Convention in July, 1972. 

On February 22, 1972, source made available a 
leaflet distributed at a YIP-Zippie demonstration at Chicago, 
Illinois, on that date. The demonstration was held in front of 
the ABC~TV building, 190 North State Street, to protest the 
refusal of ABC-TV to allow their "rock" candidate equal time. 

The calendar of events in this leaflet stated that on July 9-15, 
1972, a "Zippie freek circus" would be held in Miami and referred 
to details on another page of the leaflet (See next page). 

MM T-6 

February 22, 1972 


) 


,{ 

\i 




CONF 


'ito 


TIAL 





»» 


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o 

:. . GOOD TIMES 


-•Vv ;'^“ 


o 




^ We call ourselvcs.ZlPPIES because what our scene has lacked 

for the past four years is ZIP. ZIPPIES have ZIP, We're past 

hippies, and beyond yippics. After Y comes Z. We're Zippies. Our 
■ prograrn is simple— Peace Wow, Freedom Now, VVe believe in 
^ . good times for all. 'A'e f »ol if v/c arc going to achieve Utopia, 
somebodv'has to get »he, ball rolling. . 

MSMMI ' 

orimaries,* interest to ^owiU chanKe the drift of the 

^ regular Dems wake up & see we’re not goint’’ to 

let ‘cm con pn,yboi.y. The conventions arc the solar plexus of the 
system. The outlines of San Diego have already become clear. But, 
.. , - ' ■ ' T • ■ . we are much 

.. . .’C. . ‘ V.'" *\ into Miami 

.because tve're from 



ir.'-'’. 


.VV; 


a« ’ f 

v^: 

’ *,V ' - ■ 


' ; * the eastern- end 

, of the country & 

. be* cause it’ll bo 

' •• different from either 
■ ' ■ . ^'ans Diego or ChlTown ‘68. 

. ' , . I’he. governor there 

‘ ' is a Lindsayite 
.» Democrat. 'I’he regular ' '.'*** 

• , ‘ Denis are amtious ^ . • 

. [ '' ' - not to screw up liieir ' , , " , , ' 

■ ;* ' ' nev/ youthful image. , , , * • , 

’ They will welcome youth 
; % & try to channel us into rock ' 

concerts & meaningless 

betomake us into windov/ dres '' ' “' • 

sing for the same old . . ' 

shit. Our gopl Win ' . ’ '-1.. ’ ,’U ' V.'^' ’• 

be to expose it. - ; ’• 

In ’/2 VIP and iijLr repcescncs'iy speaks for all m, ’ • 

just -yoiichs. In -72.we'rc £or t,.e humanX\tJ"°‘' 

^ Every stare will bring -a rock to Miani, & 2 rocKs will be chos’en as 
^thc 'ilV-ZXP '■slate" ior office, wa're going to show that the youth Vote 
>^can.. t be taKen.for granicei we re goniia rock Che boat in *72.' We want 
- itito cae Make *72 one big rock festival 


,Cast youc^'vote with, 'the rock. 


>}-■ 

■2f 









•'v; 


i , - 

'' \ i'T • 



o 


o 


GOtnriDENTIAL 

RE: DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION 


II. organizations Planning attendance of delegates or members 

A. MIAMI SNOWPLOW COMPANY 



The Miami Snowplow OorapmiyT— sometimes referred to as 
"Operation Snowplow" or simply "Snowplow", is a coalition of 
22 organizations founded in Miami, Florida, in January, 1972. 

Its purpose is to provide such services as housing, food, legal 
aid, medical aid, and a commur^cations network for the expected 
influx of young protesters," observers, and non-delegates to 
Miami Beach for the Democratic National Convention. "Snowplow’s 
stated purpose is to work toward a peaceful convention and to 
protect the rights of protesters. It is a nonpolitical service 
group that intends to provide services for anyone in need. 

MM T-3 

March 2, 1972 

"Snowplow" meets weekly at the Center for Dialogue, 

St. John’s Lutheran Church, 2175 N.W. 26th Street, Miami. 

Its meetings are normally chaired by its coordinator, LYNN 
SLAVITT, and are attended, on invitation, by various law 
enforcement representatives in the area. The meetings are 
generally concerned with overall plans for servicing dissidents 
expected to arrive in Miami at convention time. 

Recent meetings of "Snowplow" have been principally 
concerned with efforts to obtain funds for the organization. 

At the March 31, 1972, meeting, it was announced that the 
United Fund of Dade County had agreed to underwrite the budget 
of "Snowplow" and that Dade County Manager RAY GOODE had 
committed Dade County to support "Snowplow" in the areas of 
food and medicine. 

MM T-7 

April 5, 1972 

B. SOUTHERN CHRISTIAN LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE (SCLC) 

V ^ ■' ' ' _ JZ 

The SCLC is a civil rights organization with 

headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia, formerly 

led by the late Reverend MARTIN LUTHER KING. 

8 . 


WrFTDKNTTrtL 



o 


o 


- GOIfFIDBNTI Atr 

RE: DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION 


The SCLC desires to act as liaison between various 
demonstrating groups at the Democratic National Convention 
and local police authorities. The Miami Beach Police Depart- 
ment has been approached by SCLC representatives in this regard. 
SCLC has no intention of disrupting the convention or conducting 
demonstrations at the convention, but at this point hopes to 
act as a stabilizing influence through this liaison capacity. 

SCLC is planning to hold a "poor peoples convention" 
in Miami Beach at the same time of the Democratic^ National 
Convention. Details of this activity have not been finalized 
at this time. 

MM T-8 

April 4, 1972 

C. VIETNAM VETERANS AGAINST THE WAR (WAW) 



WAW is a national veterans organ iz^Ttron— with 

a national clearinghouse located at 25 West 
26th Street, New York City. Its first 
published objective is "to demand an immediate 
cessation of fighting and a withdrawal of all 
American troops from Indochina". 

A National Steering Committee meeting of the WAW 
will be held at Houston, Texas, April 7-11, 1972, and among the 
purposes of this meeting is to determine the extent of the 
participation of the WAW at demonstrations at the Democratic 
National Convention at Miami, Florida, during the Summer of 
1972. 

MM T-9 . 

March 24, 1972 


On March 9, 1972 ,| 

for the WAW, stated that at a national meeting of WAW, to 
be held in Texas, April 11, 1972, it would be decided as to 
how many WAW members would come to the Democratic National 
Convention in Miami in July, 1972, and what their role would be. 

MM T-10 

March 31, 1972 


9. 

COtTFIDiaiTIMr 


OOI^IDMTIAL 


RE: DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION 


During the week of March 20 , 1972 | 

1 of WAW, in Miami, dis- 

cussing preparations for the forthcoming national convention, 
indicated that it was hoped that some 5,000 veterans would be 
here for that occasion. He mentioned plans, to have the young 
people coming for the convention obtain City of Miami Identi- 
fication Cards, These cards may be obtained voluntarily at 
the Miami Police Department Identification Section, Once they 
are issued these cards with their photographs, the young people 
would not likely be subject to arrest as transients in case 
they are questioned by local police officials during convention 
activities . 


MM T-11 

March 23 , 1972 

At a meeting of "Snowplow" held in Miami on March 31, 
1972, it was reported that WAY/ has been given the mission of 
marshalling the demonstrations. WAW has asked permission of 
the Miami Beach City Council to use Flamingo Park and Lummus 
Park, near tho convention hall, for camp areas during the 
convention. No reply has been received from the Miami Beach 
City Council, 


MM T-7 

April 5, 1972 

D. WAR TAX RESISTANCE (WTR) AND WAR 
RESISTERS LEAGUE (WRL) 


Miami memorandum dated March 23, 1972, disclosed 
that at a national Conference of the WTR and WRL 
held January 8, 1972, mention was made that the 
possibility exists some type of revolutionary or 
resurrection city would be set up in Miami during 
the Democratic National Convention, 

Individuals associated with WTR and WRL may be planning 
to attend the Democratic National Convention on their own; how- 
ever, no national plans have been formulated by either group at 
this time to attend the convention, 

MM T-12 

March 27, 1972 

10 . 


cowifiuLimArr" 




Q O 

b6 

- U ) HriDijAJTlAL 


RE: DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION 


III. THREATS OF POSSIBLE VIOLENCE OR DISRUPTIVE ACTIVITIES 

A. CONGRESS OF RACIAL EQUALITY (CORE) 

CORE is a civil rights organizatioiT'^th 
headquarters in New York, New York. 


On March 8, 1972, who is affiliated with 

CORE in Baltimore, Maryland, Stat6d that orders had been 
received from national CORE headquarters to the effect that 
members of CORE should make plans to employ disruptive tactics 
during the Democratic and Republican National Conventions this 
year. He indicated CORE members throughout the country will 
seek admission to the Conventions by various means but the 
exact form of the disruptive tactics to be employed was not 
related. 


MM T-13 
March , 1972 


B . GAY ACTIVIST ALLIANCE (GAA) 


Information was received from an*^undercover agent’* 
that a group of homosexuals called Gay Activist Alliance had 
recently >met at Miami, at which meeting the possibility of 
committing violence at the Democratic National Convent ion was 
discussed. Rptrnla-r ngg n-f thig o-T^nim held atf 


which is the 

resiaence of| | Identity of 

source’s ’’undercover agent” was withheld pending receipt of 
additional ’’intelligence” from him^ 


be 

b7C 

b7D 


February 17-18, 
1972 


The identity of the above ’’undercover agent” is 


11 . 

rir>TJT?TnTCWTTAT. 








RE: DEMOCRATIC I^ATIONAL CONVENTION 



is completely unreli 

everything he sava is false. He stated! 

constant .trouble] 

was unable to provide current 


virtually 
lhad been in 


was unable to provide current residence. 

On March 15, 1972, was located 

and interviewed by Special Agents oi the Jb'Bi. He said a meeting 
of the GAA was held at 5024 N.E, 2nd Avenue, Miami, about the 
first week of February, 1972, and about 40 to 65 men, all 
homosexuals, were present. On a table in the center of the 
room, he observed 10 or 12 handguns, 2 rifles, and 4 cans of 
mace. He also saw a copy of the GM constitution, the ninth 
amendment of which advocated violence. He overheard various ’ 
members present make references to the Democratic National 
Convention, and one of them stated about 2,500 GAA members from 
New York were expected to come to Miami for the convention, 
^ claimed he was at this meeting | 
and that he was unable to recall any specific remarks made 
during this meeting relating to violence. He assumed violence 
was planned due to the presence of weapons and the reference to 
violence in the ninth amendment to their constitution. He 
declined to furnish his own address as he did not want to be 
contacted there at any time in the future, > 


On March 15, 1972 

advised SpeciaJ 


ligents od 


as loilows 


Miami group is a chapter of the national GAA which is head- 
quartered in New York City, About February 4, 1972, the 
initial meeting of approximately eight individuals was held 
in his apartment at which the Miami chapter of GAA was formed. 








o 


CONFIDENTIAL 


RE: DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION 


Discussions at this meeting concerned only the purposes and 
aims of GAA, that is, that it is a group devoted only to one 
issue, Vgay rights". Those in attendance were primarily 
college students. At no time at this meeting or in subsequent 
meetings were any weapons in evidence or exhibited by any of 
those present. At no time was any form of violence suggested, 
discussed, .or in any way referred to even by implication. The. 
organi zation is strongly opposed to violence in any form. 

[produced a copy of the GAA constitution, which contains 
a Clause specifically repudiating violence as "unworthy of 
social protest". It was—nated this constitution has no ninth 
article or amendment, stated the GAA in Miami has 13 

members and at present neither the Miami chapter nor the 
national group has any plans to conduct demonstrations at the 
Democratic National Convention, 


IV. POSSIBILITY OF DISTURBANCE IN THE ETHNIC COMMUNITIES 
DURING THE CONVENTION 

During March and April, 1972, contacts with sources in 
a position to be aware of possible plans for violence or disrup- 
tion among members of ethnic and minority communities in the 
Greater Miami area have produced no indication of planned 
violence or disturbances to take place during the time of the 
Democratic National Convention. 

PROPERTY OF THE FBI - This document contains neither 
recommendations nor conclusions of the FBI. It is the property 
of the FBI and is loaned to your agency; it and its contents 
are not to be distributed outside your agency. 


13.* 


CONF^ENTIAL 



FD-323 (Bov. 1 l-29-6l> 



In Reply, Please Refer to 

File No. 80-1353 


© 0 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 

Miami , Florida 
April 6, 1972 , 


Title DEMONSTRATIONS AT THE DEMOCRATIC 
NATIONAL CONA^ENTION, MIAMI BEACH, 
FLORIDA 


Reference Memorandum dated and captioned as 
above, at Miami, Florida. 


/ 


All sources (except any listed below) whose identities 
are concealed in referenced conanunication have furnished reliable 
infoxmation in the past. 

MM T-8, contact v/ith whom has been insufficient 
to determine his reliability. 


ThtS' document contains neither recommendations nor, conclusions of the FBI. It Is the property 
of the FBI and,ls loahed to your agency; It and Its contents are not, to bo distributed outside 
your agency. 


14 



4/6/72 


AIRTEL 


TO: DIRECTOR, FBI 

Attention : Domestic Intelligence Division 

FROM: SAC, MIAMI <80-1353) (P) 

SDBJECT: MIDEM 


Re Miami air tel and liEM to Bureau, 3/23/72. 

Enclosed are 8 copies for the Bureau and 2 
copies for San Diego of an LHM captioned "DEMONSTRATIONS 
AT 3HE DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION, MIAMI BEACH, 
FLORIDA”. 


Enclosed LHM is cl assified G e ufidentlal since 


and other informants, 


it contains information from 

unauthorized disclosure of which could result in the 
identification of these informants to the detriment of 
U. S. defense interests. 


b7D 


Local dissemination is being made to U. S. 
Secret Service. 


were 


SAs who interviewed 


Sources are identified as follows: 


bb 

b7C 

b7D 


2-Bureau (Enc. 8) <RM) 

l^San Di^ (100- ) (CALREP) (Enc. 2) (Info) (RM) 

WM^mi (©80-1353) 

^1-80^53-Sub-A) 

JCB/al 





'‘/SS3 




HM 80-1353 


Source 
MM T-1 
H M T-2 
MM T-3 
MM T-4 
MM T-5 
MM T-6 
MM T-7 
MM T-8 
MM T-9 
Btt! T-10 
MM T-11 
MM T-12 


Identity 


A well-placed' source 
A well-placed source 


A well-placed soiurce 
A well-placed source 


MM T-13 










0 




OmONAL PORM NO.JO 
^ MAY t9SZ CDm0^n^' 

* » 6SA PPMft (41 cm) tOMl.t 


- 0 


UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

Memorandum 


TO : SAC, Albany 


■. Di 


Director, FBI 


subject: CALREP ; 
MIDEM 


date: 4/4/72 


*- 


ReBuairtel dated 11/2/71 captioned "Demonstrations 
During the Forthcoming Political Campaign," and Bureau airtel 
dated 1/19/72 captioned "Demonstrations During the Democratic 
National Convention." 

Referenced communications promulgated instructions 
to all offices concerning the reporting of disruptive activity 
during the Democratic and Republican National Conventions this- 
summer . 


It is anticipated that these two events will draw 
extremists and other violence-prone activists to Miami Beach, 
Florida, and San Diego; California. The Miami Office and the 
San Diego Office -will have a definite interest in the presence 
of such individuals in their territories . Secret Service in 
these cities will be charged with protecting the candidates, 
as well as other Government officials, and therefore, should 
be aware of their identities . The Miami Beach and San Diego 
Police Departments should also be aware of their presence and 
identities . 

Effective immediately and continuing until the 
Conventions are completed, each office, on developing 
information that an extremist or other violence-prone individual 
is traveling to either Miami Beach or- San Diego, will be expected 
to promptly alert the Miami or San Diego Office to the travel. 

As a means of alerting these offices, the following 
procedure is to be followed: 



SOIOOM 


Prepare a letterhead memorandum reporting the travel 
and containing a short , concise statement of the individual ' s 
organizational affiliation, if any, plus any history of violence. 


Enclosure 

3 - All Offices (Enclosure) 



SEARCHED. INDEXED„__^nr^ 

seriali 2 e;i<c>__.fileo....^^I. 

172 





■b 

b 


Buy U.S. Saviflgs^Boiids Regularly on the Bay roll Savings 




o 


o 


Letter to Albany 
Re: Cal rep; 

Midem 


A separate page is to be attached to this memorandum as an 
enclosure. The enclosure is to contain a photograph, a 
complete physical, description, any information relating to 
the carrying of weapons, past convictions for acts of violence, 

FBI number, and any other data that can be used for identifi- 
cation purposes,, such as a local arrest record or FBI identi- 
fication record 'Which may be appended^ to it. The enclosure 
should not contain any subversive information from Bureau sources’. 

On receipt, Miami or San Diego will furnish one 
■copy of the complete memorandum with enclosure to S,ecret 
Service. The enclosure -only will be removed from one copy 
of the letterhead memorandum and furnished 'to the police 
department having responsibility for policing the Convention. 

The letterhead memoranda are to be prepared in 
accordance with existing instructions . Where photographs are- 
not immediately available, reasonable efforts should be made 
to obtain them prior to submitting the memoranda. 

The Miami and San Diego Offices should be furnished 
at least four copies of these communications . Five copies 
should be sent to the Bureau. 

Those offices that are origin in the. investigations 
of key activists, key black extremists, and subjects included 
in the Extremist Bureau Fugitive List should furnish tJie above 
material on these individuals promptly to the Bureau and both 
Miami and San Diego. In these cases, since no travel plans 
are known, a reference should be made ih the memorandum to the 
effect that these individuals, because of their background; 
may travel to San Diego or Miami Beach. 

Each office is to remain alert for information 
indicating that individuals pf this nature will be traveling 
to the Convention sites and will be expected to continue to. 
alert their sources for information regarding the activity 
of extremists during the Conventions. 

During the build-up to these Conventions all offices 
should be alert to the possibility of criminal violations 
occurring within the Bureau's jurisdiction. Past experience 
indicates that activity prior to and during demonstrations 


2 ' - 





Letter to Albany 
Re: Calrep; 

Midem 


of this nature is conducive to violations of Federal anti- 
riot statutes. You should also be alert for possible 
, violations of Federal criminal statutes within this Bureau's 
jurisdiction, particularly the Presidential and Congressional 
Assassination Statutes, Crime Aboard Aircraft, and’ bombing 
and gun law statutes, together with our responsibilities:' under 
threats, to. the President. . You are reminded that information 
coming to your attention duri'ng the coverage of Convention 
activity., which .concerns possible criminal violations, may 
.subsequently be utilized as. evidence in a prosecutive proceeding 
and should, therefore,, be developed and preserved accordingly.’ 

In view of our responsibilities concerning the 
President and Congressional figures , San Diego and’ Miami 
II should set up separate, control' files, or folders on the 
I President and Vice President and the candidates for the 

Presidency, under protective .custody o£ the U. S. Secret Service. 
Upon receipt of instant communication,, each office hereafter 
should furnish a copy of .pertinent communications concerning 
threats, to. the President,, Vice President,, or the candidate’s for 
the Presidency to either San Diego or Miami, depending upon 
j the political party, involved. 

Where Information is. developed of a possible criminal 
. violation within the Bureau's .jurisdiction, you should 
immediately institute an investigation in accordance with 
, existing instructions and notify, the Bureau under appropriate 
•separa'te caption.^ 


- 3 - 





NAME 

ALIASES 




PHOTOGRAPH 


SEX: 

RACE:- 

DOB: 

POB: 

RESIDENCE: 

HEIGHT: 

WEIGHT:- 

BUILD: 

■HAIR: 

EYES: 

COMPLEXION: 


OCCUPATION: 

MARITAL STATUS: 

FINGERPRINT CLASSIFICATION:. 
FB.T# : 

POLICE#: 

SOCIAL SECURITY#: 





REMARKS: (EXAMPLES) SEE FBI IDENTIFICATION RECORD ATTACHED 

OR SEE (CITY) POLICE DEPARTMENT RECORD. ATTACHED. 




emONU. FORM N& tl 

may im KomoN 

OM F*MR (4t ent) MM14 


UNITED STATES • GOVERNMENT 

Memoraridurrt 


SAG, Albany ' 


OM : Director, t FBI 

V ‘f ' ' 


subject:- caLREP: 
MIDEM 


date: April 6, 1972- 


It Is an established fact that the underground 
press acts as a communication tie between New Left groups 
and. dissident elements across the Nation. 

\lhe forthcoming political Con.ventions in Miami' Beach 
on July '9-'13 and San Diego on August 21-24. will, increasingly, 
become the subject *,6f comment in this press. Through ' 
articles and announcements, ,it can be anticipated that the 
sponsors of demons tfati’qns and key leaders will attempt to 
draw large crowds to: these cities. Through this means they 
will also outline specific actions which they hope will be 
taken during, the .Conventions. 

The' Bureau .feel.s' that a careful collation and 
analysis of this material will hot :only‘ help to: reveal the 
nature of plans being -made by these groups but will show 
the extent of their’ efforts' to: advertise’ th'ese plans and to 
draw support for their endeavors.' 

In order to; do this each office is instructed to 
beg in promp’tlV to: .review the underground -press in it~ 
■territory for .articles’ .relating to; protest activities prior 

‘r.o. OT fliiri-np th ft ~ (:oti ‘ TTTi r^vi rw -i <; 1■■0^ r.outi-niie 

^until the Coir^htinns -a-T-e — e oh ci uic d -r - - ^ ^ ^ ' 


-until tne conveTir Tnns -a-T-e — eonciudca. — • 

Copies of articles ,relating to, these Conventions 
shouid be forwarded to‘ the' 'Bureau bv air.t el Attehtion : 
Domes'tic Intelligence Division; .Research Sectioh and 
captioned, either Calrep - Undergrou nd Press '6r Midem- 
Underground, Press. ^ ' 



3 - All Offices 




Ji^O -/SSS 

|SEARC'"f ,JNBEXE0„_L_.^| 


Buy U.S. 'Savings Bonds-Regularly on the Bayroll Savings Plan 


F B I 


0 


0-9 (Rev. ,5-18-71) 


Transmit in 


Via , 


(Type in plaintext or code) 


To: SAC, Miami 

From: Director, FBI 


Airtel 


(Priority) 


Date 


MIDEM 


Reurlet 3/13/72 captioned "Midem," your airtel 3/24/72 
captioned I'Midem; Weathfiig,'* and Bureau letter to Albany 4/4/72 
captioned VCalrep; Midem,” , 

In connection with your suggestion in referenced letter of 
3/13/72, it is noted that instructions have been issued to all field 
offices concerning travel of violence-prone activists to Miami and 
San Diego. Also included under these instructions are key activists,] 
key black activists and subjects included on the Extremist Bureau 
Fugitive List. It is felt that these instructions sufficiently 
cover those individuals likely to travel to Miami or San Diego for 
disruptive purposes. 

With regard to your suggestion concerning the making of 
35mm slides for "instant recognition classes," it is felt that such 
a procedure, which woulcJ include leaders and leading activists of 
antiestablishment groups, is too broad in scope. In addition, you 
suggest that photographs of leaders and leading activists of anti- 
establishment group be accompanied by information concerning their 
organizational affiliation. To do this Bureau sources would be 
involved. This is a situation which might result in the Bureau 
becoming embroiled in legal action at a later date. 

1 - Detroit 
1 - Milwaukee 
1 - San Diego 
1 - Tampa 
1 - tEO 


(Do not type below thisJine.) 


70 ^// 

r ^ ^ -^S r*:*** 




£0922 



tr^ cr' 




Airtel to Miami 
Re: Midem 


The Bureau has no objection, however, to the police ' 
using those photographs sent to you by our field offices 
pursuant to instructions in referenced Bureau letter for 
"instant recognition classes." You should, however, make certain 
that no information is furnished to the police department 
concerning organizational affiliation unless it is obtained ' 

from public sources. 





o^iONAL roaM rw. lo .w v 

MAY |«J COITION '' 

^ '^CSArpMROl Cfn) I0!-1I.« 

’■■ 'UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

• Memorandum 


DIRECTOR, FBI 

' V> 

SAcT'TAilPA '(100-2958: 


date: 4/4/72 


(00; NY) 


y/-i p 


I asserted th; 


I According to was 'ove 

to say that | (ph)- from New YorR City visited St. 

Petersbur g for- two dayi~during the week of -2/11-12/72. 
described i H as a representative of YIPPIE and remarked 

that he understood that YIPPIE had recently changed its name' 

at a conference to, ZIPPIE.- -| remained at the Edgewat,er 

Beach Motel in St. Petersburg. The purpose of his vis'it to 
St. Petersburg was to observe a youth registration ra lly in 
I Petersburg; on ,2/11/72. It. .was, at. this rally.- that I 

met^ I 


as 'overheard 


d H learned from that | | i 

and this i^erpetrated a pzeionged conversation between i 

u about the possibility of | | 

^ — : — — : Jlor„ithe_^ ZIPPIES^in connection withs-their . 

la the forthcoming Democratic Nation al Convention 

in Miami/ Florida. " ‘ — 


was to evaluate 



The 

real m 

illPos.e_ 

-ofj 

visit to 


according toF 

4- u ^ Jr" 


_] WAo 

did 

not meet 


assess how much ZIPPIE _c^_CAunt_( 

While in St! Peterghnrp- Florida, 

subject oj 


i_-t.hpm-.-j n^-thfi j-r Miam 
met with | 

the Tampa Division. 


that 


I [indicated to I I that f intended 

to leave St. Petersburg for a visit with* Miami in order to make 
arrangements and for some app.eairances of JERRY RUBIN. 

Bureau * 

pz iif , . 

WBG/bat " ' . APR 7 1B72 

( 6 ) ■ r 


APR 71972 




./•I f 


TP 100-2958 




who assured 


that he intended to 

return to St, Petersburg prior' to uuiy,' 1972